Popular St Petersburg Books

15+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On St Petersburg

Discover the list of some best books written on St Petersburg by popular award winning authors. These book on topic St Petersburg highly popular among the readers worldwide.

4.9/5

Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky , David McDuff (Translator)

Proust dec铆a que todas las novelas de Dostoievski pudieron titularse Crimen y castigo. Efectivamente, la obra entera del gran escritor ruso gira alrededor de dos ideas fundamentales: la transgresi贸n de las leyes morales y sociales, basada en el supuesto de la libertad humana, y el sometimiento posterior e inevitable a dichas leyes, dram谩tica consecuencia de la negaci贸n de Proust dec铆a que todas las novelas de Dostoievski pudieron titularse Crimen y castigo. Efectivamente, la obra entera del gran escritor ruso gira alrededor de dos ideas fundamentales: la transgresi贸n de las leyes morales y sociales, basada en el supuesto de la libertad humana, y el sometimiento posterior e inevitable a dichas leyes, dram谩tica consecuencia de la negaci贸n de esa misma libertad. Sin embargo, es en la presente narraci贸n donde este ciclo de osad铆a y arrepentimiento se expresa en su m谩s perfecta forma. Crimen y castigo tiene muy pocos rivales en la novel铆stica mundial, y aun se ha juzgado aqu铆 al arte de Dostoievski como superior al de un Henry James.

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3/5

White Nights by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

White Nights, is a short story by Fyodor Dostoevsky that was published in 1848. Set in St. Petersburg, this is the story of a young man fighting his inner restlessness. A light and tender narrative, it delves into the torment and guilt of unrequited love. Both protagonists suffer from a deep sense of alienation that initially brings them together. A blend of romanticism an White Nights, is a short story by Fyodor Dostoevsky that was published in 1848. Set in St. Petersburg, this is the story of a young man fighting his inner restlessness. A light and tender narrative, it delves into the torment and guilt of unrequited love. Both protagonists suffer from a deep sense of alienation that initially brings them together. A blend of romanticism and realism, the story appeals gently to the senses and feelings.

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4.3/5

The Overcoat by Nikolai Gogol

The Overcoat which is generally acknowledged as the finest of Gogol's memorable Saint Petersburg stories, is a tale of the absurd and misplaced obsessions.

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3.3/5

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy , Aylmer Maude (Translator) , Louise Maude (Translator) , George Gibian (Preface)

Acclaimed by many as the world's greatest novel, Anna Karenina provides a vast panorama of contemporary life in Russia and of humanity in general. In it Tolstoy uses his intense imaginative insight to create some of the most memorable characters in literature. Anna is a sophisticated woman who abandons her empty existence as the wife of Karenin and turns to Count Vronsky t Acclaimed by many as the world's greatest novel, Anna Karenina provides a vast panorama of contemporary life in Russia and of humanity in general. In it Tolstoy uses his intense imaginative insight to create some of the most memorable characters in literature. Anna is a sophisticated woman who abandons her empty existence as the wife of Karenin and turns to Count Vronsky to fulfil her passionate nature - with tragic consequences. Levin is a reflection of Tolstoy himself, often expressing the author's own views and convictions. Throughout, Tolstoy points no moral, merely inviting us not to judge but to watch. As Rosemary Edmonds comments, 'He leaves the shifting patterns of the kaleidoscope to bring home the meaning of the brooding words following the title, 'Vengeance is mine, and I will repay.

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4.3/5

The Double by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

While his literary reputation rests mainly on such celebrated novels as Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov, and The Idiot, Dostoyevsky also wrote much superb short fiction. The Double is one of the finest of his shorter works. It appeared in 1846 (his second published work) and is by far the most significant of his early stories, not least for its successful, str While his literary reputation rests mainly on such celebrated novels as Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov, and The Idiot, Dostoyevsky also wrote much superb short fiction. The Double is one of the finest of his shorter works. It appeared in 1846 (his second published work) and is by far the most significant of his early stories, not least for its successful, straight-faced treatment of a hallucinatory theme. In The Double, the protagonist, Golyadkin senior, is persecuted by his double, Golyadkin junior, who resembles him closely in almost every detail. The latter abuses the former with mounting scorn and brutality as the tale proceeds toward its frightening denouement. Characteristic Dostoyevskyan themes of helplessness, victimization, and scandal are beautifully handled here with an artistry that qualifies the story as a small masterpiece. Students of literature, admirers of Dostoyevsky, and general readers will all be delighted to have this classic work available in this inexpensive but high-quality edition.

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4/5

City of Thieves by David Benioff

From the critically acclaimed author of The 25th Hour, a captivating novel about war, courage, survival 鈥 and a remarkable friendship that ripples across a lifetime. During the Nazis鈥 brutal siege of Leningrad, Lev Beniov is arrested for looting and thrown into the same cell as a handsome deserter named Kolya. Instead of being executed, Lev and Kolya are given a shot at sav From the critically acclaimed author of The 25th Hour, a captivating novel about war, courage, survival 鈥 and a remarkable friendship that ripples across a lifetime. During the Nazis鈥 brutal siege of Leningrad, Lev Beniov is arrested for looting and thrown into the same cell as a handsome deserter named Kolya. Instead of being executed, Lev and Kolya are given a shot at saving their own lives by complying with an outrageous directive: secure a dozen eggs for a powerful Soviet colonel to use in his daughter鈥檚 wedding cake. In a city cut off from all supplies and suffering unbelievable deprivation, Lev and Kolya embark on a hunt through the dire lawlessness of Leningrad and behind enemy lines to find the impossible. By turns insightful and funny, thrilling and terrifying, City of Thieves is a gripping, cinematic World War II adventure and an intimate coming-of-age story with an utterly contemporary feel for how boys become men.

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4.2/5

The Madonnas of Leningrad by Debra Dean

Bit by bit, the ravages of age are eroding Marina's grip on the everyday. And while the elderly Russian woman cannot hold on to fresh memories鈥攖he details of her grown children's lives, the approaching wedding of her grandchild鈥攈er distant past is preserved: vivid images that rise unbidden of her youth in war-torn Leningrad. In the fall of 1941, the German army approached t Bit by bit, the ravages of age are eroding Marina's grip on the everyday. And while the elderly Russian woman cannot hold on to fresh memories鈥攖he details of her grown children's lives, the approaching wedding of her grandchild鈥攈er distant past is preserved: vivid images that rise unbidden of her youth in war-torn Leningrad. In the fall of 1941, the German army approached the outskirts of Leningrad, signaling the beginning of what would become a long and torturous siege. During the ensuing months, the city's inhabitants would brave starvation and the bitter cold, all while fending off the constant German onslaught. Marina, then a tour guide at the Hermitage Museum, along with other staff members, was instructed to take down the museum's priceless masterpieces for safekeeping, yet leave the frames hanging empty on the walls鈥攁 symbol of the artworks' eventual return. To hold on to sanity when the Luftwaffe's bombs began to fall, she burned to memory, brushstroke by brushstroke, these exquisite artworks: the nude figures of women, the angels, the serene Madonnas that had so shortly before gazed down upon her. She used them to furnish a "memory palace," a personal Hermitage in her mind to which she retreated to escape terror, hunger, and encroaching death. A refuge that would stay buried deep within her, until she needed it once more. . . .

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3.1/5

The Winter Palace: A Novel of Catherine the Great by Eva Stachniak

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Wall Street Journal 鈥 The Washington Post From award-winning author Eva Stachniak comes this passionate novel that illuminates, as only fiction can, the early life of one of history鈥檚 boldest women. The Winter Palace tells the epic story of Catherine the Great鈥檚 improbable rise to power鈥攁s seen through the ever-watchful eyes o NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Wall Street Journal 鈥 The Washington Post From award-winning author Eva Stachniak comes this passionate novel that illuminates, as only fiction can, the early life of one of history鈥檚 boldest women. The Winter Palace tells the epic story of Catherine the Great鈥檚 improbable rise to power鈥攁s seen through the ever-watchful eyes of an all-but-invisible servant close to the throne. Her name is Barbara鈥攊n Russian, Varvara. Nimble-witted and attentive, she鈥檚 allowed into the employ of the Empress Elizabeth, amid the glitter and cruelty of the world鈥檚 most eminent court. Under the tutelage of Count Bestuzhev, Chancellor and spymaster, Varvara will be educated in skills from lock picking to lovemaking, learning above all else to listen鈥攁nd to wait for opportunity. That opportunity arrives in a slender young princess from Zerbst named Sophie, a playful teenager destined to become the indomitable Catherine the Great. Sophie鈥檚 destiny at court is to marry the Empress鈥檚 nephew, but she has other, loftier, more dangerous ambitions, and she proves to be more guileful than she first appears. What Sophie needs is an insider at court, a loyal pair of eyes and ears who knows the traps, the conspiracies, and the treacheries that surround her. Varvara will become Sophie鈥檚 confidante鈥攁nd together the two young women will rise to the pinnacle of absolute power. With dazzling details and intense drama, Eva Stachniak depicts Varvara鈥檚 secret alliance with Catherine as the princess grows into a legend鈥攖hrough an enforced marriage, illicit seductions, and, at last, the shocking coup to assume the throne of all of Russia. Impeccably researched and magnificently written, The Winter Palace is an irresistible peek through the keyhole of one of history鈥檚 grandest tales. Praise for The Winter Palace 聽 鈥淎 majestic and splendidly written tale of pride, passion, intrigue, and deceit that is brought alive from the first page to the last.鈥濃擱osalind Laker 聽 鈥淎t the same time baroque and intimate, worldly and domestic, wildly strange and soulfully familiar, The Winter Palace offers a flickering glimpse of history through the gauze of deft entertainment.鈥濃擳he Washington Post 聽 鈥淎 thrilling point of view . . . Readers are treated to a firsthand account of the young princess鈥檚 slow ascent to the throne, a path deliciously strewn with discarded lovers and sanguine court intrigues.鈥濃擬inneapolis Star-Tribune 聽 鈥淸A] brilliant, bold historical novel . . . This superb biographical epic proves the Tudors don鈥檛 have a monopoly on marital scandal, royal intrigue, or feminine triumph.鈥濃擝ooklist (starred review)

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3.8/5

The Siege by Helen Dunmore

Called "elegantly, starkly beautiful" by The New York Times Book Review, The Siege is Helen Dunmore's masterpiece. Her canvas is monumental -- the Nazis' 1941 winter siege on Leningrad that killed six hundred thousand -- but her focus is heartrendingly intimate. One family, the Levins, fights to stay alive in their small apartment, held together by the unlikely courage and Called "elegantly, starkly beautiful" by The New York Times Book Review, The Siege is Helen Dunmore's masterpiece. Her canvas is monumental -- the Nazis' 1941 winter siege on Leningrad that killed six hundred thousand -- but her focus is heartrendingly intimate. One family, the Levins, fights to stay alive in their small apartment, held together by the unlikely courage and resourcefulness of twenty-two-year-old Anna. Though she dreams of an artist's life, she must instead forage for food in the ever more desperate city and watch her little brother grow cruelly thin. Their father, a blacklisted writer who once advocated a robust life of the mind, withers in spirit and body. At such brutal times everything is tested. And yet Dunmore's inspiring story shows that even then, the triumph of the human heart is that love need not fall away.

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3.5/5

The Insulted and Humiliated by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The Insulted & Injured, published soon after Dostoevsky's political imprisonment, clearly foreshadows his later preoccupation with unconscious psychological drives & their external effects on the lives of his characters. Where his later works carry these drives to inevitably dramatic conclusions, The Insulted & Injured confines them within the smaller boundarie The Insulted & Injured, published soon after Dostoevsky's political imprisonment, clearly foreshadows his later preoccupation with unconscious psychological drives & their external effects on the lives of his characters. Where his later works carry these drives to inevitably dramatic conclusions, The Insulted & Injured confines them within the smaller boundaries of everyday event. In this story the impulse toward self-abnegation in love, which appears so markedly in both Vanya & Natasha, isn't itself enough to direct their lives; instead, it combines with their social world & the mundane ambitions of Prince Valkovsky to defeat their hope of happiness. Of all the characters in the novel, only Natasha's lover, the Prince's son Alyosha-the person least driven to mold life to his own terms-emerges untouched. Here are, to a greater extent than in Dostoevsky's more familiar works, flesh-&-blood people as we see them around every day. They are made up of both good & evil, of will & acceptance. Unfailingly they command interest & illuminate understanding.

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3.5/5

Petersburg by Andrei Bely , Robert A. Maguire (Translator) , John E. Malmstad (Translator)

Taking place over a short, turbulent period in 1905, "Petersburg" is a colourful evocation of Russia's capital鈥攁 kaleidoscope of images and impressions, an eastern window on the west, a symbol of the ambiguities and paradoxes of the Russian character. History, culture, and politics are blended and juxtaposed; weather reports, current news, fashions and psychology jostle to Taking place over a short, turbulent period in 1905, "Petersburg" is a colourful evocation of Russia's capital鈥攁 kaleidoscope of images and impressions, an eastern window on the west, a symbol of the ambiguities and paradoxes of the Russian character. History, culture, and politics are blended and juxtaposed; weather reports, current news, fashions and psychology jostle together with people from Petersburg society in an exhilarating search for the identity of a city and, ultimately, Russia itself. 'The one novel that sums up the whole of Russia.'鈥擜nthony Burgess

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4.7/5

Sashenka by Simon Sebag Montefiore

Winter, 1916: In St Petersburg, Russia on the brink of revolution. Outside the Smolny Institute for Noble Young Ladies, an English governess is waiting for her young charge to be released from school. But so are the Tsar鈥檚 secret police鈥 Beautiful and headstrong, Sashenka Zeitlin is just sixteen. As her mother parties with Rasputin and her dissolute friends, Sashenka slips Winter, 1916: In St Petersburg, Russia on the brink of revolution. Outside the Smolny Institute for Noble Young Ladies, an English governess is waiting for her young charge to be released from school. But so are the Tsar鈥檚 secret police鈥 Beautiful and headstrong, Sashenka Zeitlin is just sixteen. As her mother parties with Rasputin and her dissolute friends, Sashenka slips into the frozen night to play her part in a dangerous game of conspiracy and seduction. Twenty years on, Sashenka has a powerful husband with whom she has two children. Around her people are disappearing, but her own family is safe. But she's about to embark on a forbidden love affair which will have devastating consequences. Sashenka's story lies hidden for half a century, until a young historian goes deep into Stalin's private archives and uncovers a heart-breaking tale of passion and betrayal, savage cruelty and unexpected heroism - and one woman forced to make an unbearable choice.

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4.6/5

Sofia Petrovna by Lydia Chukovskaya , Aline Werth (Translation)

Sofia Petrovna is Lydia Chukovskaya's fictional account of the Great Purge. Sofia is a Soviet Everywoman, a doctor's widow who works as a typist in a Leningrad publishing house. When her beloved son is caught up in the maelstrom of the purge, she joins the long lines of women outside the prosecutor's office, hoping against hope for good news. Confronted with a world that m Sofia Petrovna is Lydia Chukovskaya's fictional account of the Great Purge. Sofia is a Soviet Everywoman, a doctor's widow who works as a typist in a Leningrad publishing house. When her beloved son is caught up in the maelstrom of the purge, she joins the long lines of women outside the prosecutor's office, hoping against hope for good news. Confronted with a world that makes no moral sense, Sofia goes mad, a madness which manifests itself in delusions little different from the lies those around her tell every day to protect themselves. Sofia Petrovna offers a rare and vital record of Stalin's Great Purges.

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4.4/5

Eugene Onegin by Alexander Pushkin , James E. Falen (Translator)

Eugene Onegin is the master work of the poet whom Russians regard as the fountainhead of their literature. Set in imperial Russia during the 1820s, Pushkin's novel in verse follows the emotions and destiny of three men - Onegin the bored fop, Lensky the minor elegiast, and a stylized Pushkin himself - and the fates and affections of three women - Tatyana the provincial bea Eugene Onegin is the master work of the poet whom Russians regard as the fountainhead of their literature. Set in imperial Russia during the 1820s, Pushkin's novel in verse follows the emotions and destiny of three men - Onegin the bored fop, Lensky the minor elegiast, and a stylized Pushkin himself - and the fates and affections of three women - Tatyana the provincial beauty, her sister Olga, and Pushkin's mercurial Muse. Engaging, full of suspense, and varied in tone, it also portrays a large cast of other characters and offers the reader many literary, philosophical, and autobiographical digressions, often in a highly satirical vein. Eugene Onegin was Pushkin's own favourite work, and it shows him attempting to transform himself from romantic poet into realistic novelist. This new translation seeks to retain both the literal sense and the poetic music of the original, and capture the poem's spontaneity and wit. The introduction examines several ways of reading the novel, and the text is richly annotated.

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4.2/5

Six Days in Leningrad by Paullina Simons

The never-before-told story of the journey behind THE BRONZE HORSEMAN, now in print for the first time. From the author of the celebrated, internationally bestselling BRONZE HORSEMAN saga comes a glimpse into the private life of its much loved creator, and the real story behind the epic novels. Paullina Simons gives us a work of non-fiction as captivating and heart-wrenchin The never-before-told story of the journey behind THE BRONZE HORSEMAN, now in print for the first time. From the author of the celebrated, internationally bestselling BRONZE HORSEMAN saga comes a glimpse into the private life of its much loved creator, and the real story behind the epic novels. Paullina Simons gives us a work of non-fiction as captivating and heart-wrenching as the lives of Tatiana and Alexander. Only a few chapters into writing her first story set in Russia, her mother country, Paullina Simons travelled to Leningrad (now St Petersburg) with her beloved Papa. What began as a research trip turned into six days that forever changed her life, the course of her family, and the novel that became THE BRONZE HORSEMAN. After a quarter-century away from her native land, Paullina and her father found a world trapped in yesteryear, with crumbling stucco buildings, entire families living in seven-square-metre communal apartments, and barren fields bombed so badly that nothing would grow there even fifty years later. And yet there were the spectacular white nights, the warm hospitality of family friends and, of course, the pelmeni and caviar. At times poignant, at times inspiring and funny, this is both a fascinating glimpse into the inspiration behind the epic saga, and a touching story of a family's history, a father and a daughter, and the fate of a nation. 'Amazing book! Thank you Paullina for sharing your experience with us all!'- Kiki, Goodreads

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