Popular Railway History Books

11+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Railway History

Discover the list of some best books written on Railway History by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Railway History highly popular among the readers worldwide.

5/5

The Wreck of the Penn Central by Joseph R. Daughen

It took ten years of laborious planning and exhaustive negotiations to create the mammoth Penn Central Railroad, the largest railroad in United States history. When the leviathan was finally born of a merger between the Pennsylvania and New York Central Railroads on February 1, 1968, the event was hailed as a great day for railroading. But the baby giant survived only 367 It took ten years of laborious planning and exhaustive negotiations to create the mammoth Penn Central Railroad, the largest railroad in United States history. When the leviathan was finally born of a merger between the Pennsylvania and New York Central Railroads on February 1, 1968, the event was hailed as a great day for railroading. But the baby giant survived only 367 days. The crash of the Penn Central set a new record, this time for the largest bankruptcy the United States had ever seen. "The Wreck of the Penn Central" provides a close-up view of the events that brought the Big Train to bankruptcy court--over-regulation, subsidized competition, big labor featherbedding, greed, corporate back-stabbing, stunning incompetence, and, yes, even a little sex.

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3.8/5

Sunset Limited: The Southern Pacific Railroad and the Development of the American West, 1850-1930 by Richard J. Orsi

The only major U.S. railroad to be operated by westerners and the only railroad built from west to east, the Southern Pacific acquired a unique history and character. It also acquired a reputation, especially in California, as a railroad that people loved to hate. This magisterial history tells the full story of the Southern Pacific for the first time, shattering myths abo The only major U.S. railroad to be operated by westerners and the only railroad built from west to east, the Southern Pacific acquired a unique history and character. It also acquired a reputation, especially in California, as a railroad that people loved to hate. This magisterial history tells the full story of the Southern Pacific for the first time, shattering myths about the company that have prevailed to this day. A landmark account, Sunset Limited explores the railroad's development and influence—especially as it affected land settlement, agriculture, water policy, and the environment—and offers a new perspective on the tremendous, often surprising, role the company played in shaping the American West. Based on his unprecedented and extensive research into the company's historical archives, Richard Orsi finds that, contrary to conventional understanding, the Southern Pacific Company identified its corporate well-being with population growth and social and economic development in the railroad's hinterland. As he traces the complex and shifting intersections between corporate and public interest, Orsi documents the railroad's little-known promotion of land distribution, small-scale farming, scientific agriculture, and less wasteful environmental practices and policies—including water conservation and wilderness and recreational parklands preservation. Meticulously researched, lucidly written, and judiciously balanced, Sunset Limited opens a new window onto the American West in a crucial phase of its development and will forever change our perceptions of one of the largest and most important western corporations in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

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3.3/5

Harriman vs. Hill: Wall Street’s Great Railroad War by Larry Haeg

In 1901, the Northern Pacific was an unlikely prize: a twice-bankrupt construction of the federal government, it was a two-bit railroad (literally—five years back, its stock traded for twenty-five cents a share). But it was also a key to connecting eastern markets through Chicago to the rising West. Two titans of American railroads set their sights on it: James J. Hill, he In 1901, the Northern Pacific was an unlikely prize: a twice-bankrupt construction of the federal government, it was a two-bit railroad (literally—five years back, its stock traded for twenty-five cents a share). But it was also a key to connecting eastern markets through Chicago to the rising West. Two titans of American railroads set their sights on it: James J. Hill, head of the Great Northern and largest individual shareholder of the Northern Pacific, and Edward Harriman, head of the Union Pacific and the Southern Pacific. The subsequent contest was unprecedented in the history of American enterprise, pitting not only Hill against Harriman but also Big Oil against Big Steel and J. P. Morgan against the Rockefellers, with a supporting cast of enough wealthy investors to fill the ballroom of the Waldorf Astoria. The story, told here in full for the first time, transports us to the New York Stock Exchange during the unfolding of the earliest modern-day stock market panic. Harriman vs. Hill re-creates the drama of four tumultuous days in May 1901, when the common stock of the Northern Pacific rocketed from one hundred ten dollars a share to one thousand in a mere seventeen hours of trading—the result of an inadvertent “corner” caused by the opposing forces. Panic followed and then, in short order, a calamity for the “shorts,” a compromise, the near-collapse of Wall Street brokerages and banks, the most precipitous decline ever in American stock values, and the fastest recovery. Larry Haeg brings to life the ensuing stalemate and truce, which led to the forming of a holding company, briefly the biggest railroad combine in American history, and the U.S. Supreme Court ruling against the deal, launching the reputation of Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes as the “great dissenter” and President Theodore Roosevelt as the “trust buster.” The forces of competition and combination, unfettered growth, government regulation, and corporate ambition—all the elements of American business at its best and worst—come into play in the account of this epic battle, whose effects echo through our economy to this day.

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4.9/5

Jay Cooke's Gamble: The Northern Pacific Railroad, the Sioux, and the Panic of 1873 by M. John Lubetkin

In 1869, Jay Cooke, the brilliant but idiosyncratic American banker, decided to finance the Northern Pacific, a transcontinental railroad planned from Duluth, Minnesota, to Seattle. M. John Lubetkin tells how Cooke’s gamble reignited war with the Sioux, rescued George Armstrong Custer from obscurity, created Yellowstone Park, pushed frontier settlement four hundred miles w In 1869, Jay Cooke, the brilliant but idiosyncratic American banker, decided to finance the Northern Pacific, a transcontinental railroad planned from Duluth, Minnesota, to Seattle. M. John Lubetkin tells how Cooke’s gamble reignited war with the Sioux, rescued George Armstrong Custer from obscurity, created Yellowstone Park, pushed frontier settlement four hundred miles westward, and triggered the Panic of 1873. Staking his reputation and wealth on the Northern Pacific, Cooke was soon whipsawed by the railroad’s mismanagement, questionable contracts, and construction problems. Financier J. P. Morgan undermined him, and the Crédit Mobilier scandal ended congressional support. When railroad surveyors and army escorts ignored Sioux chief Sitting Bull’s warning not to enter the Yellowstone Valley, Indian attacks—combined with alcoholic commanders—led to embarrassing setbacks on the field, in the nation’s press, and among investors. Lubetkin’s suspenseful narrative describes events played out from Wall Street to the Yellowstone and vividly portrays the soldiers, engineers, businessmen, politicians, and Native Americans who tried to build or block the Northern Pacific.

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3.3/5

Nevada Central: Sagebrush Narrow Gauge by Mallory Hope Ferrell

This deluxe narrow gauge volume traces the amazing story of this three-foot-gauge railroad that ran through the heart of the great American Basin. Built to carry the commerce of rich silver and gold strikes, the Nevada Central struggled against tremendous odds for six decades. Often called “a line in the sand,” the 93-mile-long rail route ran between Battle Mountain, where This deluxe narrow gauge volume traces the amazing story of this three-foot-gauge railroad that ran through the heart of the great American Basin. Built to carry the commerce of rich silver and gold strikes, the Nevada Central struggled against tremendous odds for six decades. Often called “a line in the sand,” the 93-mile-long rail route ran between Battle Mountain, where it connected with the Central Pacific, in a southwesterly direction to Austin, Nevada. Most of the rail was 35# iron; the struggling railroad line crossed 66 timber trestles between its end points. The railroad began construction in 1879 to help open up the vast and virtually unpopulated area of the Silver State. Running through some of the most barren and remote high desert sagebrush and mountain country in the West, the Nevada Central rolled down through the years with much of its original equipment, mainly because it could never afford to purchase anything newer. The line was finally abandoned in December of 1937 and was sold for scrap the next year. The narrow gauge equipment that forms a major part of the California State Railroad Museum collection came from the Nevada Central. In 1938, the late Disney artist Ward Kimball purchased the Nevada Central’s 1881-built #2 Mogul for $400. The former Sidney Dillon was transported to the orange grove where Ward and his wife, Betty, were building a new home. The locomotive joined a former Carson & Colorado coach, and Ward’s railroad collection started to grow. For author Ferrell, a former combat fighter pilot, this is his 20th book about railroads. He has been called the best-loved narrow gauge railroad author in the United States. The Virginia native has authored hundreds of railroad articles and won dozens of awards with his exquisite models. Ferrell’s picture collections of railroads and the Old West number well over 150,000 prints. Ferrell says his research on his latest book included “mixing with cowboys, sheepmen, ranchers and thirsty miners at Austin’s (Nevada) Golden Club Saloon, and listening to their stories of the real Old West.”

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3.1/5

Railroads of Nevada and Eastern California: Volume One by David F. Myrick

Valuable as these volumes are in relation to railroad operations in Nevada and California, their usefulness as authoritative reference sources embraces a much broader scope. Railroads of Nevada and Eastern California is as much a history of the region as it is a study of the railroads. The principal mines and mills and their production are scrupulously detailed, together w Valuable as these volumes are in relation to railroad operations in Nevada and California, their usefulness as authoritative reference sources embraces a much broader scope. Railroads of Nevada and Eastern California is as much a history of the region as it is a study of the railroads. The principal mines and mills and their production are scrupulously detailed, together with the personalities who created them.A map has been provided in Volume I to orient the reader to the locales described. It is an accurate and reliable travel aid for readers who choose to wander the region’s historic railroad routes. In this volume, Myrick begins his history with coverage of the sprawling network of the northern railroads, including the Austin City Railway, Mid-Pacific Railroad, Nevada-California-Oregon Railway, and Sierra Nevada Wood and Lumber Company.

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3.3/5

Appetite for America: How Visionary Businessman Fred Harvey Built a Railroad Hospitality Empire That Civilized the Wild West by Stephen Fried

The legendary life and entrepreneurial vision of Fred Harvey helped shape American culture and history for three generations—from the 1880s all the way through World War II—and still influence our lives today in surprising and fascinating ways. Now award-winning journalist Stephen Fried re-creates the life of this unlikely American hero, the founding father of the nation’s The legendary life and entrepreneurial vision of Fred Harvey helped shape American culture and history for three generations—from the 1880s all the way through World War II—and still influence our lives today in surprising and fascinating ways. Now award-winning journalist Stephen Fried re-creates the life of this unlikely American hero, the founding father of the nation’s service industry, whose remarkable family business civilized the West and introduced America to Americans. Appetite for America is the incredible real-life story of Fred Harvey—told in depth for the first time ever—as well as the story of this country’s expansion into the Wild West of Bat Masterson and Billy the Kid, of the great days of the railroad, of a time when a deal could still be made with a handshake and the United States was still uniting. As a young immigrant, Fred Harvey worked his way up from dishwasher to household name: He was Ray Kroc before McDonald’s, J. Willard Marriott before Marriott Hotels, Howard Schultz before Starbucks. His eating houses and hotels along the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe railroad (including historic lodges still in use at the Grand Canyon) were patronized by princes, presidents, and countless ordinary travelers looking for the best cup of coffee in the country. Harvey’s staff of carefully screened single young women—the celebrated Harvey Girls—were the country’s first female workforce and became genuine Americana, even inspiring an MGM musical starring Judy Garland. With the verve and passion of Fred Harvey himself, Stephen Fried tells the story of how this visionary built his business from a single lunch counter into a family empire whose marketing and innovations we still encounter in myriad ways. Inspiring, instructive, and hugely entertaining, Appetite for America is historical biography that is as richly rewarding as a slice of fresh apple pie—and every bit as satisfying.

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4.1/5

Railroads in the Old South: Pursuing Progress in a Slave Society by Aaron W. Marrs

Aaron W. Marrs challenges the accepted understanding of economic and industrial growth in antebellum America with this original study of the history of the railroad in the Old South. Drawing from both familiar and overlooked sources, such as the personal diaries of Southern travelers, papers and letters from civil engineers, corporate records, and contemporary newspaper acc Aaron W. Marrs challenges the accepted understanding of economic and industrial growth in antebellum America with this original study of the history of the railroad in the Old South. Drawing from both familiar and overlooked sources, such as the personal diaries of Southern travelers, papers and letters from civil engineers, corporate records, and contemporary newspaper accounts, Marrs skillfully expands on the conventional business histories that have characterized scholarship in this field. He situates railroads in the fullness of antebellum life, examining how slavery, technology, labor, social convention, and the environment shaped their evolution. Far from seeing the Old South as backward and premodern, Marrs finds evidence of urban life, industry, and entrepreneurship throughout the region. But these signs of progress existed alongside efforts to preserve traditional ways of life. Railroads exemplified Southerners' pursuit of progress on their own terms: developing modern transportation while retaining a conservative social order. Railroads in the Old South demonstrates that a simple approach to the Old South fails to do justice to its complexity and contradictions.

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4.2/5

Triumph VIII: Pittsburgh - Eye of Two Storms 1749-2006 (Triumph series, 8) by Charles S. Roberts

8.5x11.5", color laminated hardcover. "The first truly World War began in 1749 and was actually triggered by feisty Americans in a bid for control of the Upper Ohio River Valley. The Great Railroad War, in the event a struggle between B&O and PRR for dominance of the same valley, began in 1827. Pittsburgh became the focus of these two conflicts. "This book tells the dra 8.5x11.5", color laminated hardcover. "The first truly World War began in 1749 and was actually triggered by feisty Americans in a bid for control of the Upper Ohio River Valley. The Great Railroad War, in the event a struggle between B&O and PRR for dominance of the same valley, began in 1827. Pittsburgh became the focus of these two conflicts. "This book tells the dramatic adventure story of these history-changing events and covers the evolution of the Region through 2006. Hardbound, UV laminated five-color cover, 8-1/2 x11, 400 pages with 577 photos, maps and illustrations (13 in color), enamel paper."

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3.4/5

Royal Blue Line: The Classic B&o Train Between Washington and New York by Herbert H. Harwood Jr.

Although it was America's first public railroad, chartered in 1827, the Baltimore & Ohio did not enter the lucrative Philadelphia and New York City markets until the 1880s, long after its rivals, notably the Pennsylvania Railroad, had established themselves in the Northeast corridor. In order to compete, B & O executives realized they would need to create a railroa Although it was America's first public railroad, chartered in 1827, the Baltimore & Ohio did not enter the lucrative Philadelphia and New York City markets until the 1880s, long after its rivals, notably the Pennsylvania Railroad, had established themselves in the Northeast corridor. In order to compete, B & O executives realized they would need to create a railroad like no other, and in 1890 they launched the Royal Blue Line, offering premier passenger service between Washington, DC, and New York City. Boasting the company's fastest locomotives (designed specifically for the line and featuring the country's first mainline passenger diesel engine), its most luxurious passenger cars (the first in the nation to be air-conditioned), and dining cars that served exquisite regional cuisine - as well as a motor coach service that took passengers from the line's New Jersey terminus into Manhattan, still fondly remembered by many as the most civilized way to enter the city - the Royal Blue Line was, as advertised, the Finest Daylight Train Service in the World.

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4.1/5

Rising from the Rails: Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class by Larry Tye

"A lively and engaging chronicle that adds yet another dimension to the historical record." -The Boston Globe When George Pullman began recruiting Southern blacks as porters in his luxurious new sleeping cars, the former slaves suffering under Jim Crow laws found his offer of a steady job and worldly experience irresistible. They quickly signed up to serve as maid, waiter, "A lively and engaging chronicle that adds yet another dimension to the historical record." -The Boston Globe When George Pullman began recruiting Southern blacks as porters in his luxurious new sleeping cars, the former slaves suffering under Jim Crow laws found his offer of a steady job and worldly experience irresistible. They quickly signed up to serve as maid, waiter, concierge, nanny, and occasionally doctor and undertaker to cars full of white passengers, making the Pullman Company the largest employer of African Americans in the country by the 1920s. Drawing on extensive interviews with dozens of porters and their descendants, Larry Tye reconstructs the complicated world of the Pullman porter and the vital cultural, political, and economic roles they played as forerunners of the modern black middle class. Rising from the Rails provides a lively and enlightening look at this important social phenomenon.

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