Popular Numeracy Books

14+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Numeracy

Discover the list of some best books written on Numeracy by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Numeracy highly popular among the readers worldwide.

3.5/5

One Is a Snail, Ten Is a Crab: A Counting by Feet Book by April Pulley Sayre , Jeff Sayre , Randy Cecil (Illustrator)

If one is a snail, and two is a person... we must be counting by feet! Children will love this hilariously illustrated introduction to simple counting and multiplication with big feet and small - on people and spiders, dogs and insects, snails and crabs - from one to one hundred!

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3.3/5

What’s the Opposite? by Oliver Jeffers

A comic visual exploration of opposites, from prize-winning, internationally best-selling picture book maker, Oliver Jeffers. In this 4th title in the series, the Hueys explore the concept of opposites in their characteristically quirky way. Starting out with some easy ones like ‘up’ and ‘down’, they move on to ever more wildy imaginative examples, guaranteed to raise a smi A comic visual exploration of opposites, from prize-winning, internationally best-selling picture book maker, Oliver Jeffers. In this 4th title in the series, the Hueys explore the concept of opposites in their characteristically quirky way. Starting out with some easy ones like ‘up’ and ‘down’, they move on to ever more wildy imaginative examples, guaranteed to raise a smile! Packed full of visual humour, this book will be enjoyed by children and adults alike.

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3.4/5

The Hueys in None the Number: A Counting Adventure by Oliver Jeffers

Learn to count with the #1 New York Times bestselling artist of THE DAY THE CRAYONS QUIT and his hilarious cast of Hueys! "Is none a number?" you might ask. I'm glad you did. The answer is Yes! For example, how many lumps of cheese do you see next to you? The answer, depending on where you are, is likely "none." Counting with the reader all the way up to ten, the Hueys ex Learn to count with the #1 New York Times bestselling artist of THE DAY THE CRAYONS QUIT and his hilarious cast of Hueys! "Is none a number?" you might ask. I'm glad you did. The answer is Yes! For example, how many lumps of cheese do you see next to you? The answer, depending on where you are, is likely "none." Counting with the reader all the way up to ten, the Hueys explain numbers as only they can. Such as: The number 4 is the number of tantrums thrown by Dave every day. 7 is the number of oranges balanced on things. And 9 is the number of seagulls who attacked Frank's French fries. Together they make quite a spectacle. But when you take away all of these fun illustrations in the book? You're left with none! This funny and accessible counting book from #1 New York Times bestseller Oliver Jeffers (The Day the Crayons Quit; This Moose Belongs to Me) gives the Hueys one more reason to be every young child's best friends.

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3.6/5

How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking by Jordan Ellenberg

The Freakonomics of math—a math-world superstar unveils the hidden beauty and logic of the world and puts its power in our hands The math we learn in school can seem like a dull set of rules, laid down by the ancients and not to be questioned. In How Not to Be Wrong, Jordan Ellenberg shows us how terribly limiting this view is: Math isn’t confined to abstract incidents that The Freakonomics of math—a math-world superstar unveils the hidden beauty and logic of the world and puts its power in our hands The math we learn in school can seem like a dull set of rules, laid down by the ancients and not to be questioned. In How Not to Be Wrong, Jordan Ellenberg shows us how terribly limiting this view is: Math isn’t confined to abstract incidents that never occur in real life, but rather touches everything we do—the whole world is shot through with it. Math allows us to see the hidden structures underneath the messy and chaotic surface of our world. It’s a science of not being wrong, hammered out by centuries of hard work and argument. Armed with the tools of mathematics, we can see through to the true meaning of information we take for granted: How early should you get to the airport? What does “public opinion” really represent? Why do tall parents have shorter children? Who really won Florida in 2000? And how likely are you, really, to develop cancer? How Not to Be Wrong presents the surprising revelations behind all of these questions and many more, using the mathematician’s method of analyzing life and exposing the hard-won insights of the academic community to the layman—minus the jargon. Ellenberg chases mathematical threads through a vast range of time and space, from the everyday to the cosmic, encountering, among other things, baseball, Reaganomics, daring lottery schemes, Voltaire, the replicability crisis in psychology, Italian Renaissance painting, artificial languages, the development of non-Euclidean geometry, the coming obesity apocalypse, Antonin Scalia’s views on crime and punishment, the psychology of slime molds, what Facebook can and can’t figure out about you, and the existence of God. Ellenberg pulls from history as well as from the latest theoretical developments to provide those not trained in math with the knowledge they need. Math, as Ellenberg says, is “an atomic-powered prosthesis that you attach to your common sense, vastly multiplying its reach and strength.” With the tools of mathematics in hand, you can understand the world in a deeper, more meaningful way. How Not to Be Wrong will show you how.

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3.5/5

Mathematical Mindsets: Unleashing Students' Potential Through Creative Math, Inspiring Messages and Innovative Teaching by Jo Boaler

Banish math anxiety and give students of all ages a clear roadmap to success. Mathematical Mindsets provides practical strategies and activities to help teachers and parents show all children, even those who are convinced that they are bad at math, that they can enjoy and succeed in math. Jo Boaler--Stanford researcher, professor of math education, and expert on math learn Banish math anxiety and give students of all ages a clear roadmap to success. Mathematical Mindsets provides practical strategies and activities to help teachers and parents show all children, even those who are convinced that they are bad at math, that they can enjoy and succeed in math. Jo Boaler--Stanford researcher, professor of math education, and expert on math learning--has studied why students don't like math and often fail in math classes. She's followed thousands of students through middle and high schools to study how they learn and to find the most effective ways to unleash the math potential in all students. There is a clear gap between what research has shown to work in teaching math and what happens in schools and at home. This book bridges that gap by turning research findings into practical activities and advice. Boaler translates Carol Dweck's concept of 'mindset' into math teaching and parenting strategies, showing how students can go from self-doubt to strong self-confidence, which is so important to math learning. Boaler reveals the steps that must be taken by schools and parents to improve math education for all. Mathematical Mindsets: Explains how the brain processes mathematics learning Reveals how to turn mistakes and struggles into valuable learning experiences Provides examples of rich mathematical activities to replace rote learning Explains ways to give students a positive math mindset Gives examples of how assessment and grading policies need to change to support real understanding Scores of students hate and fear math, so they end up leaving school without an understanding of basic mathematical concepts. Their evasion and departure hinders math-related pathways and STEM career opportunities. Research has shown very clear methods to change this phenomena, but the information has been confined to research journals--until now. Mathematical Mindsets provides a proven, practical roadmap to mathematics success for any student at any age.

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5/5

If: A Mind-Bending New Way of Looking at Big Ideas and Numbers by David J. Smith , Steve Adams (Illustrator)

"Some things are so huge or so old that it's hard to wrap your mind around them. But what if we took these big, hard-to-imagine objects and events and compared them to things we can see, feel and touch? Instantly, we'd see our world in a whole new way." So begins this endlessly intriguing guide to better understanding all those really big ideas and numbers children come ac "Some things are so huge or so old that it's hard to wrap your mind around them. But what if we took these big, hard-to-imagine objects and events and compared them to things we can see, feel and touch? Instantly, we'd see our world in a whole new way." So begins this endlessly intriguing guide to better understanding all those really big ideas and numbers children come across on a regular basis. Author David J. Smith has found clever devices to scale down everything from time lines (the history of Earth compressed into one year), to quantities (all the wealth in the world divided into one hundred coins), to size differences (the planets shown as different types of balls). Accompanying each description is a kid-friendly drawing by illustrator Steve Adams that visually reinforces the concept. By simply reducing everything to human scale, Smith has made the incomprehensible easier to grasp, and therefore more meaningful. The children who just love these kinds of fact-filled, knock-your-socks-off books will want to read this one from cover to cover. It will find the most use, however, as an excellent classroom reference that can be reached for again and again when studying scale and measurement in math, and also for any number of applications in social studies, science and language arts. For those who want to delve a little deeper, Smith has included six suggestions for classroom projects. There is also a full page of resource information at the back of the book.

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4.6/5

Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and Its Consequences by John Allen Paulos

Dozens of examples in innumeracy show us how it affects not only personal economics and travel plans, but explains mis-chosen mates, inappropriate drug-testing, and the allure of pseudo-science.

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3.5/5

The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

THE all-time classic picture book, from generation to generation, sold somewhere in the world every 30 seconds! Have you shared it with a child or grandchild in your life? Including a special feature, dye cuts, this beautiful board book edition, perfect for teaching the days of the week, offers readers an interactive experience.

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4.6/5

Here's Looking at Euclid: A Surprising Excursion Through the Astonishing World of Math by Alex Bellos

Too often math gets a bad rap, characterized as dry and difficult. But, Alex Bellos says, "math can be inspiring and brilliantly creative. Mathematical thought is one of the great achievements of the human race, and arguably the foundation of all human progress. The world of mathematics is a remarkable place."Bellos has traveled all around the globe and has plunged into hi Too often math gets a bad rap, characterized as dry and difficult. But, Alex Bellos says, "math can be inspiring and brilliantly creative. Mathematical thought is one of the great achievements of the human race, and arguably the foundation of all human progress. The world of mathematics is a remarkable place."Bellos has traveled all around the globe and has plunged into history to uncover fascinating stories of mathematical achievement, from the breakthroughs of Euclid, the greatest mathematician of all time, to the creations of the Zen master of origami, one of the hottest areas of mathematical work today. Taking us into the wilds of the Amazon, he tells the story of a tribe there who can count only to five and reports on the latest findings about the math instinct--including the revelation that ants can actually count how many steps they've taken. Journeying to the Bay of Bengal, he interviews a Hindu sage about the brilliant mathematical insights of the Buddha, while in Japan he visits the godfather of Sudoku and introduces the brainteasing delights of mathematical games.Exploring the mysteries of randomness, he explains why it is impossible for our iPods to truly randomly select songs. In probing the many intrigues of that most beloved of numbers, pi, he visits with two brothers so obsessed with the elusive number that they built a supercomputer in their Manhattan apartment to study it. Throughout, the journey is enhanced with a wealth of intriguing illustrations, such as of the clever puzzles known as tangrams and the crochet creation of an American math professor who suddenly realized one day that she could knit a representation of higher dimensional space that no one had been able to visualize. Whether writing about how algebra solved Swedish traffic problems, visiting the Mental Calculation World Cup to disclose the secrets of lightning calculation, or exploring the links between pineapples and beautiful teeth, Bellos is a wonderfully engaging guide who never fails to delight even as he edifies. "Here's Looking at Euclid "is a rare gem that brings the beauty of math to life.

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4.6/5

Making Sense of Number, K-10: Getting to Know Your Students So You Can Support the Development of Their Mathematical Understanding by Mary Fiore

This practical book shows you how to get to know the needs and abilities of your students so you can help them make sense of math concepts. You will discover how to structure learning experiences around key number concepts: quantity, counting, relating, and representing. The key concepts will be developed across the various strands: patterning and algebra, number and opera This practical book shows you how to get to know the needs and abilities of your students so you can help them make sense of math concepts. You will discover how to structure learning experiences around key number concepts: quantity, counting, relating, and representing. The key concepts will be developed across the various strands: patterning and algebra, number and operations, measurement, geometry, and data and probability.

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3.2/5

How Much Is a Million? by David M. Schwartz , Steven Kellogg (Illustrator)

“A jubilant, original picture book.” —Booklist (starred review) Ever wonder just what a million of something means? How about a billion? Or a trillion? Marvelosissimo the mathematical magician can teach you! How Much Is a Million? knocks complex numbers down to size in a fun, humorous way, helping children conceptualize a difficult mathematical concept. It's a math class you “A jubilant, original picture book.” —Booklist (starred review) Ever wonder just what a million of something means? How about a billion? Or a trillion? Marvelosissimo the mathematical magician can teach you! How Much Is a Million? knocks complex numbers down to size in a fun, humorous way, helping children conceptualize a difficult mathematical concept. It's a math class you'll never forget. This classic picture book is an ALA Notable Book, a Reading Rainbow Feature Selection, and a Boston Globe/Horn Book Honor Book for Illustration. The repackage of this fun look at math concepts includes a letter from the author that features several ways for children to find a million everyday things.

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4.2/5

The Doorbell Rang by Pat Hutchins

Each ring of the doorbell brings more friends to share the delicious cookies Ma has made in this beloved classic. This enjoyable read-aloud picture book about friendship, sharing, and cookies can also be used to introduce basic math concepts to young children. "Refreshing, enjoyable, and unpredictable."—School Library Journal Pat Hutchins is the celebrated creator of numerou Each ring of the doorbell brings more friends to share the delicious cookies Ma has made in this beloved classic. This enjoyable read-aloud picture book about friendship, sharing, and cookies can also be used to introduce basic math concepts to young children. "Refreshing, enjoyable, and unpredictable."—School Library Journal Pat Hutchins is the celebrated creator of numerous award-winning books for children, including Rosie's Walk, Titch, and Don't Forget the Bacon! The Doorbell Rang was named a Notable Book for Children by the American Library Association.

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4.1/5

Diary of a Wombat by Jackie French , Bruce Whatley (Illustrator)

Wombats are cuddly-looking, slow-moving Australian animals. Their favorite activities are eating, sleeping, and digging holes. Here, in the words of one unusually articulate wombat, is the tongue-in-cheek account of a busy week; eating, sleeping, digging holes . . . and training its new neighbors, a family of humans, to produce treats on demand. This entertaining book, wit Wombats are cuddly-looking, slow-moving Australian animals. Their favorite activities are eating, sleeping, and digging holes. Here, in the words of one unusually articulate wombat, is the tongue-in-cheek account of a busy week; eating, sleeping, digging holes . . . and training its new neighbors, a family of humans, to produce treats on demand. This entertaining book, with its brief, humorous text and hilarious illustrations, will endear the wombat to young children, who may recognize in the determined furry creature some qualities that they share.

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4.1/5

Equal Shmequal by Virginia L. Kroll , Philomena O'Neill (Illustrator)

What does it mean to be equal? Mouse and her friends want to play tug-of-war but they can't figure out how to make teams that are equal. Nothing works until Mouse starts thinking mathematically. Wonderful illustrations capture Mouse and her animal friends from whiskers to tails.

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