Popular Algeria Books

26+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Algeria

Discover the list of some best books written on Algeria by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Algeria highly popular among the readers worldwide.

5/5

The Sealwoman's Gift by Sally Magnusson

In 1627 Barbary pirates raided the coast of Iceland and abducted some 400 of its people, including 250 from a tiny island off the mainland. Among the captives sold into slavery in Algiers were the island pastor, his wife and their three children. Although the raid itself is well documented, little is known about what happened to the women and children afterwards. It was a In 1627 Barbary pirates raided the coast of Iceland and abducted some 400 of its people, including 250 from a tiny island off the mainland. Among the captives sold into slavery in Algiers were the island pastor, his wife and their three children. Although the raid itself is well documented, little is known about what happened to the women and children afterwards. It was a time when women everywhere were largely silent. In this brilliant reimagining, Sally Magnusson gives a voice to Ásta, the pastor's wife. Enslaved in an alien Arab culture Ásta meets the loss of both her freedom and her children with the one thing she has brought from home: the stories in her head. Steeped in the sagas and folk tales of her northern homeland, she finds herself experiencing not just the separations and agonies of captivity, but the reassessments that come in any age when intelligent eyes are opened to other lives, other cultures and other kinds of loving. The Sealwoman's Gift is about the eternal power of storytelling to help us survive. The novel is full of stories - Icelandic ones told to fend off a slave-owner's advances, Arabian ones to help an old man die. And there are others, too: the stories we tell ourselves to protect our minds from what cannot otherwise be borne, the stories we need to make us happy.

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4.8/5

L'Art de perdre by Alice Zeniter , Έφη Κορομηλά (Translator)

L’Algérie dont est originaire sa famille n’a longtemps été pour Naïma qu’une toile de fond sans grand intérêt. Pourtant, dans une société française traversée par les questions identitaires, tout semble vouloir la renvoyer à ses origines. Mais quel lien pourrait-elle avoir avec une histoire familiale qui jamais ne lui a été racontée ? Son grand-père Ali, un montagnard kabyle L’Algérie dont est originaire sa famille n’a longtemps été pour Naïma qu’une toile de fond sans grand intérêt. Pourtant, dans une société française traversée par les questions identitaires, tout semble vouloir la renvoyer à ses origines. Mais quel lien pourrait-elle avoir avec une histoire familiale qui jamais ne lui a été racontée ? Son grand-père Ali, un montagnard kabyle, est mort avant qu’elle ait pu lui demander pourquoi l’Histoire avait fait de lui un « harki ». Yema, sa grand-mère, pourrait peut-être répondre mais pas dans une langue que Naïma comprenne. Quant à Hamid, son père, arrivé en France à l’été 1962 dans les camps de transit hâtivement mis en place, il ne parle plus de l’Algérie de son enfance. Comment faire ressurgir un pays du silence ? Dans une fresque romanesque puissante et audacieuse, Alice Zeniter raconte le destin, entre la France et l’Algérie, des générations successives d’une famille prisonnière d’un passé tenace. Mais ce livre est aussi un grand roman sur la liberté d’être soi, au-delà des héritages et des injonctions intimes ou sociales.

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4.9/5

Nos richesses by Kaouther Adimi

En 1935, Edmond Charlot a vingt ans et il rentre à Alger avec une seule idée en tête, prendre exemple sur Adrienne Monnier et sa librairie parisienne. Charlot le sait, sa vocation est de choisir, d'accoucher, de promouvoir de jeunes écrivains de la Méditerranée, sans distinction de langue ou de religion. Placée sous l'égide de Giono, sa minuscule librairie est baptisée Les En 1935, Edmond Charlot a vingt ans et il rentre à Alger avec une seule idée en tête, prendre exemple sur Adrienne Monnier et sa librairie parisienne. Charlot le sait, sa vocation est de choisir, d'accoucher, de promouvoir de jeunes écrivains de la Méditerranée, sans distinction de langue ou de religion. Placée sous l'égide de Giono, sa minuscule librairie est baptisée Les Vraies Richesses. Et pour inaugurer son catalogue, il publie le premier texte d'un inconnu : Albert Camus. Charlot exulte, ignorant encore que vouer sa vie aux livres c'est aussi la sacrifier aux aléas de l'infortune et de l'Histoire. En 2017, Ryad a le même âge que Charlot à ses débuts. Mais lui n'éprouve qu'indifférence pour la littérature. Étudiant à Paris, il est de passage à Alger avec la charge de repeindre un local poussiéreux, où les livres céderont bientôt la place à des beignets. Pourtant, vider ces lieux se révèle étrangement compliqué par la surveillance du vieil Abdallah, le gardien du temple.

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4.9/5

Algeria Is Beautiful Like America by Olivia Burton , Mahi Grand (Illustrator)

Olivia had always heard stories about Algeria from her maternal grandmother, a Black Foot (a “Pied-Noir,” the French term for Christian and Jewish settlers of French Algeria who emigrated to France after the Algerian War of Independence). After her grandmother’s death, Olivia found some of her grandmother’s journals and letters describing her homeland. Now, ten years later Olivia had always heard stories about Algeria from her maternal grandmother, a Black Foot (a “Pied-Noir,” the French term for Christian and Jewish settlers of French Algeria who emigrated to France after the Algerian War of Independence). After her grandmother’s death, Olivia found some of her grandmother’s journals and letters describing her homeland. Now, ten years later, she resolves to travel to Algeria and experience the country for herself; she arrives alone, with her grandmother’s postcards and letters in tow, and with but a single phone number in her pocket, of an Algerian Djaffar, who will act as her guide. Olivia’s quest to understand her origins will bring her to face questions about heritage, history, shame, friendship, memory, nostalgia, fantasy, the nature of exile, and our unending quest to understand who we are and where we come from.

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3.8/5

The Dictator's Last Night by Yasmina Khadra , Julian Evans (Translation) , ياسمينة خضرا

THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER ‘People say I am a megalomaniac. It is not true. I am an exceptional being, providence incarnate, envied by the gods, able to make a faith of his cause.’ October 2011. In the dying days of the Libyan civil war, Muammar Gaddafi is hiding out in his home town of Sirte along with his closest advisors. They await a convoy that will take them south, a THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER ‘People say I am a megalomaniac. It is not true. I am an exceptional being, providence incarnate, envied by the gods, able to make a faith of his cause.’ October 2011. In the dying days of the Libyan civil war, Muammar Gaddafi is hiding out in his home town of Sirte along with his closest advisors. They await a convoy that will take them south, away from encroaching rebel forces and NATO aerial attacks. The mood is sombre. In what will be his final night, Gaddafi reflects on an extraordinary life, whilst still raging against the West, his fellow Arab nations and the ingratitude of the Libyan people. In this gripping imagining of the last hours of President Gaddafi, Yasmina Khadra provides us with fascinating insight into the mind of one of the most complex and controversial figures of recent history.

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3.4/5

Paris in the Present Tense by Mark Helprin

Mark Helprin’s powerful, rapturous new novel is set in a present-day Paris caught between violent unrest and its well-known, inescapable glories. Seventy-four-year-old Jules Lacour—a maître at Paris-Sorbonne, cellist, widower, veteran of the war in Algeria, and child of the Holocaust—must find a balance between his strong obligations to the past and the attractions and bea Mark Helprin’s powerful, rapturous new novel is set in a present-day Paris caught between violent unrest and its well-known, inescapable glories. Seventy-four-year-old Jules Lacour—a maître at Paris-Sorbonne, cellist, widower, veteran of the war in Algeria, and child of the Holocaust—must find a balance between his strong obligations to the past and the attractions and beauties of life and love in the present. In the midst of what should be an effulgent time of life—days bright with music, family, rowing on the Seine—Jules is confronted headlong and all at once by a series of challenges to his principles, livelihood, and home, forcing him to grapple with his complex past and find a way forward. He risks fraud to save his terminally ill infant grandson, matches wits with a renegade insurance investigator, is drawn into an act of savage violence, and falls deeply, excitingly in love with a young cellist a third his age. Against the backdrop of an exquisite and knowing vision of Paris and the way it can uniquely shape a life, he forges a denouement that is staggering in its humanity, elegance, and truth. In the intoxicating beauty of its prose and emotional amplitude of its storytelling, Mark Helprin’s Paris in the Present Tense is a soaring achievement, a deep, dizzying look at a life through the purifying lenses of art and memory.

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4.8/5

Qu'attendent les singes by Yasmina Khadra

Une jeune étudiante est découverte assassinée dans la forêt de Baïnem, près d'Alger. Une femme, Nora Bilal, est chargée de mener l'enquête, loin de se douter que sa droiture est un danger mortel dans un pays livré aux requins en eaux troubles. Qu'attendent les singes est un voyage à travers l'Algérie d'aujourd'hui ou le Mal et le Bien se sentent à l'étroit dans la diablerie Une jeune étudiante est découverte assassinée dans la forêt de Baïnem, près d'Alger. Une femme, Nora Bilal, est chargée de mener l'enquête, loin de se douter que sa droiture est un danger mortel dans un pays livré aux requins en eaux troubles. Qu'attendent les singes est un voyage à travers l'Algérie d'aujourd'hui ou le Mal et le Bien se sentent à l'étroit dans la diablerie naturelle des hommes.

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4/5

Looking for The Stranger: Albert Camus and the Life of a Literary Classic by Alice Kaplan

The Stranger is a rite of passage for readers around the world. Since its publication in France in 1942, Camus’s novel has been translated into sixty languages and sold more than six million copies. It’s the rare novel that’s as at likely to be found in a teen’s backpack as in a graduate philosophy seminar. If the twentieth century produced a novel that could be called ubi The Stranger is a rite of passage for readers around the world. Since its publication in France in 1942, Camus’s novel has been translated into sixty languages and sold more than six million copies. It’s the rare novel that’s as at likely to be found in a teen’s backpack as in a graduate philosophy seminar. If the twentieth century produced a novel that could be called ubiquitous, The Stranger is it.   How did a young man in his twenties who had never written a novel turn out a masterpiece that still grips readers more than seventy years later? With Looking for “The Stranger”, Alice Kaplan tells that story. In the process, she reveals Camus’s achievement to have been even more impressive—and more unlikely—than even his most devoted readers knew.   Born in poverty in colonial Algeria, Camus started out as a journalist covering the criminal courts. The murder trials he attended, Kaplan shows, would be a major influence on the development and themes of The Stranger. She follows Camus to France, and, making deft use of his diaries and letters, re-creates his lonely struggle with the novel in Montmartre, where he finally hit upon the unforgettable first-person voice that enabled him to break through and complete The Stranger.   Even then, the book’s publication was far from certain. France was straining under German occupation, Camus’s closest mentor was unsure of the book’s merit, and Camus himself was suffering from near-fatal tuberculosis. Yet the book did appear, thanks in part to a resourceful publisher, Gaston Gallimard, who was undeterred by paper shortages and Nazi censorship.     The initial critical reception of The Stranger was mixed, and it wasn’t until after liberation that The Stranger began its meteoric rise. As France and the rest of the world began to move out of the shadow of war, Kaplan shows, Camus’s book— with the help of an aggressive marketing campaign by Knopf for their 1946 publication of the first English translation—became a critical and commercial success, and Camus found himself one of the most famous writers in the world. Suddenly, his seemingly modest tale of alienation was being seen for what it really was: a powerful parable of the absurd, an existentialist masterpiece.   Few books inspire devotion and excitement the way The Stranger does. And it couldn’t have a better biographer than Alice Kaplan, whose books about twentieth-century French culture and history have won her legions of fans. No reader of Camus will want to miss this brilliant exploration.  

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3.2/5

The French Intifada: The Long War Between France and Its Arabs by Andrew Hussey

A provocative rethinking of France's long relationship with the Arab world To fully understand both the social and political pressures wracking contemporary France—and, indeed, all of Europe—as well as major events from the Arab Spring in the Middle East to the tensions in Mali, Andrew Hussey believes that we have to look beyond the confines of domestic horizons. As much as A provocative rethinking of France's long relationship with the Arab world To fully understand both the social and political pressures wracking contemporary France—and, indeed, all of Europe—as well as major events from the Arab Spring in the Middle East to the tensions in Mali, Andrew Hussey believes that we have to look beyond the confines of domestic horizons. As much as unemployment, economic stagnation, and social deprivation exacerbate the ongoing turmoil in the banlieues, the root of the problem lies elsewhere: in the continuing fallout from Europe's colonial era. Combining a fascinating and compulsively readable mix of history, literature, and politics with his years of personal experience visiting the banlieues and countries across the Arab world, especially Algeria, Hussey attempts to make sense of the present situation. In the course of teasing out the myriad interconnections between past and present in Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, Beirut, and Western Europe, The French Intifada shows that the defining conflict of the twenty-first century will not be between Islam and the West but between two dramatically different experiences of the world—the colonizers and the colonized.

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4.8/5

Dieu n'habite pas La Havane by Yasmina Khadra (Editor)

A l'heure où le régime castriste s'essouffle, "Don Fuego" chante toujours dans les cabarets de La Havane. Jadis, sa voix magnifique électrisait les foules. Aujourd'hui, les temps ont changé et le roi de la rumba doit céder la place. Livré à lui-même, il rencontre Mayensi, une jeune fille "rousse et belle comme une flamme", dont il tombe éperdument amoureux. Mais le mystère A l'heure où le régime castriste s'essouffle, "Don Fuego" chante toujours dans les cabarets de La Havane. Jadis, sa voix magnifique électrisait les foules. Aujourd'hui, les temps ont changé et le roi de la rumba doit céder la place. Livré à lui-même, il rencontre Mayensi, une jeune fille "rousse et belle comme une flamme", dont il tombe éperdument amoureux. Mais le mystère qui entoure cette beauté fascinante menace leur improbable idylle. Chant dédié aux fabuleuses destinées contrariées par le sort, Dieu n'habite pas La Havane est aussi un voyage au pays de tous les paradoxes et de tous les rêves. Alliant la maîtrise et le souffle d'un Steinbeck contemporain, Yasmina Khadra mène une réflexion nostalgique sur la jeunesse perdue, sans cesse contrebalancée par la jubilation de chanter, de danser et de croire en des lendemains heureux.

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3.2/5

2084: La fin du monde by Boualem Sansal

L’Abistan, immense empire, tire son nom du prophète Abi, "délégué" de Yölah sur terre. Son système est fondé sur l’amnésie et la soumission au dieu unique. Toute pensée personnelle est bannie, un système de surveillance omniprésent permet de connaître les idées et les actes déviants. Officiellement, le peuple unanime vit dans le bonheur de la foi sans questions. Le personn L’Abistan, immense empire, tire son nom du prophète Abi, "délégué" de Yölah sur terre. Son système est fondé sur l’amnésie et la soumission au dieu unique. Toute pensée personnelle est bannie, un système de surveillance omniprésent permet de connaître les idées et les actes déviants. Officiellement, le peuple unanime vit dans le bonheur de la foi sans questions. Le personnage central, Ati, met en doute les certitudes imposées. Il se lance dans une enquête sur l’existence d’un peuple de renégats, qui vit dans des ghettos, sans le recours de la religion… Boualem Sansal s’est imposé comme une des voix majeures de la littérature contemporaine. Au fil d’un récit débridé, plein d’innocence goguenarde, d’inventions cocasses ou inquiétantes, il s’inscrit dans la filiation d’Orwell pour brocarder les dérives et l’hypocrisie du radicalisme religieux qui menace les démocraties. Grand Prix du roman de l'Académie française 2015

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4.8/5

The Stranger by Albert Camus , Matthew Ward (Translator)

Through the story of an ordinary man unwittingly drawn into a senseless murder on an Algerian beach, Camus explored what he termed "the nakedness of man faced with the absurd." First published in English in 1946; now in a new translation by Matthew Ward.

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3.8/5

The Plague by Albert Camus , Stuart Gilbert (Translator) , Olga Mărculescu (Translator)

A gripping tale of human unrelieved horror, of survival and resilience, and of the ways in which humankind confronts death, The Plague is at once a masterfully crafted novel, eloquently understated and epic in scope, and a parable of ageless moral resonance, profoundly relevant to our times. In Oran, a coastal town in North Africa, the plague begins as a series of portents A gripping tale of human unrelieved horror, of survival and resilience, and of the ways in which humankind confronts death, The Plague is at once a masterfully crafted novel, eloquently understated and epic in scope, and a parable of ageless moral resonance, profoundly relevant to our times. In Oran, a coastal town in North Africa, the plague begins as a series of portents, unheeded by the people. It gradually becomes an omnipresent reality, obliterating all traces of the past and driving its victims to almost unearthly extremes of suffering, madness, and compassion.

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4.4/5

The Meursault Investigation by Kamel Daoud , John Cullen (Translator)

He was the brother of “the Arab” killed by the infamous Meursault, the antihero of Camus’s classic novel. Seventy years after that event, Harun, who has lived since childhood in the shadow of his sibling’s memory, refuses to let him remain anonymous: he gives his brother a story and a name—Musa—and describes the events that led to Musa’s casual murder on a dazzlingly sunny He was the brother of “the Arab” killed by the infamous Meursault, the antihero of Camus’s classic novel. Seventy years after that event, Harun, who has lived since childhood in the shadow of his sibling’s memory, refuses to let him remain anonymous: he gives his brother a story and a name—Musa—and describes the events that led to Musa’s casual murder on a dazzlingly sunny beach. In a bar in Oran, night after night, he ruminates on his solitude, on his broken heart, on his anger with men desperate for a god, and on his disarray when faced with a country that has so disappointed him. A stranger among his own people, he wants to be granted, finally, the right to die. The Stranger is of course central to Daoud’s story, in which he both endorses and criticizes one of the most famous novels in the world. A worthy complement to its great predecessor, The Meursault Investigation is not only a profound meditation on Arab identity and the disastrous effects of colonialism in Algeria, but also a stunning work of literature in its own right, told in a unique and affecting voice.

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4.4/5

A Savage War of Peace: Algeria, 1954-1962 by Alistair Horne

The Algerian War lasted from 1954 to 1962. It brought down six French governments, led to the collapse of the Fourth Republic, returned de Gaulle to power, and came close to provoking a civil war on French soil. More than a million Muslim Algerians died in the conflict and as many European settlers were driven into exile. Above all, the war was marked by an unholy marriage The Algerian War lasted from 1954 to 1962. It brought down six French governments, led to the collapse of the Fourth Republic, returned de Gaulle to power, and came close to provoking a civil war on French soil. More than a million Muslim Algerians died in the conflict and as many European settlers were driven into exile. Above all, the war was marked by an unholy marriage of revolutionary terror and repressive torture.Nearly a half century has passed since this savagely fought war ended in Algerian independence, and yet ,as Alistair Horne argues in his new preface to his now-classic work of history,its repercussions continue to be felt not only in Algeria and France, but throughout the world. Indeed from today's vantage point the Algerian War looks like a full-dress rehearsal for the sort of amorphous struggle that convulsed the Balkans in the 1990s and that now ravages the Middle East, from Beirut to Baghdad struggles in which questions of religion, nationalism, imperialism, and terrorism take on a new and increasingly lethal intensity.A Savage War of Peace is the definitive history of the Algerian War, a book that brings that terrible and complicated struggle to life with intelligence, assurance, and unflagging momentum. It is essential reading for our own violent times as well as a lasting monument to the historian's art.

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4.3/5

Ce que le jour doit à la nuit by ياسمينة خضرا , Yasmina Khadra

Alors que Younes n’a que neuf ans, son père, paysan ruiné par un spéculateur autochtone, perd ses terres ancestrales. Accablé, l’homme doit se résoudre à confier son enfant à son frère, un pharmacien parfaitement intégré à la communauté pied-noir d’une petite ville de l’Oranais. Le sacrifice est immense. En abandonnant son fils, l’homme perd du même coup le respect de lui- Alors que Younes n’a que neuf ans, son père, paysan ruiné par un spéculateur autochtone, perd ses terres ancestrales. Accablé, l’homme doit se résoudre à confier son enfant à son frère, un pharmacien parfaitement intégré à la communauté pied-noir d’une petite ville de l’Oranais. Le sacrifice est immense. En abandonnant son fils, l’homme perd du même coup le respect de lui-même. Mais les yeux bleus de Younes et son physique d’ange l’aident à se faire accepter par cette communauté aisée de province. Rebaptisé Jonas, il grandit parmi de jeunes colons dont il devient l’inséparable camarade. Il découvre avec eux les joies de l’existence et partage leurs rêves d’adolescents privilégiés que ni la Seconde Guerre Mondiale ni les convulsions d’un nationalisme arabe en pleine expansion ne perturbent. Jusqu’au jour où revient au village Émilie, une jeune fille splendide qui va devenir la vestale de nos jeunes gens. Naîtra ainsi une grande histoire d’amour qui mettra à rude épreuve la complicité fraternelle des quatre garçons, écartelés entre la loyauté, l’égoïsme et la rancune que la guerre d’Indépendance va aggraver. La révolte algérienne sera, pour Younes-Jonas, sanglante et fratricide. Il refusera de laisser détruire l’amitié exceptionnelle qui l’unit à ces jeunes pieds-noirs ; il ne pourra tourner le dos à cet oncle et à cette tante qui lui ont offert une vie meilleure ; mais jamais il n’acceptera non plus de renoncer aux valeurs inculquées par son père : la fierté, la déférence envers ses ancêtres et les coutumes de son peuple, le respect absolu de la parole donnée, et, ce, quitte à mettre en péril l’amour déchirant qu’il a pour Émilie. Avec la verve romanesque qu’on lui connaît, Yasmina Khadra éclaire d’un nouveau jour ce conflit ayant opposé deux peuples amoureux d’un même pays. La grande originalité de cette saga qui se déroule de 1930 à nos jours repose sur une courageuse défense de cette double culture franco-algérienne que l’Histoire a, de part et d’autre, trop souvent cherché à renier.

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4.7/5

The Lovers of Algeria by Anouar Benmalek , Joanna Kilmartin (Translator)

A breathless story of love and survival in war-torn Algeria-past and present The devil has entered our country, and his footprints are everywhere. Nine-year-old Jallal is old enough to know that his life in Algeria is precarious at best. Having run away from home, he survives by selling peanuts and single cigarettes on the street. The proposal by the elderly Swiss woman name A breathless story of love and survival in war-torn Algeria-past and present The devil has entered our country, and his footprints are everywhere. Nine-year-old Jallal is old enough to know that his life in Algeria is precarious at best. Having run away from home, he survives by selling peanuts and single cigarettes on the street. The proposal by the elderly Swiss woman named Anna is shocking and preposterous: go to the mountains with her, as a translator, so she can find her lost lover from decades ago and pray over the graves of their murdered children. Anna and Jallal's journey is wrought with danger and unspeakable tragedy. It was under similar circumstances that Anna first met the Arab Nasreddine. Ousted from the traveling circus where she performed as a trapeze artist, she had little choice but to accept Nasreddine's dangerous offer to live with him in a makeshift tent. But it was here, amid poverty, racism, and terrifyingly random violence, that they fell in love. A best seller in France, The Lovers of Algeria is an unflinchingly candid story about a country where terrorism and government corruption are commonplace. As Anna and Nasreddine, beaten by time and memory, circle each other in Algeria, Anouar Benmalek shows with heart-wrenching detail that love can endure even the most inhuman conditions. A Lannan Translation Series Selection

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4.6/5

Fantasia: An Algerian Cavalcade by Assia Djebar , Dorothy S. Blair (Translator)

In this stunning novel, Assia Djebar intertwines the history of her native Algeria with episodes from the life of a young girl in a story stretching from the French conquest in 1830 to the War of Liberation of the 1950s. The girl, growing up in the old Roman coastal town of Cherchel, sees her life in contrast to that of a neighboring French family, and yearns for more than In this stunning novel, Assia Djebar intertwines the history of her native Algeria with episodes from the life of a young girl in a story stretching from the French conquest in 1830 to the War of Liberation of the 1950s. The girl, growing up in the old Roman coastal town of Cherchel, sees her life in contrast to that of a neighboring French family, and yearns for more than law and tradition allow her to experience. Headstrong and passionate, she escapes from the cloistered life of her family to join her brother in the maquis' fight against French domination. Djebar's exceptional descriptive powers bring to life the experiences of girls and women caught up in the dual struggle for independence--both their own and Algeria's.

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4.6/5

ذاكرة الجسد by Ahlam Mosteghanemi , أحلام مستغانمي

في حضور الوجدان تتألق معاني أحلام مستغانمي، وفي ذاكرة الجسد تتوج حضورها، حروفاً كلمات عبارات تتقاطر في حفل الغناء الروحي. موسيقاه الوطن المنبعث برغم الجراحات... مليون شهيد وثورة ومجاهد، وجزائر الثكلى بأبنائها تنبعث زوابع وعواصف الشوق والحنين في قلب خالد الرسام الذي امتشق الريشة بعد أن هوت يده التي حملت السلاح يوماً، والريشة والسلاح سيّان، كلاهما ريشة تعزف على أوتار الوطن. في حضور الوجدان تتألق معاني أحلام مستغانمي، وفي ذاكرة الجسد تتوج حضورها، حروفاً كلمات عبارات تتقاطر في حفل الغناء الروحي. موسيقاه الوطن المنبعث برغم الجراحات... مليون شهيد وثورة ومجاهد، وجزائر الثكلى بأبنائها تنبعث زوابع وعواصف الشوق والحنين في قلب خالد الرسام الذي امتشق الريشة بعد أن هوت يده التي حملت السلاح يوماً، والريشة والسلاح سيّان، كلاهما ريشة تعزف على أوتار الوطن. ففي فرنسا وعندما كان يرسم ما تراه عيناه، جسر ميرابو ونهر السين، وجد أن ما يرسمه هو جسراً آخر ووادياً آخر لمدينة أخرى هي قسنطينة، فأدرك لحظتها أنه في كل حال لا يرسم ما نسكنه، وإنما ما يسكننا. وهل كانت أحلام مستغانمي تكتب ذاكرة الجسد أم أنها تكتب ذاكرة الوطن؟!! الأمر سيّان فما الجسد إلا جزء من الوطن وما الوطن إلا هذا الجسد الساكن فيه إلى الأبد. تتقاطر الذكرى مفعمة بروح الماضي الذي يأبى إلا الحضور في كل شيء متجسداً السي طاهر التي كما عرفها خالد طفلة رجل قاد خطواته على درب الكفاح؛ عرفها أنثى... كانت من الممكن أن تكون حبيبته، زوجته، ولكنها باتت زوجة في زواج لم يحضره، تلف الذكرى الصفحات، وتتهادى العبارات ممسكة بتلابيب الذكريات دون أن توقظ النفس ملل الحضور. الوطن والحبيبة يجتمعان، والثورة والحب ينصهران في بوتقة واحدة، ومزيجهما عطاء فكري، بعيد عن الخيال، للواقع أقرب، وللإنسان في صدق مشاعره وأحاسيسه أقرب وأقرب.

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3.8/5

The German Mujahid by Boualem Sansal , Frank Wynne (Translator)

Based on a true story and inspired by the work of Primo Levi, The German Mujahid is a heartfelt reflection on guilt and the harsh imperatives of history. The two brothers Schiller, Rachel and Malrich, couldn't be more dissimilar. They were born in a small village in Algeria to a German father and an Algerian mother, and raised by an elderly uncle in one of the toughest ghe Based on a true story and inspired by the work of Primo Levi, The German Mujahid is a heartfelt reflection on guilt and the harsh imperatives of history. The two brothers Schiller, Rachel and Malrich, couldn't be more dissimilar. They were born in a small village in Algeria to a German father and an Algerian mother, and raised by an elderly uncle in one of the toughest ghettos in France. But there the similarities end. Rachel is a model immigrant - hard working, upstanding, law-abiding. Malrich has drifted. Increasingly alienated and angry, his future seems certain: incarceration at best. Then Islamic fundamentalists murder the young men's parents in Algeria and the event transforms the destinies of both brothers in unexpected ways. Rachel discovers the shocking truth about his family and buckles under the weight of the sins of his father, a former SS officer. Now Malrich, the outcast, will have to face that same awful truth alone. Banned in the author's native Algeria for of the frankness with which it confronts several explosive themes, The German Mujahid is a truly groundbreaking novel. For the first time, an Arab author directly addresses the moral implications of the Shoah. But this richly plotted novel also leaves its author room enough to address other equally controversial issues; Islamic fundamentalism and Algeria's "dirty war" of the early 1990s, for example or the emergence of grim Muslim ghettos in France's low-income housing projects. In this gripping novel, Boualem Sansal confronts these and other explosive questions with unprecedented sincerity and courage.

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3.8/5

Children of the New World by Assia Djebar , Clarisse Zimra (Afterword) , Marjolijn De Jager (Translation) , آسيا جبار

Assia Djebar, one of the most distinguished woman writers to emerge from the Arab world, wrote Children of the New World following her own involvement in the Algerian resistance to colonial French rule. Like the classic film The Battle of Algiers—enjoying renewed interest in the face of world events—Djebar’s novel sheds light on current world conflicts as it reveals a dete Assia Djebar, one of the most distinguished woman writers to emerge from the Arab world, wrote Children of the New World following her own involvement in the Algerian resistance to colonial French rule. Like the classic film The Battle of Algiers—enjoying renewed interest in the face of world events—Djebar’s novel sheds light on current world conflicts as it reveals a determined Arab insurgency against foreign occupation, from the inside out. However, Djebar focuses on the experiences of women drawn into the politics of resistance. Her novel recounts the interlocking lives of women in a rural Algerian town who find themselves joined in solidarity and empower each other to engage in the fight for independence. Narrating the resistance movement from a variety of perspectives—from those of traditional wives to liberated students to political organizers—Djebar powerfully depicts the circumstances that drive oppressed communities to violence and at the same time movingly reveals the tragic costs of war.

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3.2/5

Algerian White by Assia Djebar , David Kelley (Translation) , Marjolijn De Jager (Translation)

In Algerian White, Assia Djebar weaves a tapestry of the epic and bloody ongoing struggle in her country between Islamic fundamentalism and the post-colonial civil society. Many Algerian writers and intellectuals have died tragically and violently since the 1956 struggle for independence. They include three beloved friends of Djebar: Mahfoud Boucebi, a psychiatrist; M'Hame In Algerian White, Assia Djebar weaves a tapestry of the epic and bloody ongoing struggle in her country between Islamic fundamentalism and the post-colonial civil society. Many Algerian writers and intellectuals have died tragically and violently since the 1956 struggle for independence. They include three beloved friends of Djebar: Mahfoud Boucebi, a psychiatrist; M'Hamed Boukhobza, a sociologist; and Abdelkader Alloula, a dramatist; as well as Albert Camus. In Algerian White, Djebar finds a way to meld the personal and the political by describing in intimate detail the final days and hours of these and other Algerian men and women, many of whom were murdered merely because they were teachers, or writers, or students. Yet, for Djebar, they cannot be silenced. They continue to tell stories, smile, and endure through her defiant pen. Both fiction and memoir, Algerian White describes with unerring accuracy the lives and deaths of those whose contributions were cut short, and then probes even deeper into the meaning of friendship through imagined conversations and ghostly visitations.

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4/5

Swallows of Kabul by ياسمينة خضرا , Yasmina Khadra , John Cullen (Translator)

Since the ascendancy of the Taliban the lives of Mosheen and his beautiful wife, Zunaira, have been gradually destroyed. Mosheen's dream of becoming a diplomat has been shattered and Zunaira can no longer even appear on the streets of Kabul unveiled. Atiq is a jailer who guards those who have been condemned to death; the darkness of prison and the wretchedness of his job h Since the ascendancy of the Taliban the lives of Mosheen and his beautiful wife, Zunaira, have been gradually destroyed. Mosheen's dream of becoming a diplomat has been shattered and Zunaira can no longer even appear on the streets of Kabul unveiled. Atiq is a jailer who guards those who have been condemned to death; the darkness of prison and the wretchedness of his job have seeped into his soul. Atiq's wife, Musarrat, is suffering from an illness no doctor can cure. Yet, the lives of these four people are about to become inexplicably intertwined, through death and imprisonment to passion and extraordinary self-sacrifice. The Swallows of Kabul is an astounding and elegiac novel of four people struggling to hold on to their humanity in a place where pleasure is a deadly sin and death has become routine.

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4.1/5

The Fall by Albert Camus , Justin O'Brien (Translator)

Jean-Baptiste Clamence, a successful Parisian barrister, has come to recognize the deep-seated hypocrisy of his existence. His epigrammatic and, above all, discomforting monologue gradually saps, then undermines, the reader's own complacency.

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4.4/5

The Attack by ياسمينة خضرا , Yasmina Khadra , John T. Cullen (Translator)

Dr. Amin Jaafari, an Arab-Israeli citizen, is a surgeon at a hospital in Tel Aviv. Dedicated to his work, respected and admired by his colleagues and community, he represents integration at its most successful. He has learned to live with the violence and chaos that plague his city, and on the night of a deadly bombing in a local restaurant, he works tirelessly to help the Dr. Amin Jaafari, an Arab-Israeli citizen, is a surgeon at a hospital in Tel Aviv. Dedicated to his work, respected and admired by his colleagues and community, he represents integration at its most successful. He has learned to live with the violence and chaos that plague his city, and on the night of a deadly bombing in a local restaurant, he works tirelessly to help the shocked and shattered patients brought to the emergency room. But this night of turmoil and death takes a horrifyingly personal turn. His wife's body is found among the dead, with massive injuries, the police coldly announce, typical of those found on the bodies of fundamentalist suicide bombers. As evidence mounts that his wife, Sihem, was responsible for the catastrophic bombing, Dr. Jaafari is torn between cherished memories of their years together and the inescapable realization that the beautiful, intelligent, thoroughly modern woman he loved had a life far removed from the comfortable, assimilated existence they shared. From the graphic, beautifully rendered description of the bombing that opens the novel to the searing conclusion, The Attack portrays the reality of terrorism and its incalculable spiritual costs. Intense and humane, devoid of political bias, hatred, and polemics, it probes deep inside the Muslim world and gives readers a profound understanding of what seems impossible to understand.

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4.3/5

The Last Summer of Reason by Tahar Djaout , Marjolijn De Jager (translator)

This elegantly haunting work of fiction features bookstore owner Boualem Yekker, who lives in a country overtaken by a radically conservative party known as the Vigilant Brothers, a group that seeks to control every aspect of life according to the precepts of their rigid moral theology. The belief that no work of beauty created by humans should rival the wonders of their g This elegantly haunting work of fiction features bookstore owner Boualem Yekker, who lives in a country overtaken by a radically conservative party known as the Vigilant Brothers, a group that seeks to control every aspect of life according to the precepts of their rigid moral theology. The belief that no work of beauty created by humans should rival the wonders of their god is slowly consuming society, and the art once treasured is now despised. Boualem resists the new regime with quiet determination, using the shop and his personal history as weapons against puritanical forces. Readers are taken into the lush depths of the bookseller's dreams, the memories of his now empty family life, and his passion for literature, then yanked back into the terror and drudgery of his daily routine by the vandalism, assaults, and death warrants that afflict him. "Books have been the compost in which Boualem's life ripened, to the point where his bookish hands and his carnal hands, his paper body and his body of flesh and blood very often overlap and mingle. In the end Boualem himself didn't see a clear distinction any more. He has met so many characters in books, he has come in contact with so many destinies that his own life would be nothing without them." Marketing plans for "The Last Summer of Reason": A percentage of proceeds go to ABFFE. Joint promotions with ABFFE and member stores, including highlight in "Bookselling This Week," Galley mailing & BookSense Galley Program participation National advertising Co-op available Tahar Djaout was considered one of the most promising writers of his generation, and was a firm believer in democracy. Djaout's murder wasattributed to the Islamic Salvation Front, who reported that he was killed because he "wielded a fearsome pen." He is the author of eleven books, including the novel "Les vigiles," which won the Prix Mediterrane.

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