Popular Peninsula Campaign Books

10+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Peninsula Campaign

Discover the list of some best books written on Peninsula Campaign by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Peninsula Campaign highly popular among the readers worldwide.

5/5

To the Gates of Richmond: The Peninsula Campaign by Stephen W. Sears

This is a history of the largest and bloodiest campaign of the American Civil War - one in which a quarter of a million men fought, and one in four died.

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3.3/5

The Battle of Glendale: Robert E. Lee's Lost Opportunity by Douglas Crenshaw

By late June 1862, the Union army, under George B. McClellan, stood at the doorstep of Richmond. In a desperate hour for the Confederate capital, Robert E. Lee attacked McClellan and drove the Union army into a full retreat toward the safety of the James River. Lee recognized an opportunity to seal a decisive victory and commanded his Army of Northern Virginia to prevent t By late June 1862, the Union army, under George B. McClellan, stood at the doorstep of Richmond. In a desperate hour for the Confederate capital, Robert E. Lee attacked McClellan and drove the Union army into a full retreat toward the safety of the James River. Lee recognized an opportunity to seal a decisive victory and commanded his Army of Northern Virginia to prevent the Union forces from retreating. A.P. Hill, James Longstreet and "Stonewall" Jackson were among those who engaged in the harrowing day of battle during the Seven Days" Campaign. Author Douglas Crenshaw details the dramatic Battle of Glendale in the Civil War.

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4.1/5

The Battle of Glendale: The Day the South Nearly Won the Civil War by Jim Stempel

It is commonly accepted that the South could never have won the Civil War. By chronicling perhaps the best of the South's limited opportunities to turn the tide, this provocative study argues that Confederate victory was indeed possible. On June 30, 1862, at a small Virginia crossroads known as Glendale, Confederate forces under Robert E. Lee sliced the retreating Army of It is commonly accepted that the South could never have won the Civil War. By chronicling perhaps the best of the South's limited opportunities to turn the tide, this provocative study argues that Confederate victory was indeed possible. On June 30, 1862, at a small Virginia crossroads known as Glendale, Confederate forces under Robert E. Lee sliced the retreating Army of the Potomac in two and came remarkably close to destroying their Federal foe. Only a string of command miscues on the part of the Confederates--and a stunning command failure by Stonewall Jackson--enabled the Union army to escape a defeat that day, one that may well have vaulted the South to its independence. Never before or after would the Confederacy come as close to transforming American history as it did at the Battle of Glendale.

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4.4/5

The Battle Of Seven Pines, May 31 June 1, 1862 (Virginia Civil War Battles & Leaders) by Steven H. Newton

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3.6/5

Extraordinary Circumstances: The Seven Days Battles by Brian K. Burton

The first campaign in the Civil War in which Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia, the Seven Days Battles were fought southeast of the Confederate capital of Richmond in the summer of 1862. Lee and his fellow officers, including "Stonewall" Jackson, James Longstreet, A. P. Hill, and D. H. Hill, pushed George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac from the gates of R The first campaign in the Civil War in which Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia, the Seven Days Battles were fought southeast of the Confederate capital of Richmond in the summer of 1862. Lee and his fellow officers, including "Stonewall" Jackson, James Longstreet, A. P. Hill, and D. H. Hill, pushed George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac from the gates of Richmond to the James River, where the Union forces reached safety. Along the way, Lee lost several opportunities to harm McClellan. The Seven Days have been the subject of numerous historical treatments, but none more detailed and engaging than Brian K. Burton's retelling of the campaign that lifted Southern spirits, began Lee's ascent to fame, and almost prompted European recognition of the Confederacy.

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3/5

A Pitiless Rain: The Battle of Williamsburg, 1862 by David Hastings , Earl C. Hastings

The intensity and significance of the Battle of Williamsburg on May 4 and 5, 1862, are often underestimated and misunderstood. Previously understood only as a rear guard action on the way to Richmond and overshadowed by the events of the Seven Days, it was in fact a savage two days' engagement which at its height involved more than 20,000 troops in combat. This is the firs The intensity and significance of the Battle of Williamsburg on May 4 and 5, 1862, are often underestimated and misunderstood. Previously understood only as a rear guard action on the way to Richmond and overshadowed by the events of the Seven Days, it was in fact a savage two days' engagement which at its height involved more than 20,000 troops in combat. This is the first full length book to treat the battle in all its strategic importance. The authors draw heavily on original sources to reconstruct the action and to highlight the stories of military and civilian participants in the battle and its aftermath. That original material offers new insights into events associated with the Battle of Williamsburg. An extensive appendix describes the location of the battlefield and includes descriptions of key sites which still exist.

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5/5

Joseph E. Johnston and the Defense of Richmond by Steven H. Newton

Most often viewed as a prelude to Robert E. Lee's Civil War victories of 1862, Joseph E. Johnston's campaign in Virginia early that year has been considered uninspired at best, catastrophic at worst. Steven Newton now offers a revisionist account of Johnston's operations between the York and James Rivers to show how his performance in the "Peninsular War contributed to a c Most often viewed as a prelude to Robert E. Lee's Civil War victories of 1862, Joseph E. Johnston's campaign in Virginia early that year has been considered uninspired at best, catastrophic at worst. Steven Newton now offers a revisionist account of Johnston's operations between the York and James Rivers to show how his performance in the "Peninsular War contributed to a crucial strategic victory for the Confederacy.

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3.7/5

Seven Days Battles 1862: Lee’s defense of Richmond by Angus Konstam

Osprey's examination of the short yet crucial campaign of the American Civil War (1861-1865). When General Robert E. Lee took command of the Army of Northern Virginia, the Confederacy was in crisis. Lee changed all that in a brilliant, week-long campaign. On 26 June the Confederates struck, fighting two hard-fought battles in two days at Mechanicsville and Gaine's Mill. Th Osprey's examination of the short yet crucial campaign of the American Civil War (1861-1865). When General Robert E. Lee took command of the Army of Northern Virginia, the Confederacy was in crisis. Lee changed all that in a brilliant, week-long campaign. On 26 June the Confederates struck, fighting two hard-fought battles in two days at Mechanicsville and Gaine's Mill. The ferocity of the Confederate assaults convinced McClellan that he was outnumbered. Unable to keep the Confederates at bay, the Union army was recalled to Washington. Despite losing a quarter of his men, Lee had saved Richmond, and inflicted a humiliating defeat on the Army of the Potomac.

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4.7/5

The Seven Days: The Emergence of Lee by Clifford Dowdey

During the Seven Days Campaign--the series of battles fought near Richmond at the end of June 1862--General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia routed General George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac. Although the Confederates repulsed the powerful offensive of the Yankees, they failed to win a complete and decisive victory. The campaign had far-reaching consequence During the Seven Days Campaign--the series of battles fought near Richmond at the end of June 1862--General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia routed General George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac. Although the Confederates repulsed the powerful offensive of the Yankees, they failed to win a complete and decisive victory. The campaign had far-reaching consequences for both sides: depriving McClellan of a military decision meant the war would continue for two more years, and the chance for Southern victory would never come again. The Seven Days memorably depicts a turning point in the war and in American history.

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3.1/5

Fair Oaks 1862: McClellan's Peninsular Campaign by Angus Konstam

Following its humiliating defeat at the First Battle of Bull Run, General George B. McClellan took command of the Union Army of the Potomac. In the spring of 1862, having rebuilt his forces, the "Little Napoleon" devised a plan to end the war in a single campaign. Transporting his army by sea to the Virginia Peninsula, he would outflank Confederate forces and march unoppos Following its humiliating defeat at the First Battle of Bull Run, General George B. McClellan took command of the Union Army of the Potomac. In the spring of 1862, having rebuilt his forces, the "Little Napoleon" devised a plan to end the war in a single campaign. Transporting his army by sea to the Virginia Peninsula, he would outflank Confederate forces and march unopposed on Richmond, the Southern capital. Excessive caution squandered the opportunity, however, and on 31 May the Confederates struck at McClellan’s divided forces at Fair Oaks. This book details McClellan’s controversial Peninsula campaign and the southern attempt to halt the Union juggernaut.

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