Popular Benin Books

15+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Benin

Discover the list of some best books written on Benin by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Benin highly popular among the readers worldwide.

3.5/5

Say You're One of Them by Uwem Akpan

Uwem Akpan's stunning stories humanize the perils of poverty and violence so piercingly that few readers will feel they've ever encountered Africa so immediately. The eight-year-old narrator of "An Ex-Mas Feast" needs only enough money to buy books and pay fees in order to attend school. Even when his twelve-year-old sister takes to the streets to raise these meager funds, Uwem Akpan's stunning stories humanize the perils of poverty and violence so piercingly that few readers will feel they've ever encountered Africa so immediately. The eight-year-old narrator of "An Ex-Mas Feast" needs only enough money to buy books and pay fees in order to attend school. Even when his twelve-year-old sister takes to the streets to raise these meager funds, his dream can't be granted. Food comes first. His family lives in a street shanty in Nairobi, Kenya, but their way of both loving and taking advantage of each other strikes a universal chord. In the second of his stories published in a New Yorker special fiction issue, Akpan takes us far beyond what we thought we knew about the tribal conflict in Rwanda. The story is told by a young girl, who, with her little brother, witnesses the worst possible scenario between parents. They are asked to do the previously unimaginable in order to protect their children. This singular collection will also take the reader inside Nigeria, Benin, and Ethiopia, revealing in beautiful prose the harsh consequences for children of life in Africa. Akpan's voice is a literary miracle, rendering lives of almost unimaginable deprivation and terror into stories that are nothing short of transcendent.

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3.7/5

Snares Without End by Olympe Bhêly-Quenum

A novel, also a philosophical tale in which destiny entraps the innocent protagonist and holds him fast. A man's life is ruined when he is unjustly accused of adultery.

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3.3/5

Dawn to Dusk: Folktales from Benin by Iro Eweka

This collection of Edo (or Benin) folk tales is an oral history of Edo culture and tradition. It tells the story of how the ancient Edo conceived of the world and how they attempted both to explain the origins of their human existence on earth and to interpret their environment.

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3.6/5

Show Me the Magic: Travels Round Benin by Taxi by Annie Caulfield

This is a travel book about Dahomey (Benin) - an inhospitable country in Africa where corruption is rife and where Catholicism shares a place with Gri Gri, the local Voodoo. The muslim north of the country is arid and tough, whereas the south is colourful, sophisticated and artistic. The countryside ranges from pretty English rural, to arid sub-Sahara. Annie experiences th This is a travel book about Dahomey (Benin) - an inhospitable country in Africa where corruption is rife and where Catholicism shares a place with Gri Gri, the local Voodoo. The muslim north of the country is arid and tough, whereas the south is colourful, sophisticated and artistic. The countryside ranges from pretty English rural, to arid sub-Sahara. Annie experiences this country of contrasts from the back seat of a taxi driven by a wacky control freak called Isidore.

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4.9/5

The Viceroy of Ouidah by Bruce Chatwin

In 1812, Francisco Manoel da Silva, escaping a life of poverty in Brazil, sailed to the African kingdom of Dahomey, determined to make his fortune in the slave trade. Armed with nothing but an iron will, he became a man of substance in Ouidah and the founder of a remarkable dynasty. His one remaining ambition is to return to Brazil in triumph, but his friendship with the m In 1812, Francisco Manoel da Silva, escaping a life of poverty in Brazil, sailed to the African kingdom of Dahomey, determined to make his fortune in the slave trade. Armed with nothing but an iron will, he became a man of substance in Ouidah and the founder of a remarkable dynasty. His one remaining ambition is to return to Brazil in triumph, but his friendship with the mad, mercurial king of Dahomey is fraught with danger and threatens his dream.

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4.5/5

Instruments of Darkness by Robert Wilson , Anthony Sheil

From the author of the national bestseller A Small Death in Lisbon and The Company of Strangers comes Wilson's compelling first novel, never before available in the United States. Bruce Medway's existence as a fixer and troubleshooter had been tough, but never life-threatening until he crossed paths with the mighty Madame Severnou. His life becomes even more complicated by From the author of the national bestseller A Small Death in Lisbon and The Company of Strangers comes Wilson's compelling first novel, never before available in the United States. Bruce Medway's existence as a fixer and troubleshooter had been tough, but never life-threatening until he crossed paths with the mighty Madame Severnou. His life becomes even more complicated by his search for a missing fellow expat, Steven Kershaw. Against a backdrop of political disruption and endemic official corruption, Medway pursues the elusive phantom of Kershaw. Instruments of Darkness powerfully evokes the atmosphere, politics, and people of West Africa. With Medway's ironic voice, flashes of humor that may recall Raymond Chandler, and unforgettable characters, this compulsively readable thriller is the beginning of a remarkable series.

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4.7/5

Why Goats Smell Bad and Other Stories from Benin by Raouf Mama , Imna Arroyo (illustrator)

A collection of nineteen folk stories from the Fon people of Benin, about orphans and twins with magical associations, spirits, animals, royalty, and farmers.

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3.9/5

Fools, Thieves and Other Dreamers: Stories from Francophone Africa by Florent Couao-Zotti , Abdourahman A. Waberi , Seydi Sow

This is a rare achievement: translation of contemporary francophone African literature into English, and published within Africa, with the aim of promoting greater understanding and links across the continent. The impetus came from the focus on francophone Africa at the Zimbabwe International Book Fair 2001. Supported by the French Embassy, three lecturers at the Universit This is a rare achievement: translation of contemporary francophone African literature into English, and published within Africa, with the aim of promoting greater understanding and links across the continent. The impetus came from the focus on francophone Africa at the Zimbabwe International Book Fair 2001. Supported by the French Embassy, three lecturers at the University of Zimbabwe, assisted by nineteen students, undertook the translations of three short stories. The writers are Seydi Sow from Senegal, Florent Couao-Zotti from Benin, and Abdourahman Ali Waberi from Djibouti. Couao-Zotti's story 'Small Hells on Street Corners', was shortlisted for the Caine Prize for African Writing, 2002.

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4.3/5

The Slave Dancer by Paula Fox

Jessie Bollier often played his fife to earn a few pennies down by the New Orleans docks. One afternoon a sailor asked him to pipe a tune, and that evening Jessie was kidnapped and dumped aboard "The Moonlight," a slave ship, where a hateful duty awaited him. He was to play music so the slaves could "dance" to keep their muscles strong, their bodies profitable. Jessie was Jessie Bollier often played his fife to earn a few pennies down by the New Orleans docks. One afternoon a sailor asked him to pipe a tune, and that evening Jessie was kidnapped and dumped aboard "The Moonlight," a slave ship, where a hateful duty awaited him. He was to play music so the slaves could "dance" to keep their muscles strong, their bodies profitable. Jessie was sickened by the thought of taking part in the business of trading rum and tobacco for blacks and then selling the ones who survived the frightful sea voyage from Africa. But to the men of the ship a "slave dancer" was necessary to ensure their share of the profit. They did not heed the horrors that every day grew more vivid, more inescapable to Jessie. Yet, even after four months of fear, calculated torture, and hazardous sailing with a degraded crew, Jessie was to face a final horror that would stay with him for the rest of his life.

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5/5

Butterfly Fish by Irenosen Okojie

With wry humour and a deft touch, Butterfly Fish, the outstanding first novel by a stunning new writer, is a work of elegant and captivating storytelling. A dual narrative set in contemporary London and 18th century Benin in Africa, the book traverses the realms of magic realism with luminous style and graceful, effortless prose.

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3.7/5

When Gods Bleed by Njedeh Anthony

When Gods Bleed takes you into the world surrounding three kings in the year 1496 at West Africa. The first balancing tradition and politics to stabilize a kingdom and remain in power, the second wrestling sacrifice and destiny to rule a kingdom and the third, observing the change of a nation by parties armed with honor, greed, power, loyalty and love, to change the hegemo When Gods Bleed takes you into the world surrounding three kings in the year 1496 at West Africa. The first balancing tradition and politics to stabilize a kingdom and remain in power, the second wrestling sacrifice and destiny to rule a kingdom and the third, observing the change of a nation by parties armed with honor, greed, power, loyalty and love, to change the hegemony. A King dies leaving behind two underage sons, vying for the throne. We trail the journey of two powerful queens determined to coronate their sons as the next king

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3.8/5

Only One Cowry: A Dahomean Tale by Phillis Gershator , David Soman (Illustrator)

Dada Segbo, the first king of Dahomey, wants a bride. He can afford the finest gifts to bestow upon her family, but he prefers not to part with any of his wealth. So he offers only one cowry shell. How can he find a worthy bride for such a pittance?"I will find the king a wife for only one cowry", promises Yo, a smart young fellow. And, trade by trade, he does. But Yo isn' Dada Segbo, the first king of Dahomey, wants a bride. He can afford the finest gifts to bestow upon her family, but he prefers not to part with any of his wealth. So he offers only one cowry shell. How can he find a worthy bride for such a pittance?"I will find the king a wife for only one cowry", promises Yo, a smart young fellow. And, trade by trade, he does. But Yo isn't the only clever bargainer in the kingdom. Freely based on African folklore and vibrantly illustrated, this witty cumulative tale features an appealing pair of perfectly matched deal makers.

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4.9/5

Why Monkeys Live in Trees and Other Stories from Benin by Raouf Mama , Andy Jones (illustrator)

This is a book for both young and old lovers of folklore. Why Monkeys Live in Trees and Other Stories from Benin is a rich tapestry of oral tales that come from a wide range of Beninese ethnic groups. They include trickster tales and sacred tales involving the greatest and meanest of mankind, as well as nature and the world of spirits. These ageless tales remind us of the This is a book for both young and old lovers of folklore. Why Monkeys Live in Trees and Other Stories from Benin is a rich tapestry of oral tales that come from a wide range of Beninese ethnic groups. They include trickster tales and sacred tales involving the greatest and meanest of mankind, as well as nature and the world of spirits. These ageless tales remind us of the power of love, the perils of greed and pride, and the redemptive virtues of courage, humility, and kindness. The Western African Republic of Benin (formerly Dahomey) is gifted with a great folktale tradition, one of the richest in the world. As pieces of oral literature and cultural history, these tales shed light on some of the values and beliefs as well as the customs and traditions of the people of Benin

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4.1/5

Wives of the Leopard: Gender, Politics, and Culture in the Kingdom of Dahomey by Edna G. Bay

"Wives of the Leopard" explores power and culture in a pre-colonial West African state whose army of women and practice of human sacrifice earned it notoriety in the racist imagination of late nineteenth-century Europe and America. Tracing two hundred years of the history of Dahomey up to the French colonial conquest in 1894, the book follows change in two central institut "Wives of the Leopard" explores power and culture in a pre-colonial West African state whose army of women and practice of human sacrifice earned it notoriety in the racist imagination of late nineteenth-century Europe and America. Tracing two hundred years of the history of Dahomey up to the French colonial conquest in 1894, the book follows change in two central institutions. One was the monarchy, the coalitions of men and women who seized and wielded power in the name of the king. The second was the palace, a household of several thousand wives of the king who supported and managed state functions. Looking at Dahomey against the backdrop of the Atlantic slave trade and the growth of European imperialism, Edan G. Bay reaches for a distinctly Dahomean perspective as she weaves together evidence drawn from travelers' memoirs and local oral accounts, from the religious practices of vodun, and from ethnographic studies of the twentieth century. Wives of the Leopard thoroughly integrates gender into the political analysis of state systems, effectively creating a social history of power. More broadly, it argues that women as a whole and men of the lower classes were gradually squeezed out of access to power as economic resources contracted with the decline of the slave trade in the nineteenth century. In these and other ways, the book provides an accessible portrait of Dahomey's complex and fascinating culture without exoticizing it.

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4.9/5

Non sta al porco dire che l'ovile è sporco by Florent Couao-Zotti , Claudia Ortenzi (Translator)

La notte dura un secolo a Cotonou. A caccia dell’assassino di una squillo d’alto bordo e di una valigetta piena di polvere d’angelo ci sono, per scopi diversi, il commissario Santos e l’ispettore Kakanakou; Smaïn detto l’Arabo, un faccendiere arricchitosi chissà come; l’agente di sicurezza Sdk e due femme fatale puttane di professione. La forza di questo romanzo esilarante La notte dura un secolo a Cotonou. A caccia dell’assassino di una squillo d’alto bordo e di una valigetta piena di polvere d’angelo ci sono, per scopi diversi, il commissario Santos e l’ispettore Kakanakou; Smaïn detto l’Arabo, un faccendiere arricchitosi chissà come; l’agente di sicurezza Sdk e due femme fatale puttane di professione. La forza di questo romanzo esilarante e pulp sta nello slittamento continuo della storia, che si dipana nel recinto di una Cotonou irrazionale, cortile di un’Africa contemporanea stanca di inghiottire gli scarti dell’Occidente.

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