Popular Civil War Eastern Theater Books

15+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Civil War Eastern Theater

Discover the list of some best books written on Civil War Eastern Theater by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Civil War Eastern Theater highly popular among the readers worldwide.

3.7/5

The New Gettysburg Campaign Handbook: Facts, Photos, and Artwork for Readers of All Ages, June 9 - July 14, 1863 (Savas Beatie Handbook) by J. David Petruzzi , Steven Stanley

The New Gettysburg Campaign Handbookis an informative full-color guide for American Civil War and Gettysburg enthusiasts of all ages. Authors J. David Petruzzi and Steven Stanley use clear and concise writing broken down into short and easy to understand chapters complete with original maps, modern and historic photographs, tables, charts, and artwork to narrate the histor The New Gettysburg Campaign Handbookis an informative full-color guide for American Civil War and Gettysburg enthusiasts of all ages. Authors J. David Petruzzi and Steven Stanley use clear and concise writing broken down into short and easy to understand chapters complete with original maps, modern and historic photographs, tables, charts, and artwork to narrate the history of the Gettysburg Campaign from the opening battle at Brandy StationinVirginia on June 9, 1863, to the escape of Gen. Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia across the Potomac River on July 14, 1863. Chapters include quotes of interest from participants, tables and charts of the ages and seniority ranking of the generals of both sides; weather observations during the battle; a stunning photographic study of the entire campaign; a discussion of the battle's myths and controversies; biographies of select officers, civilians, and battlefield photographers; trivia about the campaign; a comprehensive order of battle; a suggested reading list and websites; and much more. As enjoyable to look at as it is easy to use, every casual and serious student of the Civil War and Gettysburg will want a copy of The New Gettysburg Campaign Handbook as a constant companion while reading other books on the campaign—and even as a supplement and general field guide while walking the hallowed Pennsylvania ground.

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4.7/5

The Wilderness Campaign by Gary W. Gallagher (Editor)

In the spring of 1864 in the vast scrub forest that spread south from Virginia's Rapidan and Rappahannock Rivers, Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee met in battle for the first time. The Wilderness campaign of May 5-6 initiated an epic confrontation between these two commanders - one that would finally end, eleven months later, with Lee's surrender at Appomattox. The contr In the spring of 1864 in the vast scrub forest that spread south from Virginia's Rapidan and Rappahannock Rivers, Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee met in battle for the first time. The Wilderness campaign of May 5-6 initiated an epic confrontation between these two commanders - one that would finally end, eleven months later, with Lee's surrender at Appomattox. The contributors to this volume bring modern scholarship and fresh insight to bear on the issues and leaders of the Wilderness campaign. Their essays explore the campaign's background, for example, by training an often revisionist lens on expectations among civilians in the North and South, morale among officers and soldiers in both armies, and the strategic plans of Lee and Grant. Other essays assess the shaky performances of Union cavalry leaders Philip H. Sheridan and James Harrison Wilson, the controversial actions of Confederate corp commanders Richard S. Ewell and A. P. Hill, and the often overlooked service of Lewis A. Grant and his Vermont Brigade. Finally, two of the most famous elements of the fighting in the Wilderness - the "Lee to the Rear" episode and James Longstreet's flank attack - are reconstructed in impressive detail.

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4.1/5

Before Antietam: The Battle for South Mountain by John Michael Priest

Robert E. Lee, after decisively repelling John Pope's August 1862 invasion of Virginia at the Second Battle of Manassas, took the offensive. Moving north into Maryland, Lee divided his forces to capture Harpers Ferry while continuing his advance further into Union territory. George B. McClellan, the new Union commander, learned that Lee had divided his forces, and advanced Robert E. Lee, after decisively repelling John Pope's August 1862 invasion of Virginia at the Second Battle of Manassas, took the offensive. Moving north into Maryland, Lee divided his forces to capture Harpers Ferry while continuing his advance further into Union territory. George B. McClellan, the new Union commander, learned that Lee had divided his forces, and advanced to attack the Confederates. The armies, from squad to corps level, fought hard in both cavalry and infantry actions for control of the three gaps across South Mountain, about sixty miles from the Federal capital. The victory McClellan's officers and men gave him forced Lee to fall back and regroup near the town of Sharpsburg, Maryland, thus setting the stage for the Civil War's bloodiest day which soon followed at Antietam Creek. Three days before that September day, the opposing armies fought a series of engagements that came to be known as the Battle of South Mountain. Until Before Antietam, those battles existed in our history as only a footnote to the events at Antietam. Because of the work of John Michael Priest those terrible encounters now have their rightful place in American military history.

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4.7/5

Battle at Bull Run: A History of the First Major Campaign of the Civil War by William C. Davis

The first major history ever written on the first battle of the Civil War, this narrative describes the chaotic fighting by courageous amateurs that nearly resulted in Confederate independence.

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3.2/5

The Battle of the Wilderness May 5-6, 1864 by Gordon C. Rhea

Fought in a tangled forest fringing the south bank of the Rapidan River, the Battle of the Wilderness marked the initial engagement in the climactic months of the Civil War in Virginia, and the first encounter between Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee. In an exciting narrative, Gordon C. Rhea provides the consummate recounting of that conflict of May 5 and 6, 1864, which Fought in a tangled forest fringing the south bank of the Rapidan River, the Battle of the Wilderness marked the initial engagement in the climactic months of the Civil War in Virginia, and the first encounter between Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee. In an exciting narrative, Gordon C. Rhea provides the consummate recounting of that conflict of May 5 and 6, 1864, which ended with high casualties on both sides but no clear victor. With its balanced analysis of events and people, command structures and strategies, The Battle of the Wilderness is operational history as it should be written.

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4/5

Chancellorsville by Stephen W. Sears

Sears describes the series of controversial events that define this crucial battle, including General Robert E. Lee's radical decision to divide his small army - a violation of basic military rules - sending Stonewall Jackson on his famous march around the Union army flank. Jackson's death - accidentally shot by one of his own soldiers - is one of the many fascinating stor Sears describes the series of controversial events that define this crucial battle, including General Robert E. Lee's radical decision to divide his small army - a violation of basic military rules - sending Stonewall Jackson on his famous march around the Union army flank. Jackson's death - accidentally shot by one of his own soldiers - is one of the many fascinating stories included in this definitive account of the battle of Chancellorsville.

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3.3/5

Gettysburg by Stephen W. Sears

A masterful, single-volume history of the Civil War's greatest campaign. Drawing on original source material, from soldiers' letters to official military records of the war, Stephen W. Sears's Gettysburg is a remarkable and dramatic account of the legendary campaign. He takes particular care in his study of the battle's leaders and offers detailed analyses of their strateg A masterful, single-volume history of the Civil War's greatest campaign. Drawing on original source material, from soldiers' letters to official military records of the war, Stephen W. Sears's Gettysburg is a remarkable and dramatic account of the legendary campaign. He takes particular care in his study of the battle's leaders and offers detailed analyses of their strategies and tactics, depicting both General Meade's heroic performance in his first week of army command and General Lee's role in the agonizing failure of the Confederate army. With characteristic style and insight, Sears brings the epic tale of the battle in Pennsylvania vividly to life.

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3.6/5

The Gettysburg Campaign: A Study in Command by Edwin B. Coddington

The Battle of Gettyburg remains one of the most controversial military actions in America's history, and one of the most studied. Professor Coddington's is an analysis not only of the battle proper, but of the actions of both Union and Confederate armies for the six months prior to the battle and the factors affecting General Meade’s decision not to pursue the retreating Co The Battle of Gettyburg remains one of the most controversial military actions in America's history, and one of the most studied. Professor Coddington's is an analysis not only of the battle proper, but of the actions of both Union and Confederate armies for the six months prior to the battle and the factors affecting General Meade’s decision not to pursue the retreating Confederate forces. This book contends that Gettyburg was a crucial Union victory, primarily because of the effective leadership of Union forces—not, as has often been said, only because the North was the beneficiary of Lee's mistakes.

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3.9/5

The Gleam of Bayonets: The Battle of Antietam and Robert E. Lee's Maryland Campaign, September 1862 by James V. Murfin , Scott Hartwig , James I. Robertson Jr. (Introduction)

One of the bloodiest days in American military history, the Battle of Antietam turned the tide of the Civil War in favor of the North and delivered the first major defeat to Robert E. Lee's army. In The Gleam of Bayonets, James V. Murfin gives a compelling account of the events and personalities involved in this momentous battle. The gentleness and patience of Lincoln, th One of the bloodiest days in American military history, the Battle of Antietam turned the tide of the Civil War in favor of the North and delivered the first major defeat to Robert E. Lee's army. In The Gleam of Bayonets, James V. Murfin gives a compelling account of the events and personalities involved in this momentous battle. The gentleness and patience of Lincoln, the vacillations of McClellan, and the grandeur of Lee--all unfold before the reader. The battle itself is presented with precision and scope as Murfin blends together atmosphere and fact, emotions and tactics, into a dramatic and coherent whole. Originally published in 1965, The Gleam of Bayonets is now recognized as a classic and the standard against which all books on Antietam are measured.

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4.5/5

The First Day at Gettysburg: Essays on Confederate and Union Leadership by Gary W. Gallagher (Editor)

The Battle of Gettysburg exerts a unique hold on the national imagination. Many writers have argued that it represented the turning point of the Civil War, after which Confederate fortunes moved inexorably toward defeat. Successive generations of historians have not exhausted the topic of leadership at Gettysburg, especially with regard to the first day of the battle. Ofte The Battle of Gettysburg exerts a unique hold on the national imagination. Many writers have argued that it represented the turning point of the Civil War, after which Confederate fortunes moved inexorably toward defeat. Successive generations of historians have not exhausted the topic of leadership at Gettysburg, especially with regard to the first day of the battle. Often overshadowed by more famous events on the second and third days, the initial phase of the contest offers the most interesting problems of leadership, including Lee's strategy and tactics, the conduct of Confederate corps commanders Richard S. Ewell and A. P. Hill, Oliver Otis Howard's role on the Union side, and a series of notable debacles among Lee's brigadiers. Drawing on a range of sources, the contributors combine interpretation and fresh evidence that should challenge students of the battle, Civil War buffs, and military historians to reconsider their understanding of the events of July 1, 1863.

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4.5/5

The Fredericksburg Campaign: Winter War on the Rappahannock by Francis Augustin O'Reilly

The battle at Fredericksburg, Virginia, in December 1862 involved hundreds of thousands of men; produced staggering, unequal casualties (13,000 Federal soldiers compared to 4,500 Confederates); ruined the career of Ambrose E. Burnside; embarrassed Abraham Lincoln; and distinguished Robert E. Lee as one of the greatest military strategists of his era. Francis Augustin O'Rei The battle at Fredericksburg, Virginia, in December 1862 involved hundreds of thousands of men; produced staggering, unequal casualties (13,000 Federal soldiers compared to 4,500 Confederates); ruined the career of Ambrose E. Burnside; embarrassed Abraham Lincoln; and distinguished Robert E. Lee as one of the greatest military strategists of his era. Francis Augustin O'Reilly draws upon his intimate knowledge of the battlegrounds to discuss the unprecedented nature of Fredericksburg's warfare. Lauded for its vivid description, trenchant analysis, and meticulous research, his award-winning book makes for compulsive reading.

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4.7/5

Davis and Lee at War by Steven E. Woodworth

Steven Woodworth's previous book, the critically acclaimed "Jefferson Davis and His Generals," won the prestigious Fletcher Pratt Award and was a main selection of the History Book Club. In that book he showed how the failures of Davis and his military leaders in the west paved the way for Confederate defeat. In Davis and Lee at War, he concludes his study of Davis as rebe Steven Woodworth's previous book, the critically acclaimed "Jefferson Davis and His Generals," won the prestigious Fletcher Pratt Award and was a main selection of the History Book Club. In that book he showed how the failures of Davis and his military leaders in the west paved the way for Confederate defeat. In Davis and Lee at War, he concludes his study of Davis as rebel commander-in-chief and shows how the lack of a unified purpose and strategy in the east sealed the Confederacy's fate. Woodworth argues that Davis and Robert E. Lee, the South's greatest military leader, had sharply conflicting views over the proper conduct of the war. Davis was convinced that the South should fight a defensive war, to simply outlast the North's political and popular support for the war. By contrast, Lee and the other eastern generals-notably P.G.T. Beauregard, Gustavus Smith, and Stonewall Jackson-were eager for the offensive. They were convinced that only quick and decisive battlefield victories would prevent the North from eventually defeating them with its overwhelming advantage in men and materials. Davis and Lee, Woodworth shows, shared a mutual respect for each other for most of the war. But it was respect mixed with a stubborn resistance to the other's influence. The result of this tense tug-of-war was Davis's misguided pursuit of a middle ground that gave neither strategy its best chance for success. The war finally ground to a bloody conclusion with Davis as indecisive as ever and virtually blind to how little confidence his generals had in his leadership. Drawing extensively upon the papers of Jefferson Davis and the works of leading Civil War historians, Woodworth places the eastern military campaigns in an entirely new light and expands our understanding of Davis as leader of the Confederacy.

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4.7/5

Battle of Big Bethel: Crucial Clash in Early Civil War Virginia by J. Michael Cobb , Edward Hicks , Wythe Holt

Battle of Big Bethel: Crucial Clash in Early Civil War Virginia by J. Michael Cobb, Edward B. Hicks, and Wythe Holt is the first full-length treatment of the small but consequential June 10, 1861, battle that reshaped both Northern and Southern perceptions about what lay in store for the divided nation. In the spring of 1861, many people in the North and South imagined tha Battle of Big Bethel: Crucial Clash in Early Civil War Virginia by J. Michael Cobb, Edward B. Hicks, and Wythe Holt is the first full-length treatment of the small but consequential June 10, 1861, battle that reshaped both Northern and Southern perceptions about what lay in store for the divided nation. In the spring of 1861, many people in the North and South imagined that the Civil War would be short and nearly bloodless. The first planned engagement of the war at Big Bethel, however, provided undeniable evidence of just how wrong popular opinion could be. Major General Benjamin F. Butler was in command of Union forces at Fort Monroe, Virginia, at the tip of the peninsula between the James and York rivers only ninety miles from the Confederate capital at Richmond. Thanks to the foresight of Lt. Gen. Winfield Scott, President Abraham Lincoln's elderly chief military adviser, thousands of troops had been assigned to Butler to protect the fort and eventually threaten Richmond, thus perhaps bringing a quick end to the war. Opposing the Yankees was the aggressive and dramatic Colonel John Bankhead Magruder, who decided to lure Butler into a fight. Magruder fortified a strategic swampy creek crossing, skillfully placed several artillery pieces, selected excellent defensive positions for his 1,400 men, and camouflaged the entire works with brush. Never one to shy away from a challenge, Butler marshaled about 4,000 men for a daring dawn attack. Although Butler's forces launched three charges against earthworks well supported by artillery, each was repulsed. Several reasons account for this, including a demoralizing friendly-fire incident, a combination of murderous cannon and musketry, Magruder's deft handling of his men, the inexperience of the attackers, and poor Union leadership. One of the sterling performances of the day was turned in by Colonel Daniel H. Hill, who ordered his Southern infantry to move across the enemy's front to retake a forward redoubt. While the carnage was light compared to later battles, the combat at Big Bethel remained indelibly imprinted on those who fought there. The successful defense reinforced the belief most Southerners held that their martial invincibility and defense of home and hearth were divinely inspired. After initial disbelief and shame, the defeat hardened Northern resolution to preserve their sacred Union. The notion began to take hold that, contrary to popular belief, the war would be difficult and protracted--a conviction that was cemented in reality the following month on the plains of Manassas. Years in the making, Battle of Big Bethel relies upon letters, diaries, newspapers, reminiscences, official records, and period images--some used for the first time. The authors detail the events leading up to the encounter, survey the personalities as well as the contributions of the participants, set forth a nuanced description of the confusion-ridden field of battle, and elaborate upon its consequences. Here, finally, the story of Big Bethel is colorfully and compellingly brought to life through the words and deeds of a fascinating array of soldiers, civilians, "contraband" slaves, and politicians whose lives intersected on that fateful day in the early summer of 1861.

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4.1/5

TIME Gettysburg by Time-Life Books

History was made on the first three days of July 1863 at Gettysburg, Pa., where Confederate General Robert E. Lee waged a final desperate gamble to win the Civil War-and lost. Now TIME celebrates the 150th anniversary of this pivotal battle in a freshly reported, incisively written and beautifully illustrated volume. TIME has enlisted a brilliant roster of writers to offer History was made on the first three days of July 1863 at Gettysburg, Pa., where Confederate General Robert E. Lee waged a final desperate gamble to win the Civil War-and lost. Now TIME celebrates the 150th anniversary of this pivotal battle in a freshly reported, incisively written and beautifully illustrated volume. TIME has enlisted a brilliant roster of writers to offer fresh perspectives on this iconic battle. Best-selling novelist Jeff Shaara will create a fictional portrait of a Southern soldier in the ranks, and military historian David Eisenhower will examine the strategy of the battle. Noted TIME weekly writers include Richard Lacayo on photography in the war, Jeff Kluger on medicine on the battlefield, David Von Drehle on Lincoln and his generals, and critic Richard Corliss on the war on film, while veteran TIME cartographer Jackson Dykman is creating all new maps for the book. This oversized hardcover edition will offer a magnificent canvas for classic war photographs and other images from the period.

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3.4/5

Lincoln's Lieutenants: The High Command of the Army of the Potomac by Stephen W. Sears

From the best-selling author of Gettysburg, a multilayered group biography of the commanders who led the Army of the Potomac The high command of the Army of the Potomac was a changeable, often dysfunctional band of brothers, going through the fires of war under seven commanding generals in three years, until Grant came east in 1864. The men in charge all too frequently appe From the best-selling author of Gettysburg, a multilayered group biography of the commanders who led the Army of the Potomac The high command of the Army of the Potomac was a changeable, often dysfunctional band of brothers, going through the fires of war under seven commanding generals in three years, until Grant came east in 1864. The men in charge all too frequently appeared to be fighting against the administration in Washington instead of for it, increasingly cast as political pawns facing down a vindictive congressional Committee on the Conduct of the War. President Lincoln oversaw, argued with, and finally tamed his unruly team of generals as the eastern army was stabilized by an unsung supporting cast of corps, division, and brigade generals. With characteristic style and insight, Stephen Sears brings these courageous, determined officers, who rose through the ranks and led from the front, to life.

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