Popular Siege Of Petersburg Books

13+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Siege Of Petersburg

Discover the list of some best books written on Siege Of Petersburg by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Siege Of Petersburg highly popular among the readers worldwide.

5/5

The Battle of New Market Heights: Freedom Will Be Theirs by the Sword by James S. Price

In the predawn darkness of September 29, 1864, black Union soldiers attacked a heavily fortified position on the outskirts of the Confederate capital of Richmond. In a few hours of desperate fighting, these African American soldiers struck a blow against Robert E. Lee's vaunted Army of Northern Virginia and proved to detractors that they could fight for freedom and citizen In the predawn darkness of September 29, 1864, black Union soldiers attacked a heavily fortified position on the outskirts of the Confederate capital of Richmond. In a few hours of desperate fighting, these African American soldiers struck a blow against Robert E. Lee's vaunted Army of Northern Virginia and proved to detractors that they could fight for freedom and citizenship for themselves and their enslaved brethren. For fourteen of the black soldiers who stormed New Market Heights that day, their bravery would be awarded with the nation's highest honor--the Congressional Medal of Honor. With vivid firsthand accounts and meticulous tactical detail, James S. Price brings the Battle of New Market Heights into brilliant focus, with maps by master cartographer Steven Stanley.Other books in the Civil War Sesquicentennial Series include:The Battle of Antietam ♦ The Battle of Franklin ♦ The Chancellorsville Campaign ♦ The Battle of South Mountain ♦ Stonewall Jackson's 1862 Valley Campaign ♦ Charleston Under Siege ♦ Andersonville Civil War Prison ♦ The Civil War at Perryville ♦ The Battle of Okolona ♦ Fort Davidson and the Battle of Pilot Knobb ♦ The Two Civil War Battles of Newtonia ♦ The Battle of Port Royal ♦ The Confederacy's Secret Weapon ♦ Lee in the Lowcountry ♦ Defending South Carolina's Coast ♦ Facing Sherman in South Carolina ♦ The Battle of Brandy Station ♦ The Battle of Cedar Creek ♦ The Battle of Fredericksburg ♦ The Battle of Piedmont ♦ Big Bethel ♦ The Battle of Mine Creek ♦ West Virginia in the Civil War ♦ Civil War Atlanta ♦ The Battle of Westport ♦ The Union is Dissolved ♦ The Battle of Fort Donelson

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4.9/5

Richmond Redeemed: The Siege at Petersburg by Richard J. Sommers

Richard J. Sommers' Richmond Redeemed: The Siege at Petersburg pioneered the study of the Civil War fighting around Petersburg. This award-winning volume conveyed an epic narrative of crucial military operations in early autumn 1864 which had gone unrecognized for more than 100 years.

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5/5

Death in the Trenches: Grant at Petersburg by William C. Davis

Covers the Siege of Petersburg from its start in June 1864 to the re-election of Abraham Lincoln in November 1864. Various photographs, engravings, and paintings illustrate life during the campaign and the experiences of the soldiers.

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4.6/5

In the Trenches at Petersburg: Field Fortifications and Confederate Defeat by Earl J. Hess

In the Trenches at Petersburg, the final volume of Earl J. Hess's trilogy of works on the fortifications of the Civil War, recounts the strategic and tactical operations around Petersburg during the last ten months of the Civil War. Hess covers all aspects of the Petersburg campaign, from important engagements that punctuated the long months of siege to mining and counterm In the Trenches at Petersburg, the final volume of Earl J. Hess's trilogy of works on the fortifications of the Civil War, recounts the strategic and tactical operations around Petersburg during the last ten months of the Civil War. Hess covers all aspects of the Petersburg campaign, from important engagements that punctuated the long months of siege to mining and countermining operations, the fashioning of wire entanglements and the laying of torpedo fields to impede attacks, and the construction of underground shelters to protect the men manning the works. In the Trenches at Petersburg humanizes the experience of the soldiers working in the fortifications and reveals the human cost of trench warfare in the waning days of the struggle.

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4.2/5

Petersburg National Military Park, Virginia by Richard Wayne Lykes

Excerpt from Petersburg National Military Park, Virginia The first of the Northern forces to arrive on the scene of battle was the XVIII Corps of the Army of the James. Early in the morning of June 15 these troops, commanded by Gen. William F. Smith, crossed from Bermuda Hundred to the south side of the Appomattox by means of a pontoon bridge at Broadway Landing. Eighteen t Excerpt from Petersburg National Military Park, Virginia The first of the Northern forces to arrive on the scene of battle was the XVIII Corps of the Army of the James. Early in the morning of June 15 these troops, commanded by Gen. William F. Smith, crossed from Bermuda Hundred to the south side of the Appomattox by means of a pontoon bridge at Broadway Landing. Eighteen thousand Union soldiers were on their way to face less than under Beauregard. Throughout the day they approached the city and assembled for the attack. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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4.3/5

The 48th Pennsylvania in the Battle of the Crater: A Regiment of Coal Miners Who Tunneled Under the Enemy by Jim Corrigan

In May 1864, with Lee's army occupied in an attempt to delay Grant'sadvance toward the Confederate capital, the Army of the Jamescommanded by Benjamin Butler disembarked 15,000 Union troops atBermuda Hundred, five miles from Petersburg and several vitalConfederate supply lines. Although the Union was slow to realize thevalue of the position the troops held, the Confederacy In May 1864, with Lee's army occupied in an attempt to delay Grant'sadvance toward the Confederate capital, the Army of the Jamescommanded by Benjamin Butler disembarked 15,000 Union troops atBermuda Hundred, five miles from Petersburg and several vitalConfederate supply lines. Although the Union was slow to realize thevalue of the position the troops held, the Confederacy was not.

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3.2/5

Richmond Must Fall: The Richmond-Petersburg Campaign, October 1864 by Hampton Newsome

In the fall of 1864, the Civil War's outcome rested largely on Abraham Lincoln's success in the upcoming presidential election. As the contest approached, cautious optimism buoyed the President's supporters in the wake of Union victories at Atlanta and in the Shenandoah Valley. With all eyes on the upcoming election, Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant conducted a series of In the fall of 1864, the Civil War's outcome rested largely on Abraham Lincoln's success in the upcoming presidential election. As the contest approached, cautious optimism buoyed the President's supporters in the wake of Union victories at Atlanta and in the Shenandoah Valley. With all eyes on the upcoming election, Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant conducted a series of large-scale military operations outside Richmond and Petersburg, which have, until now, received little attention. In Richmond Must Fall, Hampton Newsome examines these October battles in unprecedented scope and detail. The narrative begins with one of Lee's last offensive operations of the war at the Darbytown Road on October 7, 1864, and ends with Grant's major offensive on October 27 to seize the South Side Railroad, the last open rail line into the Confederate stronghold at Petersburg. The offensive would spark sharp fighting at Burgess Mill south of Petersburg and on the Williamsburg Road east of Richmond. The October 1864 operations offer important insights into the personalities and command styles of Lee and Grant, including Lee's penchant for audacity and overwhelming thirst to strike a blow against his opponent even against bitter odds and Grant's willingness to shoulder heavy responsibility in the face of great risk. The narrative explores the relationships within the high command of both armies, including Grant's sometimes strained partnership with the cautious George Meade. It also illustrates Grant's efforts to guide the strong-willed political general Benjamin F. Butler, whose steadfast support for African American troops would spark a prisoner controversy that would bring the war's underlying issues of slavery and race into bold relief. For the Confederates, the month's operations illustrate Lee's necessary reliance on his key combat commanders at Petersburg, including the formidable William Mahone.

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4/5

Confederate Alamo: Bloodbath at Petersburg's Fort Gregg on April 2, 1865 by John J. Fox III

Robert E. Lee faced the most monumental crisis of his military career on the morning of April 2, 1865. By sunrise that morning, the Union 6th Corps had punched a huge hole in Lee’s outer line, southwest of Petersburg. He needed time for reinforcements to arrive from Richmond, but how could his depleted army buy that time? Amidst overwhelming odds, this suicide mission fell Robert E. Lee faced the most monumental crisis of his military career on the morning of April 2, 1865. By sunrise that morning, the Union 6th Corps had punched a huge hole in Lee’s outer line, southwest of Petersburg. He needed time for reinforcements to arrive from Richmond, but how could his depleted army buy that time? Amidst overwhelming odds, this suicide mission fell to a handful of Confederates who made a desperate last stand at Fort Gregg. Douglas Southall Freeman called this epic fight “one of the most dramatic incidents of an overwhelming day,” and yet it has been overshadowed by all the other historic events of April 1865. Fourteen Union soldiers received the Medal of Honor for their bravery at Fort Gregg. Many battle-scarred veterans from both sides described this clash as the nastiest of their four-year war experience.

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4.7/5

A Melancholy Affair at the Weldon Railroad: The Vermont Brigade, June 23, 1864 by David Faris Cross

The Vermonters' Andersonville experience is studied to understand the cause of the lethal statistics. The story of the suffering endured by the four hundred Vermonters captured at the Weldon Railroad is a tale of remarkable courage and devotion to country.

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4.7/5

The Siege of Petersburg (National Park Civil War Series) by Noah Andre Trudeau

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4.4/5

The Petersburg Campaign: June 1864-April 1865 by John Horn

This title covers the series of battles leading up to the inevitable siege of Petersburg, including Drewry''s Bluff, Globe Tavern and Fort Harrison, and the siege itself, with its incessant trench warfare and and fighting along the James River.'

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3.2/5

No Quarter: The Battle of the Crater, 1864 by Richard Slotkin

In this richly researched and dramatic work of military history, eminent historian Richard Slotkin recounts one of the Civil War’s most pivotal events: the Battle of the Crater on July 30, 1864. At first glance, the Union’s plan seemed brilliant: A regiment of miners would burrow beneath a Confederate fort, pack the tunnel with explosives, and blow a hole in the enemy line In this richly researched and dramatic work of military history, eminent historian Richard Slotkin recounts one of the Civil War’s most pivotal events: the Battle of the Crater on July 30, 1864. At first glance, the Union’s plan seemed brilliant: A regiment of miners would burrow beneath a Confederate fort, pack the tunnel with explosives, and blow a hole in the enemy lines. Then a specially trained division of African American infantry would spearhead a powerful assault to exploit the breach created by the explosion. Thus, in one decisive action, the Union would marshal its mastery of technology and resources, as well as demonstrate the superior morale generated by the Army of the Potomac’s embrace of emancipation. At stake was the chance to drive General Robert E. Lee’s Army of North Virginia away from the defense of the Confederate capital of Richmond–and end the war. The result was something far different. The attack was hamstrung by incompetent leadership and political infighting in the Union command. The massive explosion ripped open an immense crater, which became a death trap for troops that tried to pass through it. Thousands of soldiers on both sides lost their lives in savage trench warfare that prefigured the brutal combat of World War I. But the fighting here was intensified by racial hatred, with cries on both sides of “No quarter!” In a final horror, the battle ended with the massacre of wounded or surrendering Black troops by the Rebels–and by some of their White comrades in arms. The great attack ended in bloody failure, and the war would be prolonged for another year. With gripping and unforgettable depictions of battle and detailed character portraits of soldiers and statesmen, No Quarter compellingly re-creates in human scale an event epic in scope and mind-boggling in its cost of life. In using the Battle of the Crater as a lens through which to focus the political and social ramifications of the Civil War–particularly the racial tensions on both sides of the struggle–Richard Slotkin brings to readers a fresh perspective on perhaps the most consequential period in American history.

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3.3/5

The Last Citadel: Petersburg, Virginia, June 1864-April 1865 by Noah Andre Trudeau

Perhaps no other battle or campaign of the American Civil War equalled the siege of Petersburg, Virginia. For 292 days, the war's final drama was played out over the fate of this once gracious Southern town, the last bulwark of the Confederacy. The book covers the 11-month siege of Petersburg.

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