Popular Harare Books

2+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Harare

Discover the list of some best books written on Harare by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Harare highly popular among the readers worldwide.

3.9/5

The Cry of the Go-Away Bird by Andrea Eames

Elise loves the farm that is her home; she loves playing with beetles and chameleons in the garden, buying sweets from the village shop and listening to the stories of spirits and charms told by her nanny, Beauty. As a young white girl in 1990s Zimbabwe, her life is idyllic. Her clothes are always clean and ironed, there is always tea in the silver teapot, gin and tonics a Elise loves the farm that is her home; she loves playing with beetles and chameleons in the garden, buying sweets from the village shop and listening to the stories of spirits and charms told by her nanny, Beauty. As a young white girl in 1990s Zimbabwe, her life is idyllic. Her clothes are always clean and ironed, there is always tea in the silver teapot, gin and tonics are served on the veranda, and, in theory at least, black and white live in harmony. However this dream-world of her childhood cannot last. As Elise gets older, her eyes are opened to the complexities of adult existence, both through the changes wrought in her family by the arrival of her step-father Steve, and through her growing understanding of the tensions in Zimbabwean society. As Mugabe's presidency turns sour, the privileged world of the white farmers begins to crumble into anarchy. The Cry of the Go-Away Bird follows Elise as she attempts to make sense of her place in the world while her family struggle to stay afloat in the collapsing economy and escalating horror that surrounds them. As the violence intensifies and the farm invasions begin, Elise and her family are forced to confront difficult choices and the ancient unforgiving ghosts of the past.

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3.3/5

The Struggle Continues by David Coltart

“A must read for anyone who is intrigued by Zimbabwean politics and history, but also those interested in the power of our common humanity and the strength that is inside us all.” – Kerry Kennedy, President, Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights “… a masterful account that is eye-opening and shocking, yet never loses hope” – Christina Lamb, author of The Africa House and co-author “A must read for anyone who is intrigued by Zimbabwean politics and history, but also those interested in the power of our common humanity and the strength that is inside us all.” – Kerry Kennedy, President, Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights “… a masterful account that is eye-opening and shocking, yet never loses hope” – Christina Lamb, author of The Africa House and co-author of I Am Malala “… This magnificent book is far more than just the autobiography of one of the most significant figures in Zimbabwean history; it is also a history of Zimbabwe itself, and a moral testament.” – Peter Oborne, Political Columnist of the Daily Mail, and author of The Rise of Political Lying, The Triumph of the Political Class and Basil D’Oliveira: Cricket and Conspiracy – The Untold Story David Coltart’s roots in Africa might be deep generational ones but his love for and commitment to the country he grew up in, Zimbabwe, goes far beyond the accident of birth. This is an authoritative work, spanning the last 60 years of Zimbabwe’s history, told from the unique perspective of a first-hand witness. Reflecting his career initially as a human rights lawyer in Bulawayo and later, from 2000, as a member of Parliament for the MDC opposition party, Coltart’s personal narrative is compelling and his scope broad. With sharp insight and intelligent analysis, he is as unsparing of himself as he is of those who continue to wash their hands in the blood of a traumatised people. Coltart throws new light on the shaping and undoing of a country, from the obstinate racism of Ian Smith that provoked Rhodesia’s UDI from Britain in 1965, the civil war of the 1970s which brought independence and hopeful democracy to a scarred nation, the Gukurahundi genocide of the 1980s and the terror of the Fifth Brigade, to Mugabe’s war on white farmers and the urban poor, and seemingly unshakeable grip on power. Fearless in his championing of peace, non-violence and justice and in speaking truth to power, Coltart was branded by Mugabe as a traitor to the state and survived several attempts on his life. Through it all he kept meticulous notes, records, letters and diaries, much of which is source material for this book.

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