Popular Cameroon Books

15+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Cameroon

Discover the list of some best books written on Cameroon by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Cameroon highly popular among the readers worldwide.

5/5

Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue

Jende Jonga, a Cameroonian immigrant living in Harlem, has come to the United States to provide a better life for himself, his wife, Neni, and their six-year-old son. In the fall of 2007, Jende can hardly believe his luck when he lands a job as a chauffeur for Clark Edwards, a senior executive at Lehman Brothers. Clark demands punctuality, discretion, and loyalty—and Jende Jende Jonga, a Cameroonian immigrant living in Harlem, has come to the United States to provide a better life for himself, his wife, Neni, and their six-year-old son. In the fall of 2007, Jende can hardly believe his luck when he lands a job as a chauffeur for Clark Edwards, a senior executive at Lehman Brothers. Clark demands punctuality, discretion, and loyalty—and Jende is eager to please. Clark’s wife, Cindy, even offers Neni temporary work at the Edwardses’ summer home in the Hamptons. With these opportunities, Jende and Neni can at last gain a foothold in America and imagine a brighter future. However, the world of great power and privilege conceals troubling secrets, and soon Jende and Neni notice cracks in their employers’ façades. When the financial world is rocked by the collapse of Lehman Brothers, the Jongas are desperate to keep Jende’s job—even as their marriage threatens to fall apart. As all four lives are dramatically upended, Jende and Neni are forced to make an impossible choice.

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3.5/5

Houseboy by Ferdinand Oyono , John Reed (Translator)

Toundi Ondoua, the rural African protagonist of Houseboy, encounters a world of prisms that cast beautiful but unobtainable glimmers, especially for a black youth in colonial Cameroon. Houseboy, written in the form of Toundi's captivating diary and translated from the original French, discloses his awe of the white world and a web of unpredictable experiences. Early on, he Toundi Ondoua, the rural African protagonist of Houseboy, encounters a world of prisms that cast beautiful but unobtainable glimmers, especially for a black youth in colonial Cameroon. Houseboy, written in the form of Toundi's captivating diary and translated from the original French, discloses his awe of the white world and a web of unpredictable experiences. Early on, he escapes his father's angry blows by seeking asylum with his benefactor, the local European priest who meets an untimely death. Toundi then becomes "the Chief European's 'boy'--the dog of the King." Toundi's attempt to fulfill a dream of advancement and improvement opens his eyes to troubling realities. Gradually, preconceptions of the Europeans come crashing down on him as he struggles with his identity, his place in society, and the changing culture.

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4.1/5

The Poor Christ of Bomba by Mongo Beti , Gerald Moore (Translator)

In Bomba the girls who are being prepared for Christian marriage live together in the women's camp. Gradually it becomes apparent that the local church men have been using the local girls for their own purposes. This novel is a biting critique of colonial life and missionary activity.

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4.9/5

La Saison de l'ombre by LĂ©onora Miano

Afrique sub-saharienne. Les fils aĂźnĂ©s du clan Mulongo ont disparu. Au cours d'une quĂȘte aussi bien initiatique que rĂ©elle et dangereuse, les Ă©missaires du clan vont comprendre que leurs voisins, les Bwele, sont responsables de cette disparition. Dans ce roman puissant, LĂ©onora Miano revient sur la traite nĂ©griĂšre pour faire entendre la voix de celles et ceux Ă  qui elle a Afrique sub-saharienne. Les fils aĂźnĂ©s du clan Mulongo ont disparu. Au cours d'une quĂȘte aussi bien initiatique que rĂ©elle et dangereuse, les Ă©missaires du clan vont comprendre que leurs voisins, les Bwele, sont responsables de cette disparition. Dans ce roman puissant, LĂ©onora Miano revient sur la traite nĂ©griĂšre pour faire entendre la voix de celles et ceux Ă  qui elle a volĂ© un ĂȘtre cher. L'histoire de l'Afrique sub-saharienne s'y drape dans une prose magnifique et mystĂ©rieuse, imprĂ©gnĂ©e du mysticisme, de croyances, et de « l'obligation d'inventer pour survivre. »

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4.1/5

Mission to Kala by Mongo Beti

Medza is sent off to retrieve a villager's wife who has run off with a man from another tribe. Amongst his best appreciated and funniest novels.

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3.5/5

Mango Elephants in the Sun: How Life in an African Village Let Me Be in My Skin by Susana Herrera

When the Peace Corps sends Susana Herrera to teach English in Northern Cameroon, she yearns to embrace her adopted village and its people, to drink deep from the spirit of Mother Africa—and to forget a bitter childhood and painful past. To the villagers, however, she's a rich American tourist, a nasara (white person) who has never known pain or want. They stare at her in s When the Peace Corps sends Susana Herrera to teach English in Northern Cameroon, she yearns to embrace her adopted village and its people, to drink deep from the spirit of Mother Africa—and to forget a bitter childhood and painful past. To the villagers, however, she's a rich American tourist, a nasara (white person) who has never known pain or want. They stare at her in silence. The children giggle and run away. At first her only confidant is a miraculously communicative lizard. Susana fights back with every ounce of heart and humor she possesses, and slowly begins to make a difference. She ventures out to the village well and learns to carry water on her head. In a classroom crowded to suffocation she finds a way to discipline her students without resorting to the beatings they are used to. She makes ice cream in the scorching heat, and learns how to plant millet and kill chickens. She laughs with the villagers, cries with them, works and prays with them, heals and is helped by them. Village life is hard but magical. Poverty is rampant—yet people sing and share what little they have. The termites that chew up her bed like morning cereal are fried and eaten in their turn ("bite-sized and crunchy like Doritos"). Nobody knows what tomorrow may bring, but even the morning greetings impart a purer sense of being in the moment. Gradually, Susana and the village become part of each other. They will never be the same again.

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4.7/5

The Informationist by Taylor Stevens

"Vanessa Michael Munroe deals in information--expensive information--working for corporations, heads of state, private clients, and anyone else who can pay for her unique brand of expertise. Born to missionary parents in lawless central Africa, Munroe took up with an infamous gunrunner and his mercenary crew when she was just fourteen. As his protégé, she earned the respec "Vanessa Michael Munroe deals in information--expensive information--working for corporations, heads of state, private clients, and anyone else who can pay for her unique brand of expertise. Born to missionary parents in lawless central Africa, Munroe took up with an infamous gunrunner and his mercenary crew when she was just fourteen. As his protégé, she earned the respect of the jungle's most dangerous men, cultivating her own reputation for years until something sent her running. After almost a decade building a new life and lucrative career from her home base in Dallas, she's never looked back. Until now."

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4.3/5

Cameroon with Egbert by Dervla Murphy

Cameroon with Egbert tells the story of a journey through the remote areas of Cameroon undertaken by indomitable author Dervla Murphy and her daughter Rachel, accompanied by an endearing horse named Egbert. During the course of their wanderings they are frequently mistaken for husband and wife, forcing Dervla to bare her chest to prove her femininity; they continually get Cameroon with Egbert tells the story of a journey through the remote areas of Cameroon undertaken by indomitable author Dervla Murphy and her daughter Rachel, accompanied by an endearing horse named Egbert. During the course of their wanderings they are frequently mistaken for husband and wife, forcing Dervla to bare her chest to prove her femininity; they continually get lost, are obliged to eat repulsive local delicacies; are arrested, fall ill, are baked by the sun and soaked by tropical storms and, disastrously, lose Egbert. The two women's charm, wit and sense of adventure shine through all these setbacks, which would have daunted lesser travellers. They eventually leave this laid-back, peaceful country with great reluctance, having been 'enspelled' by its beauty and the friendliness of the Cameroonians. 'Anyone who has read a book by this author will want to read another. She brings to Cameroon all the sympathy, wit and perception that we have come to expect from her.' Sunday Telegraph This is vintage Murphy' Irish Independent 'This is the very stuff of travel' Irish Times

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3.3/5

The Sacred Door and Other Stories: Cameroon Folktales of the Beba by Makuchi , Isidore Okpewho (Foreword)

The Sacred Door and Other Stories: Cameroon Folktales of the Beba offers readers a selection of folktales infused with riddles, proverbs, songs, myths, and legends, using various narrative techniques that capture the vibrancy of Beba oral traditions. Makuchi retells the stories that she heard at home when she was growing up in her native Cameroon. The collection of thirty-f The Sacred Door and Other Stories: Cameroon Folktales of the Beba offers readers a selection of folktales infused with riddles, proverbs, songs, myths, and legends, using various narrative techniques that capture the vibrancy of Beba oral traditions. Makuchi retells the stories that she heard at home when she was growing up in her native Cameroon. The collection of thirty-four folktales of the Beba showcases a wide variety of stories that capture the richness and complexities of an agrarian society’s oral literature and traditions. Revenge, greed, and deception are among the themes that frame the story lines in both new and familiar ways. In the title story, a poor man finds himself elevated to king. The condition for his continued success is that he not open the sacred door. This tale of temptation, similar to the story of Pandora’s box, concludes with the question, “What would you have done?” Makuchi relates the stories her mother told her so that readers can make connections between African and North American oral narrative traditions. These tales reinforce the commonalities of our human experiences without discounting our differences.

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4.1/5

The Innocent Anthropologist: Notes from a Mud Hut by Nigel Barley

Note: This book was originally published as Not a Hazardous Sport. When British anthropologist Nigel Barley set up home among the Dowayo people in northern Cameroon, he knew how fieldwork should be conducted. Unfortunately, nobody had told the Dowayo. His compulsive, witty account of first fieldwork offers a wonderfully inspiring introduction to the real life of a cultural Note: This book was originally published as Not a Hazardous Sport. When British anthropologist Nigel Barley set up home among the Dowayo people in northern Cameroon, he knew how fieldwork should be conducted. Unfortunately, nobody had told the Dowayo. His compulsive, witty account of first fieldwork offers a wonderfully inspiring introduction to the real life of a cultural anthropologist doing research in a Third World area. Both touching and hilarious, Barley's unconventional story—in which he survived boredom, hostility, disaster, and illness—addresses many critical issues in anthropology and in fieldwork.

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3.5/5

Your Madness, Not Mine: Stories of Cameroon by Makuchi

Women's writing in Cameroon has so far been dominated by Francophone writers. The short stories in this collection represent the yearnings and vision of an Anglophone woman, who writes both as a Cameroonian and as a woman whose life has been shaped by the minority status her people occupy within the nation-state. The stories in Your Madness, Not Mine are about postcolonial Women's writing in Cameroon has so far been dominated by Francophone writers. The short stories in this collection represent the yearnings and vision of an Anglophone woman, who writes both as a Cameroonian and as a woman whose life has been shaped by the minority status her people occupy within the nation-state. The stories in Your Madness, Not Mine are about postcolonial Cameroon, but especially about Cameroonian women, who probe their day-to-day experiences of survival and empowerment as they deal with gender oppression: from patriarchal expectations to the malaise of maldevelopment, unemployment, and the attraction of the West for young Cameroonians. Makuchi has given us powerful portraits of the people of postcolonial Africa in the so-called global village who too often go unseen and unheard.

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4.8/5

The Bafut Beagles by Gerald Durrell

Young English zoologist Gerard Durrell returns to the Cameroons in West Central Africa in 1949 for another humorous and fascinating animal collecting expedition. Meet a frog with a coat of hair (which turns out not to be hair at all), full grown monkeys that fit inside a teacup, mice with wings, and many more of the species endemic to the Cameroons, not to mention the loca Young English zoologist Gerard Durrell returns to the Cameroons in West Central Africa in 1949 for another humorous and fascinating animal collecting expedition. Meet a frog with a coat of hair (which turns out not to be hair at all), full grown monkeys that fit inside a teacup, mice with wings, and many more of the species endemic to the Cameroons, not to mention the local ruler, the Fon of Bafut.

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3.4/5

L'intérieur de la nuit by Léonora Miano

De nos jours. Dans un pays imaginaire d'Afrique noire... AprÚs plusieurs années d'études en Europe, la « fille de l'étrangÚre », Ayané, retourne à Eku, son village natal, au chevet de sa mÚre. La colÚre gronde dans cette région entourée de collines au milieu de la brousse, qui évolue hors du temps, selon des traditions ancestrales : de prétendus patriotes du Nord, furieux e De nos jours. Dans un pays imaginaire d'Afrique noire... AprÚs plusieurs années d'études en Europe, la « fille de l'étrangÚre », Ayané, retourne à Eku, son village natal, au chevet de sa mÚre. La colÚre gronde dans cette région entourée de collines au milieu de la brousse, qui évolue hors du temps, selon des traditions ancestrales : de prétendus patriotes du Nord, furieux et sanguinaires, réussissent à pénétrer au coeur d'Eku et le mettent en quarantaine. Sous couvert d'une idéologie prÎnant le retour à une Afrique flamboyante et mythologique, les miliciens préparent une longue et horrifiante cérémonie : pour Ayané, la nuit sera longue...

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3.8/5

Travels in West Africa by Mary Henrietta Kingsley , Anthony Brandt (Introduction)

In 1893, defying every convention of Victorian womanhood, Mary Kingsley set off alone for West Africa to collect botanical specimens. Unaccompanied except for native guides, she plunged boldly into forbidding jungles, often the first European--and almost always the first white woman--ever to arrive. Undaunted by tales of ferocious cannibals, she made friends with the tribe In 1893, defying every convention of Victorian womanhood, Mary Kingsley set off alone for West Africa to collect botanical specimens. Unaccompanied except for native guides, she plunged boldly into forbidding jungles, often the first European--and almost always the first white woman--ever to arrive. Undaunted by tales of ferocious cannibals, she made friends with the tribes she met and collected priceless samples of flora and fauna. Along the way she fought off crocodiles with a paddle and hit a leopard over the head with a pot. When she fell into a trap lined with sharp sticks, she was saved by her voluminous crinolines--for she always dressed like a lady. Travels in West Africa is a book as vivid and unforgettable as the extraordinary woman herself. "The charm of West Africa is a painful one: it gives you pleasure when you are out there, but when you are back here it gives you pain by calling you . . . Come back, come back, this is your home."--Mary Kingsley National Geographic Adventure Classics is a series that celebrates the "100 greatest adventure books of all time," as compiled by a panel of experts for National Geographic Adventure. These titles have been carefully selected for their adrenaline quotient and their status as classics of the adventure genre.

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4.9/5

The Old Man and the Medal by Ferdinand Oyono , John Reed (Translator)

Takes a satirical look at colonialism and the situations it promotes. By the author of Houseboy.

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