Popular Antietam Campaign Books

15+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Antietam Campaign

Discover the list of some best books written on Antietam Campaign by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Antietam Campaign highly popular among the readers worldwide.

3.2/5

Before Antietam: The Battle for South Mountain by John Michael Priest

Robert E. Lee, after decisively repelling John Pope's August 1862 invasion of Virginia at the Second Battle of Manassas, took the offensive. Moving north into Maryland, Lee divided his forces to capture Harpers Ferry while continuing his advance further into Union territory. George B. McClellan, the new Union commander, learned that Lee had divided his forces, and advanced Robert E. Lee, after decisively repelling John Pope's August 1862 invasion of Virginia at the Second Battle of Manassas, took the offensive. Moving north into Maryland, Lee divided his forces to capture Harpers Ferry while continuing his advance further into Union territory. George B. McClellan, the new Union commander, learned that Lee had divided his forces, and advanced to attack the Confederates. The armies, from squad to corps level, fought hard in both cavalry and infantry actions for control of the three gaps across South Mountain, about sixty miles from the Federal capital. The victory McClellan's officers and men gave him forced Lee to fall back and regroup near the town of Sharpsburg, Maryland, thus setting the stage for the Civil War's bloodiest day which soon followed at Antietam Creek. Three days before that September day, the opposing armies fought a series of engagements that came to be known as the Battle of South Mountain. Until Before Antietam, those battles existed in our history as only a footnote to the events at Antietam. Because of the work of John Michael Priest those terrible encounters now have their rightful place in American military history.

I WANT TO READ THIS
4.8/5

The Antietam Campaign by John Cannan

September 17, 1862, over 25,000 men became casualties in the battle of Antietam, on the Civil War’s single bloodiest day. Confederate and Federal infantry and artillery faced each other at close quarters in the woods around the town of Sharpsburg, Maryland, and particularly along the banks of Antietam Creek. The famous actions at the Cornfield, the Dunker Church, Burnside’ September 17, 1862, over 25,000 men became casualties in the battle of Antietam, on the Civil War’s single bloodiest day. Confederate and Federal infantry and artillery faced each other at close quarters in the woods around the town of Sharpsburg, Maryland, and particularly along the banks of Antietam Creek. The famous actions at the Cornfield, the Dunker Church, Burnside’s Bridge, and the Bloody Lane are covered in vivid detail, drawing on the personal accounts of the commanders as well as lesser-known writings of ordinary soldiers. The famous units on both sides, the most colorful commanders, the civil War’s youngest casualty, and Clara Barton’s baptism of fir are all accorded their proper place. The Antietam Campaign goes far beyond this, however. John Cannan’s classic work has undergone extensive revision under the editorial direction of renowned Civil War historian David G. Martin to reflect new information and new interpretations of recent years. The battle of Antietam is placed clearly within the context of the strategic and political situation in the second year of the Civil War, and is seen as part of a larger military campaign that included actions at Harpers Ferry and South Mountain. The strengths and weaknesses of Union commander George B. McClellan are examined with unusual fairness, and viewed in the light of Abraham Lincoln’s search for a commanding general. Robert E. Lee’s often-misunderstood aims in the campaign are clarified with reference to the best available research, and his supply and manpower problems are described in a forthright manner that overcomes a century of romanticism and wishful thinking. Specially prepared maps, a detailed order of battle, and specialized sidebars supplement the main narrative. Individual deeds of heroism are placed against a backdrop of the valuable lessons of this campaign, with its intelligence failures on both sides, its political considerations, its evolving operational doctrine, and the unique attempt by both armies to win the allegiance of the local population.

I WANT TO READ THIS
3.8/5

The Bloodiest Day: The Battle of Antietam by Ronald H. Bailey

Beautifully bound and illustrated volume on the Civil War featuring The Bloodiest Day, the Battle of Antietam. Part of Time-Life's popular series on the Civil War, this book covers the 1862 Maryland Campaign and includes maps, period engravings and sketches, and several dozen photographs.

I WANT TO READ THIS
5/5

Antietam: Essays on the 1862 Maryland Campaign by Gary W. Gallagher (Editor)

The relative importance of Civil War campaigns is a matter for debate among historians and buffs alike. Gettysburg, Vicksburg, and Atlanta have their advocates. Gettysburg certainly maintains its hold on the popular imagination. More recently has come the suggestion that no single campaign or battle decided the war or even appreciably altered its direction. If any one battl The relative importance of Civil War campaigns is a matter for debate among historians and buffs alike. Gettysburg, Vicksburg, and Atlanta have their advocates. Gettysburg certainly maintains its hold on the popular imagination. More recently has come the suggestion that no single campaign or battle decided the war or even appreciably altered its direction. If any one battle was a dividing line, Antietam is a solid contender. In no other campaign were the political, diplomatic, and military elements aligned so favorably for the Confederacy. Yet Lee's retreat after the terrible battle in September 1862 changed everything. Great Britain had second thoughts about intervention; Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation; and Lee's army, while victorious on other fields, proved not to be unbeatable. Across the years, Antietam remains the worst one-day slaughter in American history. The ghastly losses in the Cornfield, the West Woods, and the Sunken Road still appall the reader. Lee's gamble against disaster and George McClellan's inexplicable refusal to press his advantage remain puzzlements.

I WANT TO READ THIS
3.8/5

The Maps of Antietam: An Atlas of The Antietam (Sharpsburg) Campaign, Including the Battle of South Mountain, September 2 - 20, 1862 by Bradley M. Gottfried

The Maps of Antietam: An Atlas of the Antietam (Sharpsburg) Campaign is the eagerly awaited companion volume to Bradley M. Gottfried s bestselling The Maps of Gettysburg (2007) and The Maps of First Bull Run (2009), part of the ongoing Savas Beatie Military Atlas Series.Now available as an ebook short, The Maps of Antietam: The Movement to and the Battle of Antietam, Septe The Maps of Antietam: An Atlas of the Antietam (Sharpsburg) Campaign is the eagerly awaited companion volume to Bradley M. Gottfried s bestselling The Maps of Gettysburg (2007) and The Maps of First Bull Run (2009), part of the ongoing Savas Beatie Military Atlas Series.Now available as an ebook short, The Maps of Antietam: The Movement to and the Battle of Antietam, September 14 - 18, 1862 plows new ground in the study of the campaign by breaking down the entire campaign in 63 detailed full page original maps. These cartographic creations bore down to the regimental level, offering students of the campaign a unique and fascinating approach to studying what may have been the climactic battle of the war.The Maps of Antietam: The Movement to and the Battle of Antietam, September 14 - 18, 1862 offers 12 action-sections including: - To Sharpsburg - The Eve of Battle - Antietam: Hooker Opens the Battle- Antietam: Hood s Division Moves up and Attacks - Antietam: Mansfield s XII Corps Enters the Battle - Antietam: Sedgwick s Division Drives East- Antietam: Final Actions on the Northern Front- The Sunken Road - The Lower (Burnside s) Bridge- Burnside Advances on Sharpsburg- A. P. Hill s Division Arrives from Harpers Ferry- Antietam: Evening StalemateGottfried s original maps enrich each map section. Keyed to each piece of cartography is detailed text about the units, personnel, movements, and combat (including quotes from eyewitnesses) that make the Antietam story come alive. This presentation allows readers to easily and quickly find a map and text on virtually any portion of the campaign. Serious students of the battle will appreciate the extensive endnotes and will want to take this book with them on their trips to the battlefield.Perfect for the easy chair or for walking hallowed ground, The Maps of Antietam is a seminal work that, like his earlier Gettysburg and First Bull Run studies, belongs on the bookshelf of every serious and casual student of the Civil War.

I WANT TO READ THIS
5/5

The Antietam Campaign by Gary W. Gallagher (Editor)

The Maryland campaign of September 1862 ranks among the most important military operations of the American Civil War. Crucial political, diplomatic, and military issues were at stake as Robert E. Lee and George B. McClellan maneuvered and fought in the western part of the state. The climactic clash came on September 17 at the battle of Antietam, where more than 23,000 men The Maryland campaign of September 1862 ranks among the most important military operations of the American Civil War. Crucial political, diplomatic, and military issues were at stake as Robert E. Lee and George B. McClellan maneuvered and fought in the western part of the state. The climactic clash came on September 17 at the battle of Antietam, where more than 23,000 men fell in the single bloodiest day of the war. Approaching topics related to Lee's and McClellan's operations from a variety of perspectives, contributors to this volume explore questions regarding military leadership, strategy, and tactics, the impact of the fighting on officers and soldiers in both armies, and the ways in which participants and people behind the lines interpreted and remembered the campaign. They also discuss the performance of untried military units and offer a look at how the United States Army used the Antietam battlefield as an outdoor classroom for its officers in the early twentieth century. The contributors are William A. Blair, Keith S. Bohannon, Peter S. Carmichael, Gary W. Gallagher, Lesley J. Gordon, D. Scott Hartwig, Robert E. L. Krick, Robert K. Krick, Carol Reardon, and Brooks D. Simpson. [for catalog, in place of 3rd paragraph]] The contributors: William A. Blair Keith S. Bohannon Peter S. Carmichael Gary W. Gallagher Lesley J. Gordon D. Scott Hartwig Robert E. L. Krick Robert K. Krick Carol Reardon Brooks D. Simpson The Maryland campaign of September 1862 ranks among the most important military operations of the American Civil War. The climactic clash came on September 17 at the battle of Antietam, where more than 23,000 men fell in the single bloodiest day of the war. Exploring topics related to Lee's and McClellan's operations from a variety of perspectives, contributors to this volume examine questions of military leadership, strategy, and tactics; the performance of untried military units; and the ways in which the battle has been remembered. The contributors are William A. Blair, Keith S. Bohannon, Peter S. Carmichael, Gary W. Gallagher, Lesley J. Gordon, D. Scott Hartwig, Robert E. L. Krick, Robert K. Krick, Carol Reardon, and Brooks D. Simpson. The editor is Gary W. Gallagher.

I WANT TO READ THIS
4.7/5

Shepherdstown: Last Clash of the Antietam Campaign, September 19-20, 1862 by Thomas A. McGrath

Hardcover with dust jacket, 256 pages, index, more than 80 photos illustrations and maps. Just downstream from the village called Shepherdstown, near a shallow crossing called Boteler s Ford, a mill was built to exploit the rich vein of cement found nearby. Life in this idyllic region was interrupted by struggles of the still young nation. Few could have imagined the drama Hardcover with dust jacket, 256 pages, index, more than 80 photos illustrations and maps. Just downstream from the village called Shepherdstown, near a shallow crossing called Boteler s Ford, a mill was built to exploit the rich vein of cement found nearby. Life in this idyllic region was interrupted by struggles of the still young nation. Few could have imagined the dramatic events that took place around the ford and mill in September of 1862 when General Robert E. Lee s Army of Northern Virginia entered the region. Union soldiers were sent to oppose this invasion. It is difficult to understate the importance of this offensive, known as the Maryland Campaign of 1862. On September 17th, the two armies clashed around the village of Sharpsburg in the bloodiest single day of combat ever seen in North America. Wounded men streamed across the ford, competing for the road with southern forces still marching toward the conflict. After 12 hours of conflict resulting in 23,000 casualties the two exhausted armies did not renew the contest on the 18th. It was clear to Lee that he must retreat, but also that the crossing would be extremely difficult. While still able to fight, Lee s army was in a precarious and vulnerable position. If pursued, the Army of Virginia might be cornered and destroyed. This campaign was far from over, and only a miracle could save Lee s army. Long overlooked by historians and visitors, the events that took place at Boteler s Ford on September 19 and 20 were critical to the outcome of this campaign. This study for the first time examines in detail the fighting along the Potomac, and places it into the context of the campaign. Long overdue for a detailed study, the events, both heroic and tragic, show that a real battle took place at Shepherdstown. In fact, in terms of troops engaged and the number of killed and wounded, it was the largest battle in what is now the state of West Virginia. ~~Tom Clemens ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ The postscript to America s bloodiest day has been substantially ignored. Until now, no full-length detailed narrative of the September 19-20, 1862, engagement on the banks of the Potomac River near the hamlet of Shepherdstown, Virginia (now West Virginia) has ever been written. The Battle of Shepherdstown is largely over shadowed events at nearby Harper s Ferry and Antietam. Yet this fight was unforgettable by those who participated. At least 162 men were killed or mortally wounded in the engagement 63 Confederates and 99 Federals. Eighty-three of the Federal dead came from the freshly recruited 118th Pennsylvania Infantry (Corn Exchange Regiment). Those men from eastern Pennsylvania soaked the bluffs of Shepherdstown with their life-blood. Even three years later at Appomattox Court House, a North Carolinian commented to the men of the 118th that Didn t we give it to you at Shepherdstown? but the Corn Exchange soldiers replied, Now you re surrendering to us. No single Southern regiment met such a fate the worst loss being suffered by the 14th South Carolina Infantry with 13 men killed followed by the 22nd North Carolina Infantry that lost 12. General Maxcy Gregg s South Carolina brigade had 64 casualties, while General William D. Pender s North Carolina brigade lost 63. General James Archer s Tennesseeans, Alabamians, and Georgians had 55 men killed and wounded. Most of the Federal casualties came from Colonel James Barnes Fifth Corps Brigade with 351 men killed, wounded, captured or missing. Of the 677 known casualties, 307 are Confederate soldiers. The book has more than 80 related photos, illustrations and maps. It is a fine tribute to the soldiers both North and South that tramped and fought at Shepherdstown, taking the reader back to the days where combatants struggled on the banks and bluffs of the Potomac. ~~Patrick A. Schroeder

I WANT TO READ THIS
3.2/5

Burnside's Bridge by Phillip Thomas Tucker

Before the heroic stand of the 20th Maine at Little Round Top, the 2nd and 20th Georgia Infantries, led by Brigadier General Robert Toombs, held off a veritable Yankee juggernaut and triumphed at Burnside's Bridge on Antietam Creek in 1862. This detailed account profiles the troops whose last stand helped prevent the destruction of the Army of Northern Virginia, providing Before the heroic stand of the 20th Maine at Little Round Top, the 2nd and 20th Georgia Infantries, led by Brigadier General Robert Toombs, held off a veritable Yankee juggernaut and triumphed at Burnside's Bridge on Antietam Creek in 1862. This detailed account profiles the troops whose last stand helped prevent the destruction of the Army of Northern Virginia, providing Robert E Lee with yet another chance for a northern invasion.

I WANT TO READ THIS
4.2/5

Crossroads of Freedom: Antietam: The Battle that Changed the Course of the Civil War by James M. McPherson

The Battle of Antietam, fought on September 17, 1862, was the bloodiest single day in American history, with more than 6,000 soldiers killed--four times the number lost on D-Day, and twice the number killed in the September 11th terrorist attacks. In Crossroads of Freedom, America's most eminent Civil War historian, James M. McPherson, paints a masterful account of this pi The Battle of Antietam, fought on September 17, 1862, was the bloodiest single day in American history, with more than 6,000 soldiers killed--four times the number lost on D-Day, and twice the number killed in the September 11th terrorist attacks. In Crossroads of Freedom, America's most eminent Civil War historian, James M. McPherson, paints a masterful account of this pivotal battle, the events that led up to it, and its aftermath. As McPherson shows, by September 1862 the survival of the United States was in doubt. The Union had suffered a string of defeats, and Robert E. Lee's army was in Maryland, poised to threaten Washington. The British government was openly talking of recognizing the Confederacy and brokering a peace between North and South. Northern armies and voters were demoralized. And Lincoln had shelved his proposed edict of emancipation months before, waiting for a victory that had not come--that some thought would never come. Both Confederate and Union troops knew the war was at a crossroads, that they were marching toward a decisive battle. It came along the ridges and in the woods and cornfields between Antietam Creek and the Potomac River. Valor, misjudgment, and astonishing coincidence all played a role in the outcome. McPherson vividly describes a day of savage fighting in locales that became forever famous--The Cornfield, the Dunkard Church, the West Woods, and Bloody Lane. Lee's battered army escaped to fight another day, but Antietam was a critical victory for the Union. It restored morale in the North and kept Lincoln's party in control of Congress. It crushed Confederate hopes of British intervention. And it freed Lincoln to deliver the Emancipation Proclamation, which instantly changed the character of the war. McPherson brilliantly weaves these strands of diplomatic, political, and military history into a compact, swift-moving narrative that shows why America's bloodiest day is, indeed, a turning point in our history.

I WANT TO READ THIS
3.7/5

Antietam Farmsteads: A Guide to the Battlefield Landscape by Keven M. Walker , K.C. Kirkman (Narrator) , Edwin C. Bearss (Foreward) , Ted Alexander (Introduction)

I WANT TO READ THIS
4/5

Too Afraid to Cry: Maryland Civilians in the Antietam Campaign by Kathleen A. Ernst , Kathleen Ernst

Now Available in Paperback First study of the Antietam campaign from civilians' perspectives Many never-before-published accounts of the Battle of Antietam The battle at Antietam Creek, the bloodiest day of the American Civil War, left more than 23,000 men dead, wounded, or missing. Facing the aftermath were the men, women, and children living in the village of Sharpsburg Now Available in Paperback First study of the Antietam campaign from civilians' perspectives Many never-before-published accounts of the Battle of Antietam The battle at Antietam Creek, the bloodiest day of the American Civil War, left more than 23,000 men dead, wounded, or missing. Facing the aftermath were the men, women, and children living in the village of Sharpsburg and on surrounding farms. In Too Afraid to Cry, Kathleen Ernst recounts the dramatic experiences of these Maryland citizens--stories that have never been told--and also examines the complex political web holding together Unionists and Secessionists, many of whom lived under the same roofs in this divided countryside."

I WANT TO READ THIS
4.4/5

Guide to the Battle of Antietam by Jay Luvaas (Editor) , Harold W. Nelson (Editor)

"America's bloodiest day"--the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862--left more dead American soldiers in its wake than any other 24-hour period in history. Antietam and the related battles of the Maryland Campaign that led up to the lethal confrontation did not result in decisive defeats for either side. But they did serve as a brutal warning to an out-gunned, out-comm "America's bloodiest day"--the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862--left more dead American soldiers in its wake than any other 24-hour period in history. Antietam and the related battles of the Maryland Campaign that led up to the lethal confrontation did not result in decisive defeats for either side. But they did serve as a brutal warning to an out-gunned, out-commanded, and out-organized Union army. Eyewitness accounts by battle participants make these guides an invaluable resource for travelers and nontravelers who want a greater understanding of five of the most devastating yet influential years in our nation's history. Explicit directions to points of interest and maps--illustrating the action and showing the detail of troop position, roads, rivers, elevations, and tree lines as they were 130 years ago--help bring the battles to life. In the field, these guides can be used to recreate each battle's setting and proportions, giving the reader a sense of the tension and fear each soldier must have felt as he faced his enemy.

I WANT TO READ THIS
4.5/5

Antietam 1862: The Civil War's Bloodiest Day by Norman S. Stevens

Osprey's examination of the Battle of Antietam, which was one of the critical battles of the American Civil War (1861-1865). The fortunes of the South were riding high after the resounding victory at Second Manassas. While Bragg and Kirby Smith invaded Kentucky, Lee's invasion of Maryland was intended to maintain the Southern offensive momentum and to win the recognition o Osprey's examination of the Battle of Antietam, which was one of the critical battles of the American Civil War (1861-1865). The fortunes of the South were riding high after the resounding victory at Second Manassas. While Bragg and Kirby Smith invaded Kentucky, Lee's invasion of Maryland was intended to maintain the Southern offensive momentum and to win the recognition of the European powers. But his bold plan was compromised - and at the Antietam River the Army of Northern Virginia was fighting for its very life. This title examines the build-up to Hooker's attack, and details the famous clashes at Bloody Lane and Burnside Bridge.

I WANT TO READ THIS
4.9/5

Unholy Sabbath: The Battle of South Mountain in History and Memory by Brian Matthew Jordan

Many readers of Civil War history have been led to believe that the battle of South Mountain (September 14, 1862) was but a trifling skirmish, a preliminary engagement of little strategic or tactical consequence overshadowed by Antietam's horrific carnage just three days later. In fact, the fight was a decisive Federal victory and important turning point in the campaign, a Many readers of Civil War history have been led to believe that the battle of South Mountain (September 14, 1862) was but a trifling skirmish, a preliminary engagement of little strategic or tactical consequence overshadowed by Antietam's horrific carnage just three days later. In fact, the fight was a decisive Federal victory and important turning point in the campaign, as historian Brian Matthew Jordan convincingly argues in his fresh interpretation Unholy Sabbath: The Battle of South Mountain in History and Memory, September 14, 1862.

I WANT TO READ THIS
3.9/5

To Antietam Creek: The Maryland Campaign of September 1862 by D. Scott Hartwig

In September 1862 the Federal army huddled within the defenses of Washington, disorganized and discouraged from its recent defeat at Second Manassas. Confederate General Robert E. Lee led his tough and confident Army of Northern Virginia into Maryland in a bold gamble to force a showdown that would win Southern independence. The future of the Union hung in the balance. The In September 1862 the Federal army huddled within the defenses of Washington, disorganized and discouraged from its recent defeat at Second Manassas. Confederate General Robert E. Lee led his tough and confident Army of Northern Virginia into Maryland in a bold gamble to force a showdown that would win Southern independence. The future of the Union hung in the balance. The campaign that followed lasted only two weeks, but it changed the course of the Civil War. For the sesquicentennial of Antietam and the Maryland Campaign, D. Scott Hartwig delivers a two-volume study of the campaign and climactic battle. This riveting first installment takes the reader from the controversial return of George B. McClellan as commander of the Army of the Potomac through the Confederate invasion, the siege and capture of Harpers Ferry, the day-long Battle of South Mountain, and ultimately, to the eve of the great and terrible Battle of Antietam. 794 pages in total, 652 pages of narrative

I WANT TO READ THIS