Popular Army Of Northern Virginia Books

14+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Army Of Northern Virginia

Discover the list of some best books written on Army Of Northern Virginia by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Army Of Northern Virginia highly popular among the readers worldwide.

5/5

Appomattox: The Last Days of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia by Michael E. Haskew

They endured hardship and deprivation as they fought for their home and ideals - relive the final days of the Army of Northern Virginia. Appomattox: The Last Days of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia encompasses the defense and evacuation of the Confederate capital of Richmond, the horrific combat in the trenches of Petersburg, General Robert E. Lee's withdrawal tow They endured hardship and deprivation as they fought for their home and ideals - relive the final days of the Army of Northern Virginia. Appomattox: The Last Days of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia encompasses the defense and evacuation of the Confederate capital of Richmond, the horrific combat in the trenches of Petersburg, General Robert E. Lee's withdrawal toward the Carolinas in his forlorn hope of a rendezvous with General Joseph E. Johnston's Army of Tennessee to carry on the fight, the relentless pursuit of Union forces, and the ultimate realization that further resistance against overwhelming odds was futile. The Army of Northern Virginia was the fighting soul of the Confederacy in the Eastern Theater of the Civil War. From its inception, it fought against overwhelming odds. Union forces might have occupied territory, but as long as the Confederate army was active in the field, the rebellion was alive. Through four years of bitter conflict, the Army of Northern Virginia and its longtime commander, General Robert E. Lee, became the stuff of legend. By April 1865, its days were numbered. There are many stories of heroism and sacrifice, both Union and Confederate, during the Civil War, and Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia wrote their own epic chapter. Author Michael E. Haskew, a researcher, writer, and editor of many military history subjects for over twenty years, puts the hardship and deprivation suffered by this Army's soldiers while defending their home and ideals into proper perspective.

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4/5

The Army of Northern Virginia by Philip R.N. Katcher , Michael Youens (Illustrator)

On June 27, 1862, with the American Civil War already a year old, General Robert E. Lee assumed personal command of troops engaged in driving the Federal Army of the Potomac out of Richmond – troops which would henceforth be known as The Army of Northern Virginia. Philip Katcher explores in absorbing detail all aspects of the army, including infantry, cavalry, artillery, t On June 27, 1862, with the American Civil War already a year old, General Robert E. Lee assumed personal command of troops engaged in driving the Federal Army of the Potomac out of Richmond – troops which would henceforth be known as The Army of Northern Virginia. Philip Katcher explores in absorbing detail all aspects of the army, including infantry, cavalry, artillery, technical and medical corps, paying particular attention to equipment, weapons and uniforms. Contemporary and museum photographs, together with the author's expert text, combine to paint a vivid and accurate picture of what life was like for the average confederate soldier.

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3/5

Damage Them All You Can: Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia by George Walsh

“Damage them all you can,” the patrician Lee exhorts, and his Southern army, ragtag in uniform and elite in spirit, responds ferociously in one battle after another against their Northern enemies—from the Seven Days and the Valley Campaign through Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, from the Wilderness to Spotsylvania to the final siege of Richmond and Petersburg. Lee knows t “Damage them all you can,” the patrician Lee exhorts, and his Southern army, ragtag in uniform and elite in spirit, responds ferociously in one battle after another against their Northern enemies—from the Seven Days and the Valley Campaign through Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, from the Wilderness to Spotsylvania to the final siege of Richmond and Petersburg. Lee knows that the South’s five-and-a-half million white population will be worn down in any protracted struggle by the North’s twenty-two million. He is ever offensive-minded, ever seeking the victory that will destroy his enemies’ will to fight. He uses his much shorter interior lines to rush troops to trouble spots by forced marches and by rail. His cavalry rides on raids around the entire union army. Lee divides his own force time and again, defying military custom by bluffing one wing of the enemy while striking furiously elsewhere. But this book is more than military history. Walsh’s narrative digs deeper, revealing the humanity of Lee and his lieutenants as never before—their nobility and their flaws, their chilling acceptance of death, their tender relations with wives and sweethearts in the midst of carnage. Here we encounter in depth the men who still stir the imagination. The dutiful Robert E. Lee, haunted by his father’s failures; stern and unbending Stonewall Jackson, cut down at the moment of his greatest triumph; stolid James Longstreet, who came to believe he was Lee’s equal as a strategist, the enigmatic George Pickett. These men and scores of others, enlisted men as well as officers, carry the ultimately tragic story of the Army of Northern Virginia forward with heart rending force and bloody impact. As the war progresses we wonder above all else, had orders been strictly obeyed here or daylight lasted an extra hour there, what might have been. Only Appomattox brings an end to such speculation, when the tattered remnants of Lee’s army, both the still living and the shadowy dead, stack their arms at last.

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4.3/5

The Army of Robert E. Lee by Philip R.N. Katcher

A study of how Lee maximised the potential of his Northern Virginia army, structuring it to meet the needs of his extensive campaign in the eastern theatre of the American Civil War, revising it as the battle situation required it and producing a performance which belied its size and firepower.

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3.4/5

War of the Rebellion: The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies and Navies: Series 1 - Volume 27 (Part II): Official Records: Gettysburg: ... Union and Confederate Armies and Navies.) by Robert N. Scott , Marcus Heydinger (Editor)

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4.1/5

Two Great Rebel Armies: An Essay in Confederate Military History by Richard M. McMurry

Richard McMurry compares the two largest Confederate armies, assessing why Lee's Army of Northern Virginia was more successful than the Army of Tennessee. His bold conclusion is that Lee's army was a better army--not just one with a better high command.

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3.1/5

Retreat from Gettysburg: Lee, Logistics, and the Pennsylvania Campaign by Kent Masterson Brown

In a groundbreaking, comprehensive history of the Army of Northern Virginia's retreat from Gettysburg in July 1863, Kent Masterson Brown draws on previously untapped sources to chronicle the massive effort of General Robert E. Lee and his command as they sought to move people, equipment, and scavenged supplies through hostile territory and plan the army's next moves. Brown In a groundbreaking, comprehensive history of the Army of Northern Virginia's retreat from Gettysburg in July 1863, Kent Masterson Brown draws on previously untapped sources to chronicle the massive effort of General Robert E. Lee and his command as they sought to move people, equipment, and scavenged supplies through hostile territory and plan the army's next moves. Brown reveals that even though the battle of Gettysburg was a defeat for the Army of Northern Virginia, Lee's successful retreat maintained the balance of power in the eastern theater and left his army with enough forage, stores, and fresh meat to ensure its continued existence as an effective force.

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4.9/5

The Stonewall Brigade and Hood’s Brigade: The History of the Most Famous Units in Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia during the Civil War by Charles River Editors

*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the battles *Includes a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents April 18, 1861 marked the date Southern forces started pouring into Harper’s Ferry, Virginia. Six days earlier, shots had been fired at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, marking the beginning of the Civil War, and Virginia official *Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the battles *Includes a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents April 18, 1861 marked the date Southern forces started pouring into Harper’s Ferry, Virginia. Six days earlier, shots had been fired at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, marking the beginning of the Civil War, and Virginia officially seceded from the Union April 17. The following day, men arrived in the town where John Brown’s attempted uprising was quelled less than two years earlier. The men came from all portions of the Confederate States of America (C.S.A.) and the border states of Kentucky and Maryland, but the preponderance of volunteers came from Virginia. Once the Confederate troops occupied Harpers Ferry, martial law was declared and so-called “feather bed” Confederate military officers, often referred to as “swells,” were replaced by professional soldiers with military training. One such man who arrived from the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) was Thomas Jonathan Jackson, who on April 27 was ordered by Virginia Governor John Letcher to take control of the troops converging on Harpers Ferry. He did as ordered and began to form what became the renowned Stonewall Brigade. Jackson and his brigade earned the nickname “Stonewall” at First Manassas by turning the tide of that battle, and they would become known as the legendary foot cavalry by bottling up 3 different Union armies in the Shenandoah Valley in 1862. The Stonewall Brigade went on to fight in every major battle in the Eastern theater of the American Civil War, to the extent that of the 6,000 men who fought with the brigade over the course of four years, less than 200 remained by the time General Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse on April 9, 1865. They were organized, trained, and mentored by one of the most revered military leaders in American history, and they made a decisive impact on battles like First Manassas, the 1862 Valley Campaign, and Chancellorsville. The brigade was virtually a spent force by the end of the Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse in May 1864, which took place nearly a year after Stonewall Jackson himself had been mortally wounded at Chancellorsville. Organized in Richmond, Virginia on October 22, 1861, Hood’s Texas Brigade was one of the most formidable fighting forces of the Confederate States of America (C.S.A.) during the American Civil War. At times undisciplined, the men who comprised this brigade were a group of fearless and determined volunteers-turned-soldiers. Over the course of the Civil War, the Texas Brigade engaged over 4,000 men and was comprised of the only Texans to fight with General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia in the Eastern Theater. With the exception of Chancellorsville, these men fought in every major battle in the East, and they also participated in significant battles in the Western Theater. Of the more than 4,000 men who fought with the brigade over the course of the war, approximately 600 remained to surrender at Appomattox. The brigade suffered a horrific casualty rate of sixty-one percent and were lauded for their courage by men such as generals Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, James Longstreet, and Lee. It is estimated that 56,000 Texans served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, yet the approximately 4,000 men, organized into 32 companies, that formed the Texas Brigade were the only Texans who fought in both theaters of operation. They have been compared to the famous Stonewall Brigade in terms of bravery, skill, and fortitude, and naturally, their fighting directly contributed to the outcome of crucial battles like Antietam and Gettysburg. As a result, they helped change the course of history.

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5/5

History of the Doles-Cook Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia, C.S.A. Containing Muster Rolls of Each Company of the Fourth, Twelfth, Twenty-First and Forty-Fourth Georgia Regiments...and a Complete Hi by Henry W. Thomas

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3.7/5

Clear The Confederate Way! The Irish In The Army Of Northern Virginia by Kelly J. O'Grady

Irish participation in the Confederate forces has received considerably less attention than that of the Union. This detailed study examines Irish troops in the Confederacy, their attitude toward pro-Union Irishmen, and offers some informed speculation on the influence of Irish tradition and history on their battlefield actions.

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4.8/5

The Thirty-Seventh North Carolina Troops: Tar Heels in the Army of Northern Virginia by Michael C. Hardy

North Carolina contributed more of her sons to the Confederate cause than any other state. The 37th North Carolina, made up of men from the western part of the state, served in famous battles like Chancellorsville and Gettysburg as well as in lesser known engagements like Hanover Courthouse and New Bern. This is the account of the unit's four years' service, told largely i North Carolina contributed more of her sons to the Confederate cause than any other state. The 37th North Carolina, made up of men from the western part of the state, served in famous battles like Chancellorsville and Gettysburg as well as in lesser known engagements like Hanover Courthouse and New Bern. This is the account of the unit's four years' service, told largely in the soldiers' own words. Drawn from letters, diaries, and postwar articles and interviews, this history of the 37th North Carolina follows the unit from its organization in November 1861 until its surrender at Appomattox. The book includes maps illustrating the unit's position in several engagements, as well as photographs of the key players in the 37th's story. Appendices include a complete roster of the unit and a listing of individuals buried in large sites such as prison cemeteries. A bibliography and index are also included.

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3.8/5

Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee, And The Army Of Northern Virginia, 1862 by William Allan , Robert K. Krick (Introduction)

"No student of the Eastern Theater can afford to be without this unsurpassed narrative."--Civil War News "[A] standard authority. . . . The admirable work of Colonel Allan . . . raised the level of historical writing on the Confederacy."--Douglas Southall Freeman This volume unites two classic Civil War campaign studies by the foremost southern historian of the immediate po "No student of the Eastern Theater can afford to be without this unsurpassed narrative."--Civil War News "[A] standard authority. . . . The admirable work of Colonel Allan . . . raised the level of historical writing on the Confederacy."--Douglas Southall Freeman This volume unites two classic Civil War campaign studies by the foremost southern historian of the immediate postwar era: History of the Campaign of Gen. T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and The Army of Northern Virginia in 1862. Together they comprise a brilliant, breathtaking chronicle of the high tide of the Confederacy in 1862: Jackson's dazzling generalship in the Valley Campaign; Lee's bold offensive during the Seven Days Battle; the stunning Confederate victory at Second Manassas; Lee's decision to carry the war to enemy territory; the capture of Harper's Ferry; the bitterly fought Battle of Sharpsburg; and the bloody, humiliating Federal defeat at Fredericksburg. New introduction by Robert K. Krick

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3.8/5

Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, Virginia by Ralph Happel

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4.3/5

A Scythe of Fire: A Civil War Story of the Eighth Georgia Infantry Regiment by Warren Wilkinson , Steven E. Woodworth

A gripping history of the Civil War through the eyes of the soldiers in one of its most legendary regiments--the Eighth Georgia Infantry--who fought on the forefront of the Civil War's most major battles. The Confederate soldiers of the 8th Georgia Regiment came from all walks of life. They included upstanding men like Melvin Dwinnel, a teacher and a publisher, as well as t A gripping history of the Civil War through the eyes of the soldiers in one of its most legendary regiments--the Eighth Georgia Infantry--who fought on the forefront of the Civil War's most major battles. The Confederate soldiers of the 8th Georgia Regiment came from all walks of life. They included upstanding men like Melvin Dwinnel, a teacher and a publisher, as well as the likes of James Potter Williamson, whose listed occupation was "loafer." They met in Rome, Georgia, in May 1861, and became the first regiment to enlist for the duration of the hostilities--most others held together for a single season. United by a deep love for the land left behind and a fierce determination to fight for their homes and way of life, the men of the 8th persevered through brutal battles, miserable conditions, and dimming prospects of a Confederate victory. Using diaries, letters home to loved ones, and other historical documents, Steven E. Woodworth follows these brave men from the red clay of Georgia, through the Battle of Bull Run, to Maryland, into the bloody battle of Gettysburg, through Tennessee and the brutal Battle of Chickamauga, and finally to their ultimate defeat at Appomattox. Through every struggle, he reveals their motivations and sometimes painful decisions, telling a story of human hopes and fears and ultimately showing this most divisive war at its most personal.

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