Popular Carolinas Campaign Books

5+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Carolinas Campaign

Discover the list of some best books written on Carolinas Campaign by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Carolinas Campaign highly popular among the readers worldwide.

3/5

The Battle Of Bentonville by Mark A. Moore

In this large-format guide to the field where Sherman and Johnston fought their final battle, detailed route and battle maps are keyed to highway historical markers and accompanied by battle descriptions. Reprints of this book are available at: Bentonville Battlefield 5466 Harper House Road Four Oaks, N.C. 27524 Phone: (910) 594-0789 Fax: (910) 594-0074 Email: [email protected] In this large-format guide to the field where Sherman and Johnston fought their final battle, detailed route and battle maps are keyed to highway historical markers and accompanied by battle descriptions. Reprints of this book are available at: Bentonville Battlefield 5466 Harper House Road Four Oaks, N.C. 27524 Phone: (910) 594-0789 Fax: (910) 594-0074 Email: [email protected]

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3/5

The Confederate Surrender at Greensboro: The Final Days of the Army of Tennessee, April 1865 by Robert M. Dunkerly

Drawing upon more than 200 eyewitness accounts, this work chronicles the largest troop surrender of the Civil War, at Greensboro--one of the most confusing, frustrating and tension-filled events of the war. Long overshadowed by Appomattox, this event was equally important in ending the war, and is much more representative of how most Americans in 1865 experienced the confl Drawing upon more than 200 eyewitness accounts, this work chronicles the largest troop surrender of the Civil War, at Greensboro--one of the most confusing, frustrating and tension-filled events of the war. Long overshadowed by Appomattox, this event was equally important in ending the war, and is much more representative of how most Americans in 1865 experienced the conflict's end. The book includes a timeline, organizational charts, an order of battle, maps, and illustrations. It also uses many unpublished accounts and provides information on Confederate campsites that have been lost to development and neglect.

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4.2/5

The Battle of Bentonville March 19, 20, 21, 1865 by Jay Luvaas

Reprint of an article which first appeared in the North Carolina Historical Review, this booklet includes two maps of the battle and photographs of the state battlefield park.

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3.1/5

Bentonville: The Final Battle Of Sherman And Johnston by Nathaniel Cheairs Hughes Jr.

The battle of Bentonville, the only major Civil War battle fought in North Carolina, was the Confederacy's last attempt to stop the devastating march of William Tecumseh Sherman's army north through the Carolinas. Despite their numerical disadvantage, General Joseph E. Johnston's Confederate forces successfully ambushed one wing of Sherman's army on March 19, 1865 but were The battle of Bentonville, the only major Civil War battle fought in North Carolina, was the Confederacy's last attempt to stop the devastating march of William Tecumseh Sherman's army north through the Carolinas. Despite their numerical disadvantage, General Joseph E. Johnston's Confederate forces successfully ambushed one wing of Sherman's army on March 19, 1865 but were soon repulsed. For the Confederates, it was a heroic but futile effort to delay the inevitable: within a month, both Richmond and Raleigh had fallen, and Lee had surrendered. Nathaniel Hughes offers a full-length tactical study of the battle of Bentonville, the only major Civil War battle fought in North Carolina and the Confederacy's last attempt to stop the devastating march of Sherman's army north through the Carolinas. In careful detail, Hughes lays out Confederate and Union troop movements and places the engagement within the larger military framework of the last months of the war. Analyzing the reasons for the initial success and eventual failure of General Joseph E. Johnston's offensive, Hughes maintains that Sherman showed great restraint by remaining committed to the larger goal of reaching Goldsboro rather than stopping to pursue or destroy the defeated Confederates.

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5/5

Last Stand in the Carolinas: The Battle of Bentonville by Mark L. Bradley

The Battle of Bentonville, in which Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's Confederates launched a massive assault against one wing of Gen. William T. Sherman's Federal army, was the military climax of the long overlooked but critical Carolinas Campaign. It was also the Southern Confederacy's final hurrah. Never again would the once-vaunted Army of Tennessee deploy and deliver a grand The Battle of Bentonville, in which Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's Confederates launched a massive assault against one wing of Gen. William T. Sherman's Federal army, was the military climax of the long overlooked but critical Carolinas Campaign. It was also the Southern Confederacy's final hurrah. Never again would the once-vaunted Army of Tennessee deploy and deliver a grand charge against the enemy. Never again would the major rivals of the Western Theater of the war, William T. Sherman and Joe Johnston, lock themselves in combat. The war that had dragged on year after bloody year drew to a close for these armies just thirty-six days after Bentonville, when Johnston surrendered his men at the Bennett farm house on April 26, 1865. Mark L. Bradley has written the definitive account of not only the Battle of Bentonville, but Sherman's entire Carolinas Campaign. With a flair for storytelling, Bradley weaves a compelling and thorough the Tar Heel State. His penetrating biographical sketches of the principle commanders on both sides introduce the readers to the fascinating cast of characters who found themselves deeply involved in one of the war's final dramas. Ultimately, however, this book is about the fighting at Bentonville. In sweeping detail, Bradley examines the intensive combat of March 19-21, 1865. Readers will find themselves carried along with the wind-whipped flags on the Army of Tennessee's final charge; in the muddy, hastily-dug trenches full of fighting and dying Union soldiers attempting to stem the tide of the bitter Southern attacks; and around both Union and Confederates campfires for a personal look at the war from the perspective of the men in the ranks.

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