Popular Cw West Va Books

13+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Cw West Va

Discover the list of some best books written on Cw West Va by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Cw West Va highly popular among the readers worldwide.

3.4/5

The War in Southwest Virginia: 1861-65 by Gary C. Walker

"Walker has done an outstanding job of explaining the Confederate war effort to protect this area of land and its vital resources. . . . It is the Confederate classic on this particular area of study." --Ed Porter, The Lone Star E-Newsletter During the Civil War, Southwest Virginia's resources were essential to the South's war effort, and its railroads were a lifeline to the "Walker has done an outstanding job of explaining the Confederate war effort to protect this area of land and its vital resources. . . . It is the Confederate classic on this particular area of study." --Ed Porter, The Lone Star E-Newsletter During the Civil War, Southwest Virginia's resources were essential to the South's war effort, and its railroads were a lifeline to the rest of the Confederacy. The separation of West Virginia left the area vulnerable to invading Northern armies and led to continual invasions and battles. This area was vital in supplying salt to preserve Southern food and lead for Southern guns. Although Southwest Virginia originally voted to remain part of the Union, support for the developing Confederacy soon grew. Virginia elected to secede from the nation and greatly aided the South in the war. Walker presents a detailed account of the operations in Southwest Virginia. In gripping narrative, he relates the effects of the war on the individual soldier and the nation as a whole. Each major battle over the course of four grueling years is retold, and each strategic decision is examined so that the war itself turns into a human effort, an exhausting struggle to retain the lands in Southwest Virginia for the South. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Gary C. Walker has been a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans for more than thirty years and has been recognized by the State of South Carolina Legislature for his many accomplishments in Civil War history. Walker is a member of several historic and preservation groups and often participates in Civil War reenactments. He is the author of Civil War Tales, Hunter's Fiery Raid through Virginia Valleys, Confederate Coloring and Learning Book, A General History of the Civil War: The Southern Point of View, and Son of the South, a novel set in Civil War-era Virginia, all published by Pelican.

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3.6/5

Jack Mays War: Colonel Andrew Jackson May and the Civil War in Eastern Kentucky, Eastern Tennessee, and Southwest Virginia by Robert Perry

Historians usually assume that the battles fought in Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Eastern Tennessee played an insignificant role in the outcome of the Civil War. This book challenges that assumption. Focusing on the career of Colonel Andrew Jackson May, for whom the defense of the region was a personal crusade, it reveals that the victories which the Confed Historians usually assume that the battles fought in Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Eastern Tennessee played an insignificant role in the outcome of the Civil War. This book challenges that assumption. Focusing on the career of Colonel Andrew Jackson May, for whom the defense of the region was a personal crusade, it reveals that the victories which the Confederates won in this theater, allowing them to retain control of Preston's Saltworks and the Virginia-Tennessee railroad, preserved the integrity of the Confederacy and thereby prolonged the war.

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4.2/5

The Civil War in Greenbrier County, West Virginia by Tim McKinney

Between 1861 and 1865 more than 60,000 warriors of the Blue and Grey traversed Greenbrier County. A careful review of the Official Records of the War of the Rebellion, published by the United States Government years after the war, reveals more than 1,400 pages of letters, orders, dispatches and other documents relevant to the Civil War in Greenbrier County. From this fact Between 1861 and 1865 more than 60,000 warriors of the Blue and Grey traversed Greenbrier County. A careful review of the Official Records of the War of the Rebellion, published by the United States Government years after the war, reveals more than 1,400 pages of letters, orders, dispatches and other documents relevant to the Civil War in Greenbrier County. From this fact we may glean some idea just how much "war" Greenbrier's residents were subjected to. The tale of David Creigh, "The Greenbrier Martyr" reminds us that it was not only the actual combatants who paid a heavy price during those four bloody years. The counties famed Greenbrier resort saw frequent use as military hospital, field infirmary, supply depot, and army headquarters. To it flocked men and officers of the North and South, including John S. Mosby, destined to become known as the legendary "Grey Ghost" of the Confederacy. The war years were indeed, "a time to try men's souls."

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4.5/5

On Our Own Soil: William Lowther Jackson and the Civil War in West Virginia's Mountains by Ronald V. Hardway

Judge William Lowther Jackson, of Parkersburg, was a brigadier general in the Confederate army, commanding the Nineteenth and Twentieth Virginia cavalries. The most fascinating aspect of this Civil War hero is the almost complete erasure of his name from most historical annals. On Our Own Soil hopes to change that by taking an honest and unbiased look at the life, career, Judge William Lowther Jackson, of Parkersburg, was a brigadier general in the Confederate army, commanding the Nineteenth and Twentieth Virginia cavalries. The most fascinating aspect of this Civil War hero is the almost complete erasure of his name from most historical annals. On Our Own Soil hopes to change that by taking an honest and unbiased look at the life, career, and character of William Jackson. Jackson led the first Confederate regiment in northwestern Virginia, defending the South's western front with only a few companies of inexperienced volunteers. He later served on his well-known cousin Stonewall's staff. During the last year of the war, Jackson's troops bravely defended the Shenandoah Valley. Poor communication, miserable conditions, and unending foot travel continually challenged Jackson, but he persevered throughout. After the war, Jackson was run out of Parkersburg, and exiled to Kentucky. The little surviving history of his units labels them as misfits, outlaws and horse thieves. Yet when Civil War records are examined, Jackson's units are found to have performed efficiently in every campaign in which they participated. Many Confederate leaders revered Jackson. The question is: Why did West Virginia reject William L. Jackson? A reading of On Our Own Soil will hopefully help elevate Jackson to his rightful place in history as a loyal public servant and judicious leader.

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4.2/5

The Battle of White Sulphur Springs: Averell Fails to Secure West Virginia (The History Press) (Civil War Sesquicentennial) by Eric J. Wittenberg

Though West Virginia was founded for the purpose of remaining loyal to the Union, severing ties with Virginia, home of the capital of the Confederacy, would prove difficult. West Virginia's fate would be tested on its battlegrounds. In August 1863, Union general William Woods Averell led a six-hundred-mile raid culminating in the Battle of White Sulphur Springs in Greenbri Though West Virginia was founded for the purpose of remaining loyal to the Union, severing ties with Virginia, home of the capital of the Confederacy, would prove difficult. West Virginia's fate would be tested on its battlegrounds. In August 1863, Union general William Woods Averell led a six-hundred-mile raid culminating in the Battle of White Sulphur Springs in Greenbrier County. Colonel George S. Patton, grandfather of the legendary World War II general, met Averell with a dedicated Confederate force. After a fierce two-day battle, Patton defeated Averell, forcing him to retreat. Civil War historian Eric J. Wittenberg presents a fascinating in-depth analysis of the proceedings in the first book-length study of this important battle.

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4.7/5

West Virginia and the Civil War: Mountaineers Are Always Free by Mark A. Snell

The only state born as a result of the Civil War, West Virginia was the most divided state in the nation. About forty thousand of its residents served in the combatant forces about twenty thousand on each side. The Mountain State also saw its fair share of battles, skirmishes, raids and guerrilla warfare, with places like Harpers Ferry, Philippi and Rich Mountain becoming The only state born as a result of the Civil War, West Virginia was the most divided state in the nation. About forty thousand of its residents served in the combatant forces about twenty thousand on each side. The Mountain State also saw its fair share of battles, skirmishes, raids and guerrilla warfare, with places like Harpers Ferry, Philippi and Rich Mountain becoming household names in 1861. When the Commonwealth of Virginia seceded from the Union on April 17, 1861, leaders primarily from the northwestern region of the state began the political process that eventually led to the creation of West Virginia on June 20, 1863. Renowned Civil War historian Mark A. Snell has written the first thorough history of these West Virginians and their civil war in more than fifty years.

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3.4/5

The Battle Of Piedmont And Hunter's Raid On Staunton: The 1864 Shenandoah Campaign by Scott C. Patchan

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3/5

Grumble: The W. E. Jones Brigade of 1863-1864 by Dobbie Edward Lambert

A truly gripping account of Confederate Cavalry Commander W. E. "Grumble" Jones and his brigade of Virginians during the East Tennessee Campaign of 1863 and the Operations of Cumberland Gap in 1864. This brigade was composed of the 8th and 21st Virginia Cavalry Regiments and the 27th, 34th, 36th and 37th Virginia Cavalry Battalions.

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3.6/5

The Last Confederate General: John C. Vaughn and His East Tennessee Cavalry by Charles Larry Gordon

John Crawford Vaughn was one of the most famous men in Tennessee in the mid-nineteenth century. He was the first man to raise an infantry regiment in the state--and one of the very last Confederate generals to surrender. History has not been kind to Vaughn, who finally emerges from the shadows in this absorbing assessment of his life and military career. Making use of rece John Crawford Vaughn was one of the most famous men in Tennessee in the mid-nineteenth century. He was the first man to raise an infantry regiment in the state--and one of the very last Confederate generals to surrender. History has not been kind to Vaughn, who finally emerges from the shadows in this absorbing assessment of his life and military career. Making use of recent research and new information, Larry Gordon’s biography follows Vaughn to Manassas, Vicksburg and other crucial battles; it shows him as a close friend of Jefferson Davis, and Davis’s escort during the final month of the war. And it considers his importance as one of the few Confederate generals to return to Tennessee after Reconstruction, where he became President of the State Senate. Gordon examines Vaughn’s (hitherto unknown) location on the field of crucial battles; his multiple wounds; the fact that his wife and family, captured by Union soldiers, were the only family members of a Confederate general incarcerated as hostages during the Civil War; and the effect of this knowledge on his performance as a military commander. Finally, the book is as valuable for its view of this little understood figure as it is for the light it casts on the culture of his day.

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3.4/5

Battle at Corricks Ford by W. Hunter Lesser

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3.4/5

General William Averell's Salem Raid: Breaking the Knoxville Supply Line by Darrell L. Collins

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3.7/5

The Battle of Scary Creek: Military Operations in the Kanawha Valley, April-July 1861 by Terry Lowry

"It was a deed of insignificant affair, but we exaggerated it into a deed of great valor and importance." With West Virginia's rugged terrain, the entire area precluded any successful military operations of any size, so the small affairs that did occur, especially those of the Kanawha Valley, are overshadowed by the larger more important campaigns elsewhere. Yet historians "It was a deed of insignificant affair, but we exaggerated it into a deed of great valor and importance." With West Virginia's rugged terrain, the entire area precluded any successful military operations of any size, so the small affairs that did occur, especially those of the Kanawha Valley, are overshadowed by the larger more important campaigns elsewhere. Yet historians can't ignore that during the early months of the Civil War, the Kanawha Valley was a vital and strategic area to both armies.

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3.4/5

The Jones-Imboden Raid: The Confederate Attempt to Destroy the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad and Retake West Virginia by Darrell L. Collins

When Virginia seceded from the United States in 1861, its western counties showed very little popular support for the Confederacy, and loyalist bands of bushwhackers, partisans and guerillas drove most Southern sympathizers from the region. Most inconvenient for the Confederacy was the fact that these counties (which later would become West Virginia) housed the Baltimore a When Virginia seceded from the United States in 1861, its western counties showed very little popular support for the Confederacy, and loyalist bands of bushwhackers, partisans and guerillas drove most Southern sympathizers from the region. Most inconvenient for the Confederacy was the fact that these counties (which later would become West Virginia) housed the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, which connected Washington with the Midwest's vast wealth of manpower and supplies. This work covers the Confederacy's 1863 attempt to invade West Virginia and destroy the critical B&O line. Rich with oral history, the book gives a detailed, personal account of the ultimately unsuccessful Jones-Imboden Raid.

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