Popular Guinea Bissau Books

14+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Guinea Bissau

Discover the list of some best books written on Guinea Bissau by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Guinea Bissau highly popular among the readers worldwide.

3.9/5

L'ultime tragédie by Abdulai Sila

La tragédie a toujours deux versants. L'un tragique pour pleurer, l'autre comique, pour rire aux larmes. L'ultime tragédie n'échappe pas à cette ambivalence et présente deux aspects : celui du colonisateur, convaincu de ses pouvoirs et celui du colonisé à la recherche de ses droits. Outre les relations complexes qui se tissent entre ces personnages, s'affirme un autre élém La tragédie a toujours deux versants. L'un tragique pour pleurer, l'autre comique, pour rire aux larmes. L'ultime tragédie n'échappe pas à cette ambivalence et présente deux aspects : celui du colonisateur, convaincu de ses pouvoirs et celui du colonisé à la recherche de ses droits. Outre les relations complexes qui se tissent entre ces personnages, s'affirme un autre élément, le style novateur du roman, qui, par un judicieux recours au kriol, nous entraîne à la découverte des couleurs locales...

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3.3/5

Return to the Source: Selected Speeches of Amilcar Cabral by Amilcar Cabral

Amilcar Cabral, who was the Secretary-General of the African Party for the Independence of Guinea and the Cape Verde Islands (PAIGC), was assassinated by Portuguese agents on January 20, 1973. Under his leadership, the PAIGC liberated three-quarters of the countryside of Guinea in less than ten years of revolutionary struggle. Cabral distinguished himself among modern revo Amilcar Cabral, who was the Secretary-General of the African Party for the Independence of Guinea and the Cape Verde Islands (PAIGC), was assassinated by Portuguese agents on January 20, 1973. Under his leadership, the PAIGC liberated three-quarters of the countryside of Guinea in less than ten years of revolutionary struggle. Cabral distinguished himself among modern revolutionaries by the long and careful preparation, both theoretical and practical, which he undertook before launching the revolutionary struggle, and, in the course of the preparation, became one of the world's outstanding theoreticians of anti-imperialist struggle. This volume contains some of the principal speeches Cabral delivered in his last years during visits to the United States. The first is his speech to the fourth Commission of the United Nations General Assembly on October 16, 1972, on "Questions of Territories Under Portuguese Administration." His brilliant speeches on "National Liberation and Culture" (1970) and "Identity and Dignity in the Context of the National Liberation Struggle" (1972) follow.

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3.4/5

The Ringtone and the Drum: Travels in the World's Poorest Countries by Mark Weston

Laced with danger, packed with novel insights and told with a humane voice, The Ringtone and the Drum relates the fascinating tale of Mark Weston’s travels in West Africa. His journey through Guinea-Bissau, Sierra Leone and Burkina Faso touches a dizzying array of subjects, including the consequences of civil war, mounting religious strife and the challenges of globalisati Laced with danger, packed with novel insights and told with a humane voice, The Ringtone and the Drum relates the fascinating tale of Mark Weston’s travels in West Africa. His journey through Guinea-Bissau, Sierra Leone and Burkina Faso touches a dizzying array of subjects, including the consequences of civil war, mounting religious strife and the challenges of globalisation. Along the way, the stories of those he meets offer a deeply personal perspective on the lives of some of the least privileged individuals on earth.

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3.4/5

Unity and Struggle by Amilcar Cabral (Introduction) , Basil Davidson , Basil Risbridger Davidson (Introduction)

Cabral is among the great figures of our time -- these texts provide the evidence.

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3/5

The Rift: A New Africa Breaks Free by Alex Perry

A vivid, powerful and controversial look at how the world gets Africa wrong, and how a resurgent Africa is forcing it to think again. Africa has long been misunderstood--and abused--by outsiders. Correspondent Alex Perry traveled the continent for most of a decade, meeting with entrepreneurs and warlords, professors and cocaine smugglers, presidents and jihadis. Beginning w A vivid, powerful and controversial look at how the world gets Africa wrong, and how a resurgent Africa is forcing it to think again. Africa has long been misunderstood--and abused--by outsiders. Correspondent Alex Perry traveled the continent for most of a decade, meeting with entrepreneurs and warlords, professors and cocaine smugglers, presidents and jihadis. Beginning with a devastating investigation into a largely unreported war crime-in 2011, when the US and the major aid agencies helped cause a famine in which 250,000 Somalis died-he finds Africa at a moment of furious self-assertion. To finally win their freedom, Africans must confront three last false prophets-Islamists, dictators and aid workers-who would keep them in their bonds. Beautifully written, intimately reported, and sure to spark debate, THE RIFT passionately argues that a changing Africa revolutionizes our ideas of it, and of ourselves.

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4.1/5

Entre o Ser e o Amar by Odete Costa Semedo

No que foi o seu primeiro livro de poesia, Odete Semedo explora o bilinguismo de Cabo Verde ao publicar alguns dos poemas tanto em português como em crioulo, “de modo a proporcionar aos leitores um espaço de lazer e encontro consigo mesmo”. Nem todos foram publicados nas duas versões dado que em alguns casos, a tradução fá-los perder autenticidade, nas palavras da autora.

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4.1/5

The Scramble for Africa: The White Man's Conquest of the Dark Continent from 1876 to 1912 by Thomas Pakenham

White Man's Conquest of the Dark Continent from 1876 to 1912

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4.2/5

Portugal's Guerrilla Wars in Africa: Lisbon's Three Wars in Angola, Mozambique and Portuguese Guinea 1961-74 by Al J. Venter

Portugal's three wars in Africa in Angola, Mozambique and Portuguese Guinea (Guine'-Bissau today) lasted almost 13 years - longer than the United States Army fought in Vietnam. Yet they are among the most underreported conflicts of the modern era. Commonly referred to as Lisbon's Overseas War (Guerra do Ultramar) or in the former colonies, the War of Liberation (Guerra de Portugal's three wars in Africa in Angola, Mozambique and Portuguese Guinea (Guine'-Bissau today) lasted almost 13 years - longer than the United States Army fought in Vietnam. Yet they are among the most underreported conflicts of the modern era. Commonly referred to as Lisbon's Overseas War (Guerra do Ultramar) or in the former colonies, the War of Liberation (Guerra de Libertaao), these struggles played a seminal role in ending white rule in Southern Africa. Though hardly on the scale of hostilities being fought in South East Asia, the casualty count by the time a military coup d'e'tat took place in Lisbon in April 1974 was significant. It was certainly enough to cause Portugal to call a halt to violence and pull all its troops back to the Metropolis. Ultimately, Lisbon was to move out of Africa altogether, when hundreds of thousands of Portuguese nationals returned to Europe, the majority having left everything they owned behind. Independence for all the former colonies, including the Atlantic islands, followed soon afterwards. Lisbon ruled its African territories for more than five centuries, not always undisputed by its black and mestizo subjects, but effectively enough to create a lasting Lusitanian tradition. That imprint is indelible and remains engraved in language, social mores and cultural traditions that sometimes have more in common with Europe than with Africa. Today, most of the newspapers in Luanda, Maputo - formerly Lourenco Marques - and Bissau are in Portuguese, as is the language taught in their schools and used by their respective representatives in international bodies to which they all subscribe. Indeed, on a recent visit to Central Mozambique in 2013, a youthful member of the American Peace Corps told this author that despite having been embroiled in conflict with the Portuguese for many years in the 1960s and 1970s, he found the local people with whom he came into contact inordinately fond of their erstwhile 'colonial overlords'. As a foreign correspondent, Al Venter covered all three wars over more than a decade, spending lengthy periods in the territories while going on operations with the Portuguese army, marines and air force. In the process, he wrote several books on these conflicts, including a report on the conflict in Portuguese Guinea for the Munger Africana Library of the California Institute of Technology. Portugal's Guerrilla Wars in Africa represents an amalgam of these efforts. At the same time, this book is not an official history, but rather a journalist's perspective of military events as viewed by somebody who has made a career of reporting on overseas wars, Africa's especially. Venter's camera was always at hand; most of the images used between these covers are his. His approach is both intrusive and personal and he would like to believe that he has managed to record for posterity a tiny but vital segment of African history.

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3.4/5

Mistida by Abdulai Sila

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4.1/5

Para Vasco: poemas da Guiné-Bissau / For Vasco: poems from Guinea-Bissau by Ana Raquel Lourenco Fernandes (Translator) , Tula Hatagima (Translator) , Jonathan Morley (Translator) , Jose Lingna Nafafe (Translator) , Ana Teresa Brizio Marques dos Santos (Translator

Para Vasco (For Vasco) is the first in Heaventree's series of translations of Lusophone African poetry. Dedicated to Vasco Cabral, the late freedom fighter, politician and man of letters, this collection, presented in Portuguese and English, represents the first opportunity for the English-speaking world to read the poetry of Guinea-Bissau. Beginning with poems of the war Para Vasco (For Vasco) is the first in Heaventree's series of translations of Lusophone African poetry. Dedicated to Vasco Cabral, the late freedom fighter, politician and man of letters, this collection, presented in Portuguese and English, represents the first opportunity for the English-speaking world to read the poetry of Guinea-Bissau. Beginning with poems of the war for independence, and moving through the postcolonial period to highlight contemporary writers its diversity of styles and gradual unshackling of poetry from the imperatives of the anticolonial struggle make it a significant contribution to the growing canon of West African literatures.

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4.9/5

Africa and the War on Drugs by Neil Carrier , Gernot Klantschnig

Nigerian drug lords in UK prisons, khat-chewing Somali pirates hijacking Western ships, crystal meth-smoking gangs controlling South Africa's streets, and narco-traffickers corrupting the state in Guinea-Bissau: these are some of the vivid images surrounding drugs in Africa which have alarmed policymakers, academics and the general public in recent years. In this revealing Nigerian drug lords in UK prisons, khat-chewing Somali pirates hijacking Western ships, crystal meth-smoking gangs controlling South Africa's streets, and narco-traffickers corrupting the state in Guinea-Bissau: these are some of the vivid images surrounding drugs in Africa which have alarmed policymakers, academics and the general public in recent years. In this revealing and original book, the authors weave these aspects into a provocative argument about Africa's role in the global trade and control of drugs. In doing so, they show how foreign-inspired policies have failed to help African drug users but have strengthened the role of corrupt and brutal law enforcement officers, who are tasked with halting the export of heroin and cocaine to European and American consumer markets. A vital book on an overlooked front of the so-called war on drugs.

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4.8/5

The Radiance of the King by Camara Laye , James Kirkup (Translator)

At the beginning of this masterpiece of African literature, Clarence, a white man, has been shipwrecked on the coast of Africa. Flush with self-importance, he demands to see the king, but the king has just left for the south of his realm. Traveling through an increasingly phantasmagoric landscape in the company of a beggar and two roguish boys, Clarence is gradually stripp At the beginning of this masterpiece of African literature, Clarence, a white man, has been shipwrecked on the coast of Africa. Flush with self-importance, he demands to see the king, but the king has just left for the south of his realm. Traveling through an increasingly phantasmagoric landscape in the company of a beggar and two roguish boys, Clarence is gradually stripped of his pretensions, until he is sold to the royal harem as a slave. But in the end Clarence’s bewildering journey is the occasion of a revelation, as he discovers the image, both shameful and beautiful, of his own humanity in the alien splendor of the king. Camara Laye published his first novel in 1953, the autobiographical L'Enfant noir (The African Child, also published under the title The Dark Child). It follows his own journey from childhood in Kouroussa, his education in Conakry, and eventual departure for France. The book won the Prix Charles Veillon in 1954. L'Enfant noir was followed the next year by Le Regard du roi (The Radiance of the King).

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3.6/5

The King of Kahel by Tierno Monénembo , Nicholas Elliott (Translator)

Tierno Monenembo's The King of Kahel was originally published in France in 2008 and was the winner of the French literary prize, the prix Renaudot, which is awarded to the author of an outstanding original novel.  Loosely based on the life of Olivier de Sanderval, a man who journeyed to Guinea to build an empire by conquering the hostile region of Fouta Djallon, the book e Tierno Monenembo's The King of Kahel was originally published in France in 2008 and was the winner of the French literary prize, the prix Renaudot, which is awarded to the author of an outstanding original novel.  Loosely based on the life of Olivier de Sanderval, a man who journeyed to Guinea to build an empire by conquering the hostile region of Fouta Djallon, the book exposes how Sanderval braves all dangers to build a railway that will bring modern civilization to Africa.

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4.1/5

Guinea-Bissau by Jesse Russell (Editor) , Ronald Cohn (Editor)

High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! The Republic of Guinea-Bissau i/ˈɡɪni bɪˈsaʊ/ (Portuguese: Rep�blica da Guin�-Bissau, pronounced: ) is a country in West Africa. It is bordered by Senegal to the north, and Guinea to the south and east, with the Atlantic Ocean to its west.

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