Popular Southern War For Independance Books

14+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Southern War For Independance

Discover the list of some best books written on Southern War For Independance by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Southern War For Independance highly popular among the readers worldwide.

4/5

Europe Looks at the Civil War: An Anthology by Belle Becker Sideman

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4.3/5

A Constitutional View Of The Late War Between The States (2 Vols) by Alexander H. Stephens

Stephens was Vice President of the Confederacy, and a senator with a brilliant legal mind, skilled in debate. After the war, Stephens took up his pen to explain his view of states rights and the right of secession in this two-volume set. The second volume is in the form of a dialogue taking place at his home, Liberty Hall, between himself and various opponents.

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4.5/5

States' Rights and the Union: Imperium in Imperio, 1776-1876 by Forrest McDonald

Forrest McDonald has long been recognized as one of our most respected and provocative intellectual historians. With this new book, he once again delivers an illuminating meditation on a major theme in American history and politics. Elegantly and accessibly written for a broad readership, McDonald's book provides an insightful look at states' rights--an issue that continues Forrest McDonald has long been recognized as one of our most respected and provocative intellectual historians. With this new book, he once again delivers an illuminating meditation on a major theme in American history and politics. Elegantly and accessibly written for a broad readership, McDonald's book provides an insightful look at states' rights--an issue that continues to stir debate nationwide. From constitutional scholars to Supreme Court justices to an electorate that's grown increasingly wary of federal power, the concept of states' rights has become a touchstone for a host of political and legal controversies. But, as McDonald shows, that concept has deep roots that need to be examined if we're to understand its implications for current and future debates. McDonald's study revolves around the concept of imperium in imperio--literally "sovereignty within sovereignty" or the division of power within a single jurisdiction. With this broad principle in hand, he traces the states' rights idea from the Declaration of Independence to the end of Reconstruction and illuminates the constitutional, political, and economic contexts in which it evolved. Although the Constitution, McDonald shows, gave the central government expansive powers, it also legitimated the doctrine of states' rights. The result was an uneasy tension and uncertainty about the nature of the central government's relationship to the states. At times the issue bubbled silently and unseen beneath the surface of public awareness, but at other times it exploded. McDonald follows this episodic rise and fall of federal-state relations from the Hamilton-Jefferson rivalry to the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions, New England's resistance to Jefferson's foreign policy and the War of 1812, the Nullification Controversy, Andrew Jackson's war against the Bank of the United States, and finally the vitriolic public debates that led to secession and civil war. Other scholars have touched upon these events individually, but McDonald is the first to integrate all of them from the perspective of states' rights into one synthetic and magisterial vision. The result is another brilliant study from a masterful historian writing on a subject of great import for Americans.

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3.6/5

Lincoln's Wrath: Fierce Mobs, Brilliant Scoundrels and a President's Mission to Destroy the Press by Jeffrey Manber , Neil Dahlstrom

In the blistering summer of 1861, President Lincoln began pressuring and ordering the physical shutdown of any Northern newspaper that voiced opposition to the war. These attacks were sometimes carried out by soldiers, sometimes by angry mobs under cover of darkness. Either way, the effect was a complete dismantling of the free press. In the midst stood publisher John Hodgs In the blistering summer of 1861, President Lincoln began pressuring and ordering the physical shutdown of any Northern newspaper that voiced opposition to the war. These attacks were sometimes carried out by soldiers, sometimes by angry mobs under cover of darkness. Either way, the effect was a complete dismantling of the free press. In the midst stood publisher John Hodgson, an angry bigot so hated that a local newspaper gleefully reported his defeat in a bar fight. He was also firmly against Lincoln and the war--an opinion he expressed loudly through his newspaper. When his press was destroyed, first by a mob, then by U.S. Marshals "upon authority of the President of the United States," Hodgson decided to take on the entire United States. Thus began a trial in which one small-town publisher risked imprisonment or worse, and the future of free speech hung in the balance. Based on 10 years of original research, Lincoln's Wrath brings to life one of the most gripping, dramatic and unknown stories of U.S. history.

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4.4/5

The Civil War in the Western Territories: Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah by Ray Charles Colton

Between 1861 and 1865 the violent struggles of the Civil War extended into the Western Territories, where they were complicated by the involvement of the Indians. The Confederate leaders had planned to annex a corridor from the Rio Grande in Texas to the California coast. Thus they would have had a pathway to the Pacific Ocean, areas rich in minerals, new territory for the Between 1861 and 1865 the violent struggles of the Civil War extended into the Western Territories, where they were complicated by the involvement of the Indians. The Confederate leaders had planned to annex a corridor from the Rio Grande in Texas to the California coast. Thus they would have had a pathway to the Pacific Ocean, areas rich in minerals, new territory for the expansion of slavery, and valuable military stores and equipment. They soon found that the land was more difficult to conquer than they had anticipated. The people of the Western Territories for the most part remained loyal to the Union, and the Confederate vision of empire failed to materialize. The emphasis in this book is on the Union campaigns against the Confederates and the Indians who sought to take advantage of the confusion of the Civil War. Yet it is also shown that the Western Territories came of age as a result of the conflict. When the Confederate invasion had been repelled, the Union leaders undertook vigorous campaigns for extermination or settlement of the Indians on reservations. Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah all acquired their present boundaries and patterns of state government during the Civil War period.  

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3/5

The South Was Right! by James Ronald Kennedy , Walter Donald Kennedy

Called "A respite from Yankee history whose exclamation point in some typefaces is rather like a cannon being fired," by The Tampa Tribune-Times, The South Was Right! is a book in its second printing after only three months. Ronald and Donald Kennedy have gotten to the root of post-Civil War dissent. Much of Civil War history is untrue because like most history, it is writ Called "A respite from Yankee history whose exclamation point in some typefaces is rather like a cannon being fired," by The Tampa Tribune-Times, The South Was Right! is a book in its second printing after only three months. Ronald and Donald Kennedy have gotten to the root of post-Civil War dissent. Much of Civil War history is untrue because like most history, it is written by the victor. The story we hear is that hundreds of thousands of Southern men went to war over an issue that only affected six percent of the population. Read this book and learn the truth: there was no shining Northern force fighting a moral battle for the sake of ending slavery; there was no oppressive Southern force fighting to preserve it, either; and after the South declared its independence, the Union ruthlessly invaded, leaving Southerners no choice but to defend themselves. Unfortunately, the South lost the struggle and has suffered ever since. It has become an economic colony of the North, used and exploited like other colonies throughout the world. Politically, the North still controls the government and continues to impose its radical social agenda on the rest of the country at the expense of individual liberty. Meanwhile, the Supreme Court, the first federal department to infringe upon the rights of sovereign states, continues to suppress any efforts to reclaim liberty for the individual from the federal government. Today, is a result of the war in which the South lost its right to be a free country, there is a continuing effort to obliterate all symbols dear to Southerners and make sure that the Southern states continue to have fewer rights under the constitution than other states. Furthermore, although home to one-third of the population, the South is represented by one out of nine justices of the Supreme Court, and that only after the greatest struggle. Sure to be one of the most controversial books of the decade, The South Was Right! is an attempt to set the record straight. Nearly a century and a half after the war, the Confederacy still exists and an order of New Unreconstructed Southerners is calling for its reunification. Brothers James Ronald Kennedy and Walter Donald Kennedy represent the spirit of other patriots like Lech Walesa, Light Horse Harry Lee, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, and Mohandas Gandhi who inspired their people to regain their independence. This book, filled with documented evidence supporting all the Kennedys' claims, issues forth a frighteningly realistic picture of a captured people, their struggle to preserve their heritage, and their right to exist as an independent country and as a distinct culture. James Ronald Kennedy was elected as commander for the Louisiana division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans for the years 1989-92 and regularly participates in Civil War re-enactments. Walter Donald Kennedy is the recipient of the Distinguished Service Medal of the National Sons of Confederate Veterans.

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4.1/5

How Few Remain by Harry Turtledove

From the master of alternate history comes an epic of the second Civil War. It was an epoch of glory and success, of disaster and despair... 1881: A generation after the South won the Civil War, America writhed once more in the bloody throes of battle. Furious over the annexation of key Mexican territory, the United States declared total war against the Confederate States o From the master of alternate history comes an epic of the second Civil War. It was an epoch of glory and success, of disaster and despair... 1881: A generation after the South won the Civil War, America writhed once more in the bloody throes of battle. Furious over the annexation of key Mexican territory, the United States declared total war against the Confederate States of America once again. But this was a new kind of war, fought on a lawless frontier where the blue and gray battled not only each other but the Apache, the outlaw, the French, and the English. As Confederate General Stonewall Jackson again demonstrated his military expertise, the North struggled to find a leader who could prove his equal. In the Second War Between the States, the times, the stakes, and the battle lines had changed--and so would history...

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4.3/5

From Union to Empire: Essays in the Jeffersonian Tradition by Clyde N. Wilson

Jeffersonian Democrats, also konw as Southern conservatives, were once a numerous and common American type. They are seldom heard from any more, but for over 30 years Clyde N. Wilson has been examining American history and current events from just such a viewpoint. Wilson, as historian and columnist Joseph Stromberg writes in the foreward, is "the kind of conservative who Jeffersonian Democrats, also konw as Southern conservatives, were once a numerous and common American type. They are seldom heard from any more, but for over 30 years Clyde N. Wilson has been examining American history and current events from just such a viewpoint. Wilson, as historian and columnist Joseph Stromberg writes in the foreward, is "the kind of conservative who is a stalwart defender of federalism and republicanism, and the liberties associated with them. Such conservatives are few and far between these days.... "He is ... one a of a vanishing group of professional historians who do not regard Southern life and history as on dark, Gothic misfortune after another.... "What comes of this is the creative deployment of a Southern persective on American history---one that yields interesting and important insights.... "It is hard to do justice to Wilson's work.... Suffice it to say that there is good, powerful writing here, where an understanding of the value of genuine aristocratic leadership is mixed with the practical wisdom of the plain folk of the South. I have long been waiting for a collection of Wilson's essays and, having seen it, I can say it is well worth careful adn repeated reading."

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4.2/5

America's First Dynasty: The Adamses, 1735-1918 by Richard Brookhiser

They were America's longest lasting dynasty, the closest thing to a royal family our nation has ever known. The Adamses played a leading role in America's affairs for nearly two centuries -- from John, the self-taught lawyer who rose to the highest office in the government he helped to create; to John Quincy, the child prodigy who followed his father to the White House and They were America's longest lasting dynasty, the closest thing to a royal family our nation has ever known. The Adamses played a leading role in America's affairs for nearly two centuries -- from John, the self-taught lawyer who rose to the highest office in the government he helped to create; to John Quincy, the child prodigy who followed his father to the White House and fought slavery in Congress; to Charles Francis, the Civil War diplomat; to Henry, the brilliant scholar and journalist. Indeed, the history of the Adams family can be read as the history of America itself. For when the Adamses "looked at their past, they saw the nation's," writes author Richard Brookhiser. "When they looked at the nation's past, they saw themselves." "America's First Dynasty" charts the family's travels through American history along with an impressive cast of characters, among them George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Ulysses S. Grant, and Theodore Roosevelt. Brookhiser also details the darker side of the Adams experience, from the specters of alcoholism and suicide to the crushing burden of performance passed on from father to son. Yet by putting a human face on this legendary family, Brookhiser succeeds in creating an impassioned, heroic family portrait that the American public is not likely to forget.

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3.1/5

With Malice Toward None: A Biography of Abraham Lincoln by Stephen B. Oates

“Full, fair, and accurate. . . . Certainly the most objective biography of Lincoln ever written.” —Pulitzer Prize-winner David Herbert Donald, New York Times Book Review From preeminent Civil War historian Stephen B. Oates comes the book the Washington Post hails as “the standard one-volume biography of Lincoln.” Oates’ With Malice Toward None is recognized as the seminal b “Full, fair, and accurate. . . . Certainly the most objective biography of Lincoln ever written.” —Pulitzer Prize-winner David Herbert Donald, New York Times Book Review From preeminent Civil War historian Stephen B. Oates comes the book the Washington Post hails as “the standard one-volume biography of Lincoln.” Oates’ With Malice Toward None is recognized as the seminal biography of the Sixteenth President, by one of America’s most prominent historians.

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4.6/5

The Slaveholding Republic: An Account of the United States Government's Relations to Slavery by Don E. Fehrenbacher , Ward M. McAfee (Editor)

William Lloyd Garrison argued--and many leading historians have since agreed--that the Constitution of the United States was a proslavery document. Garrison called it "a covenant with death, and an agreement with hell." But in The Slaveholding Republic, one of America's most eminent historians, Don E. Fehrenbacher, argues against this claim, in a wide-ranging, landmark his William Lloyd Garrison argued--and many leading historians have since agreed--that the Constitution of the United States was a proslavery document. Garrison called it "a covenant with death, and an agreement with hell." But in The Slaveholding Republic, one of America's most eminent historians, Don E. Fehrenbacher, argues against this claim, in a wide-ranging, landmark history that stretches from the Continental Congress to the Presidency of Abraham Lincoln. Fehrenbacher ranges from sharp-eyed analyses of the deal-making behind the "proslavery clauses" of the constitution, to colorful accounts of partisan debates in Congress and heated confrontations with Great Britain (for instance, over slaves taken off American ships and freed in British ports). He shows us that the Constitution itself was more or less neutral on the issue of slavery and that, in the antebellum period, the idea that the Constitution protected slavery was hotly debated (many Northerners would concede only that slavery was protected by state law, not by federal law). Nevertheless, he also reveals that US policy--whether in foreign courts, on the high seas, in federal territories, or even in the District of Columbia--was consistently proslavery. The book concludes with a brilliant portrait of Lincoln. Fehrenbacher makes clear why Lincoln's election was such a shock to the South and shows how Lincoln's approach to emancipation, which seems exceedingly cautious by modern standards, quickly evolved into a "Republican revolution" that ended the anomaly of the United States as a "slaveholding republic." The last and perhaps most important book by a Pulitzer-Prize winning historian, The Slaveholding Republic illuminates one of the most enduring issues in our nation's history.

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4.4/5

The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War by Thomas J. DiLorenzo

A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War Most Americans consider Abraham Lincoln to be the greatest president in history. His legend as the Great Emancipator has grown to mythic proportions as hundreds of books, a national holiday, and a monument in Washington, D.C., extol his heroism and martyrdom. But what if most everything you knew about Lincoln A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War Most Americans consider Abraham Lincoln to be the greatest president in history. His legend as the Great Emancipator has grown to mythic proportions as hundreds of books, a national holiday, and a monument in Washington, D.C., extol his heroism and martyrdom. But what if most everything you knew about Lincoln were false? What if, instead of an American hero who sought to free the slaves, Lincoln were in fact a calculating politician who waged the bloodiest war in american history in order to build an empire that rivaled Great Britain's? In The Real Lincoln, author Thomas J. DiLorenzo uncovers a side of Lincoln not told in many history books and overshadowed by the immense Lincoln legend. Through extensive research and meticulous documentation, DiLorenzo portrays the sixteenth president as a man who devoted his political career to revolutionizing the American form of government from one that was very limited in scope and highly decentralized—as the Founding Fathers intended—to a highly centralized, activist state. Standing in his way, however, was the South, with its independent states, its resistance to the national government, and its reliance on unfettered free trade. To accomplish his goals, Lincoln subverted the Constitution, trampled states' rights, and launched a devastating Civil War, whose wounds haunt us still. According to this provacative book, 600,000 American soldiers did not die for the honorable cause of ending slavery but for the dubious agenda of sacrificing the independence of the states to the supremacy of the federal government, which has been tightening its vise grip on our republic to this very day. You will discover a side of Lincoln that you were probably never taught in school—a side that calls into question the very myths that surround him and helps explain the true origins of a bloody, and perhaps, unnecessary war.

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3.2/5

The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History by Thomas E. Woods Jr.

 “The problem in America isn’t so much what people don’t know; the problem is what people think they know that just ain’t so.”  —Thomas E. Woods   Most Americans trust that their history professors and high school teachers will give students honest and accurate information.   The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History  makes it quite clear that liberal professo  “The problem in America isn’t so much what people don’t know; the problem is what people think they know that just ain’t so.”  —Thomas E. Woods   Most Americans trust that their history professors and high school teachers will give students honest and accurate information.   The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History  makes it quite clear that liberal professors have misinformed our children for generations. Professor Thomas E. Woods, Jr. takes on the most controversial moments of American history and exposes how history books are merely a series of clichés drafted by academics who are heavily biased against God, democracy, patriotism, capitalism and most American family values.   Woods reveals the truth behind many of today's prominent myths.... MYTH:  The First Amendment prohibits school prayer MYTH: The New Deal created great prosperity MYTH:  What the Supreme Court says, goes From the real American “revolutionaries” to the reality of labor unions,  The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History  is all you need for the truth about America—objective and unvarnished.

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3.6/5

The South under siege, 1830-2000: A history of the relations between the North and the South by Frank Conner

This book is that rarity of rarities, a history of the South covering the turbulent 19th and 20th centuries, written from the Southern-conservative viewpoint. Its central theme is the devastating culture-war which various groups of Northern liberals have been waging against the conservative South since the 1830s, using the South as their battleground to defeat limited repu This book is that rarity of rarities, a history of the South covering the turbulent 19th and 20th centuries, written from the Southern-conservative viewpoint. Its central theme is the devastating culture-war which various groups of Northern liberals have been waging against the conservative South since the 1830s, using the South as their battleground to defeat limited republican government under the tenets of Christianity in the U.S. as prescribed by the Constitution, asnd replace that with a socialist nation-state run under the religion of secular humanism. This book identifies key events in American history which, although indisputable, are nevertheless ignored or distorted by the mainstream liberal historians; and it puts those events in proper perspective. The result is a book which reads like the history of an entirely-different country than the one we're accustomed to reading about in most American-history texts. This book tells how Northern capitalists and their politicians used the culture war to support an economic war of their own against the South, which led directly to the 1861 - 1865 War of Northern Aggression, following which the federal government converted the South into the agricultural colonies of the Northern capitalists, governed under bayonet rule, and deliberately held in grinding poverty until WWII. And now the liberal-dominated institutions of the U.S. are systematically discrediting and suppressing the beliefs, values, culture, and true history of the traditional South, in order to destroy the conservative Southerners as a people, and remove the last big roadblock hindering their transformation of the U.S. into a socialist nation-state. "The South Under Siege 1830 - 2000" will be of no interest to ideological liberals; but if you want to know why the U.S. is now divided into red states and blue states; and what is happening to the South right now--and will happen to the rest of the U.S. in the very near future, this is one of the few books that will provide real answers.

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