Popular Arithmetic Books

15+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Arithmetic

Discover the list of some best books written on Arithmetic by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Arithmetic highly popular among the readers worldwide.

3.7/5

Secrets of Mental Math: The Mathemagician's Guide to Lightning Calculation and Amazing Math Tricks by Arthur T. Benjamin , Michael Shermer

These simple math secrets and tricks will forever change how you look at the world of numbers. Secrets of Mental Math will have you thinking like a math genius in no time. Get ready to amaze your friends—and yourself—with incredible calculations you never thought you could master, as renowned “mathemagician” Arthur Benjamin shares his techniques for lightning-quick calculat These simple math secrets and tricks will forever change how you look at the world of numbers. Secrets of Mental Math will have you thinking like a math genius in no time. Get ready to amaze your friends—and yourself—with incredible calculations you never thought you could master, as renowned “mathemagician” Arthur Benjamin shares his techniques for lightning-quick calculations and amazing number tricks. This book will teach you to do math in your head faster than you ever thought possible, dramatically improve your memory for numbers, and—maybe for the first time—make mathematics fun. Yes, even you can learn to do seemingly complex equations in your head; all you need to learn are a few tricks. You’ll be able to quickly multiply and divide triple digits, compute with fractions, and determine squares, cubes, and roots without blinking an eye. No matter what your age or current math ability, Secrets of Mental Math will allow you to perform fantastic feats of the mind effortlessly. This is the math they never taught you in school. Also available as an eBook

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4.6/5

Saxon Math K Home Study Teachers Manual First Edition by Nancy Larson

Saxon math programs produce confident students who are not only able to correctly compute, but also to apply concepts to new situations. These materials gently develop concepts, and the practice of those concepts is extended over a considerable period of time. This is called "incremental development and continual review." Material is introduced in easily understandable pie Saxon math programs produce confident students who are not only able to correctly compute, but also to apply concepts to new situations. These materials gently develop concepts, and the practice of those concepts is extended over a considerable period of time. This is called "incremental development and continual review." Material is introduced in easily understandable pieces (increments), allowing students to grasp one facet of a concept before the next one is introduced. Both facets are then practiced together until another one is introduced. This feature is combined with continual review in every lesson throughout the year. Topics are never dropped but are increased in complexity and practiced every day, providing the time required for concepts to become totally familiar. The teacher's manual employs a unique instructional format. It contains daily lessons, each of which includes pre-class preparation instructions, a list of materials, and the entire scripted lesson. Scripted lessons provide the parent with questioning strategies and language designed to help children understand mathematical concepts. Since the teacher's manual is nonconsumable, it can be used in successive years with the purchase of new student workbooks and meeting books. This first edition Teacher's Manual is for Grade K.

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3.3/5

Life of Fred: Decimals and Percents by Stanley F. Schmidt

The Human Face of Decimals and Percents You know your addition and multiplication tables by heart. You have read Life of Fred: Fractions Now the gateway to algebra—Life of Fred: Decimals and Percents One afternoon and evening with our five-year-old hero and you will learn: Everything you need to begin algebra Why they no longer play football at KITTENS University Why you should n The Human Face of Decimals and Percents You know your addition and multiplication tables by heart. You have read Life of Fred: Fractions Now the gateway to algebra—Life of Fred: Decimals and Percents One afternoon and evening with our five-year-old hero and you will learn: Everything you need to begin algebra Why they no longer play football at KITTENS University Why you should never eat alone at the 5100th Avenue Steak House All fun! Just open & enjoy. Number Systems, Adding and Subtracting Decimals, Multiplying by Ten, Functions and Inverse Functions, Pi, Multiplying Decimals, Whole Numbers, Squaring a Number, Subtracting Mixed Units, Sets and Subsets, Union and Intersection of Sets, Rules of Divisibility, Division of Decimals, Repeating Decimals, Bar Graphs, Prime and Composite Numbers, Consecutive Numbers, the Goldbach Conjecture, Area of a Circle, Dollars vs. Cents, Pie Charts, Conversion between Percents/ Fractions/ Decimals, 40% of 15, 30% off, Distance Equals Rate Times Time, 15% more, Area of a Triangle, Square Roots, Area of a Parallelogram, 13 Is What Percent of 52, Ratio, Ordered Pairs, Graphing, Negative Numbers, Elapsed Time, Probability.

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3.4/5

Life of Fred: Apples by Stanley F. Schmidt

Numbers that Add to 7, Circles, Ellipses, Reading 6:00 on a Clock, 5 + ? = 7, Days of the Week, Leap Years, Spelling February, Dressing for Cold Weather, 15 Degrees Below Zero (–15º), Deciduous Trees, Deciduous Teeth, Counting by Fives, 3x + 4x = 7x, Archimedes 287 B.C. Wrote The Sand Reckoner and Got Killed Being Rude, ante meridiem (a.m.), Donner and Blitz in German, One Numbers that Add to 7, Circles, Ellipses, Reading 6:00 on a Clock, 5 + ? = 7, Days of the Week, Leap Years, Spelling February, Dressing for Cold Weather, 15 Degrees Below Zero (–15º), Deciduous Trees, Deciduous Teeth, Counting by Fives, 3x + 4x = 7x, Archimedes 287 B.C. Wrote The Sand Reckoner and Got Killed Being Rude, ante meridiem (a.m.), Donner and Blitz in German, One Million, Euclid Wrote The Elements, Squares, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, Whales Are Not Fish, The “There Are Zero . . .” Game, Sets, the Popularity of Zero, Why Boats Are Cheaper to Rent in the Winter, Triangles, Herbivores and Carnivores, the Colors of the Rainbow, a King in Checkmate, the Story of the Titanic, ≠ (not equal), x + 4 = 7, One Thousand, Counting by Hundreds, Reading 3:05 on a Clock, Rectangles.

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4.5/5

One Duck, Another Duck by Charlotte Pomerantz , José Aruego (Illustrator) , Ariane Dewey (Illustrator)

Danny and his grandmother go to the pond to see the ducks. "One duck, another duck," counts Danny. "No," says his grandmother. "You know how to count. Count them again." And she is right. Danny does indeed know how to count -- and he proves it in a book that makes counting from one to ten an exciting surprise.

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4.5/5

Life of Fred: Pre-Algebra 2 with Economics by Stanley F. Schmidt

Fred begins his summer vacation. Learn... • How to get rid of snakes in sugar cane fields • The difference between freedom and liberty • How not to bore your horse if you are a jockey • Why Fred couldn't be a movie star and even some algebra and economics, including... Domain and codomain of a function Conversion factors Steps in Solving Word Problems One-to-one Functions, Uni Fred begins his summer vacation. Learn... • How to get rid of snakes in sugar cane fields • The difference between freedom and liberty • How not to bore your horse if you are a jockey • Why Fred couldn't be a movie star and even some algebra and economics, including... Domain and codomain of a function Conversion factors Steps in Solving Word Problems One-to-one Functions, Unit Analysis Key to a Successful Business Five Qualities that Money Should Have Definitions of Capitalism, Socialism, and Communism Payday Loans Interest Rates Partnerships Cardinality of a Set Four Ways to Kill Competition Freedom vs. Liberty Why We Have a High Standard of Living Tariffs Demand Curves Venn Diagrams Ricardo's Law of Comparative Advantage Unlike all other math programs, this one also has: • the Tulip Mania in Holland • A sure-fire way to create 100% employment • the Tragedy of the Commons • how to run a successful hot dog business • what a real $100,000 bill looks like.

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4.1/5

Spooky Hour by Tony Mitton , Guy Parker-Rees (Illustrator)

From the creators of DINOSAURUMPUS! comes their new Halloween picture book about counting. "Listen! Hush! Oooh, what's that sound? The midnight spooks are coming round." Tony Mitton and Guy Parker-Rees team up again to create another fun-filled book. Halloween is the setting as kids rhyme their way through the night and to a spook-filled birthday party. Emphasized sounds su From the creators of DINOSAURUMPUS! comes their new Halloween picture book about counting. "Listen! Hush! Oooh, what's that sound? The midnight spooks are coming round." Tony Mitton and Guy Parker-Rees team up again to create another fun-filled book. Halloween is the setting as kids rhyme their way through the night and to a spook-filled birthday party. Emphasized sounds such as "CLICKETY CLACK" and "HISSSSS!" will allow younger children to enjoy the fun of reading. Parker-Rees's illustrations, in the tradition of DINOSAURUMPUS! and K IS FOR KISSING A COOL KANGAROO, are sure to delight.

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4.7/5

Millions, Billions, & Trillions by David A. Adler , Edward Miller (Illustrator)

The winning nonfiction team returns with a larger-than-life math book that is sure to fascinate young readers. Huge numbers are hard to comprehend. This book explains quantities in terms children can understand. For example, one million dollars could buy two full pizzas a day for more than sixty-eight years.

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3.8/5

Angles Are Easy as Pie by Robert Froman , Byron Barton

Discusses facts about angles and their relationship to triangles, quadrangles, polygons, and circles.

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4.8/5

Can You Count to a Googol? by Robert E. Wells

Introduces the concepts of very large numbers, up to a googol, and multiples of ten.

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4.2/5

Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension by Matt Parker

- Cut pizzas in new and fairer ways! - Fit a 2p coin through an impossibly small hole! - Make a perfect regular pentagon by knotting a piece of paper! - Tie your shoes faster than ever before, saving literally seconds of your life! - Use those extra seconds to contemplate the diminishing returns of an exclamation-point at the end of every bullet-point! - Make a working computer - Cut pizzas in new and fairer ways! - Fit a 2p coin through an impossibly small hole! - Make a perfect regular pentagon by knotting a piece of paper! - Tie your shoes faster than ever before, saving literally seconds of your life! - Use those extra seconds to contemplate the diminishing returns of an exclamation-point at the end of every bullet-point! - Make a working computer out of dominoes! Maths is a game. This book can be cut, drawn in, folded into shapes and will even take you to the fourth dimension. So join stand-up mathematician Matt Parker on a journey through narcissistic numbers, optimal dating algorithms, at least two different kinds of infinity and more.

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3.9/5

Measurement by Paul Lockhart

For seven years, Paul Lockhart s "A Mathematician s Lament" enjoyed a samizdat-style popularity in the mathematics underground, before demand prompted its 2009 publication to even wider applause and debate. An impassioned critique of K 12 mathematics education, it outlined how we shortchange students by introducing them to math the wrong way. Here Lockhart offers the posit For seven years, Paul Lockhart s "A Mathematician s Lament" enjoyed a samizdat-style popularity in the mathematics underground, before demand prompted its 2009 publication to even wider applause and debate. An impassioned critique of K 12 mathematics education, it outlined how we shortchange students by introducing them to math the wrong way. Here Lockhart offers the positive side of the math education story by showing us how math should be done. "Measurement "offers a permanent solution to math phobia by introducing us to mathematics as an artful way of thinking and living. In conversational prose that conveys his passion for the subject, Lockhart makes mathematics accessible without oversimplifying. He makes no more attempt to hide the challenge of mathematics than he does to shield us from its beautiful intensity. Favoring plain English and pictures over jargon and formulas, he succeeds in making complex ideas about the mathematics of shape and motion intuitive and graspable. His elegant discussion of mathematical reasoning and themes in classical geometry offers proof of his conviction that mathematics illuminates art as much as science. Lockhart leads us into a universe where beautiful designs and patterns float through our minds and do surprising, miraculous things. As we turn our thoughts to symmetry, circles, cylinders, and cones, we begin to see that almost anyone can do the math in a way that brings emotional and aesthetic rewards. "Measurement" is an invitation to summon curiosity, courage, and creativity in order to experience firsthand the playful excitement of mathematical work."

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5/5

The Joy of x: A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity by Steven H. Strogatz

A world-class mathematician and regular contributor to the New York Times hosts a delightful tour of the greatest ideas of math, revealing how it connects to literature, philosophy, law, medicine, art, business, even pop culture in ways we never imagined Did O.J. do it? How should you flip your mattress to get the maximum wear out of it? How does Google search the Internet? A world-class mathematician and regular contributor to the New York Times hosts a delightful tour of the greatest ideas of math, revealing how it connects to literature, philosophy, law, medicine, art, business, even pop culture in ways we never imagined Did O.J. do it? How should you flip your mattress to get the maximum wear out of it? How does Google search the Internet? How many people should you date before settling down? Believe it or not, math plays a crucial role in answering all of these questions and more. Math underpins everything in the cosmos, including us, yet too few of us understand this universal language well enough to revel in its wisdom, its beauty — and its joy. This deeply enlightening, vastly entertaining volume translates math in a way that is at once intelligible and thrilling. Each trenchant chapter of The Joy of x offers an “aha!” moment, starting with why numbers are so helpful, and progressing through the wondrous truths implicit in π, the Pythagorean theorem, irrational numbers, fat tails, even the rigors and surprising charms of calculus. Showing why he has won awards as a professor at Cornell and garnered extensive praise for his articles about math for the New York Times, Strogatz presumes of his readers only curiosity and common sense. And he rewards them with clear, ingenious, and often funny explanations of the most vital and exciting principles of his discipline. Whether you aced integral calculus or aren’t sure what an integer is, you’ll find profound wisdom and persistent delight in The Joy of x.

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3.6/5

Prelude to Mathematics by W.W. Sawyer

"No mathematician can be a complete mathematician unless he is also something of a poet." — K. Weierstrass In this lively and stimulating account, noted mathematician and educator W. W. Sawyer (Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto) defines mathematics as "the classification and study of all possible patterns." It is a broad definition, but one that seems appropriate to "No mathematician can be a complete mathematician unless he is also something of a poet." — K. Weierstrass In this lively and stimulating account, noted mathematician and educator W. W. Sawyer (Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto) defines mathematics as "the classification and study of all possible patterns." It is a broad definition, but one that seems appropriate to the great scope and depth of the topic. Indeed, mathematics seems to have few boundaries, either in applications to practical matters or in its mind-stretching excursions into realms of pure abstraction. Gearing his approach to the layman whose grasp of things mathematical may be a bit precarious, Professor Sawyer offers a lucid, accessible introduction to the mathematician's cast of mind. Five well-written preliminary chapters explore the beauty, power and mysticism of mathematics; the role of math as an adjunct in utilitarian matters; and the concepts of pattern, generalization and unification as both tools and goals of mathematical thought. After developing this conceptual groundwork, the author goes on to treat of more advanced topics: non-Euclidean geometry, matrices, projective geometry, determinants, transformations and group theory. The emphasis here is not on mathematics with great practical utility, but on those branches which are exciting in themselves — mathematics which offers the strange, the novel, the apparently impossible — for example, an arithmetic in which no number is larger than four. Mathematicians will appreciate the author's grasp of a wide range of important mathematical topics, and his ability to illuminate the complex issues involved; laymen, especially those with a minimal math background, will appreciate the accessibility of much of the book, which affords not only a portrait of mathematics as a matchless tool for probing the nature of the universe, but a revealing glimpse of that mysterious entity called "the mathematical mind." Professor Sawyer has further enhanced this new Dover edition with updated material on group theory, appearing here in English for the first time.

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3.1/5

What Is Mathematics?: An Elementary Approach to Ideas and Methods by Richard Courant , Herbert Robbins

For more than two thousand years a familiarity with mathematics has been regarded as an indispensable part of the intellectual equipment of every cultured person. Today, unfortunately, the traditional place of mathematics in education is in grave danger. The teaching and learning of mathematics has degenerated into the realm of rote memorization, the outcome of which leads For more than two thousand years a familiarity with mathematics has been regarded as an indispensable part of the intellectual equipment of every cultured person. Today, unfortunately, the traditional place of mathematics in education is in grave danger. The teaching and learning of mathematics has degenerated into the realm of rote memorization, the outcome of which leads to satisfactory formal ability but does not lead to real understanding or to greater intellectual independence. This new edition of Richard Courant's and Herbert Robbins's classic work seeks to address this problem. Its goal is to put the meaning back into mathematics. Written for beginners and scholars, for students and teachers, for philosophers and engineers, What is Mathematics? Second Edition is a sparkling collection of mathematical gems that offers an entertaining and accessible portrait of the mathematical world. Covering everything from natural numbers and the number system to geometrical constructions and projective geometry, from topology and calculus to matters of principle and the Continuum Hypothesis, this fascinating survey allows readers to delve into mathematics as an organic whole rather than an empty drill in problem solving. With chapters largely independent of one another and sections that lead upward from basic to more advanced discussions, readers can easily pick and choose areas of particular interest without impairing their understanding of subsequent parts. Brought up to date with a new chapter by Ian Stewart, What is Mathematics? Second Edition offers new insights into recent mathematical developments and describes proofs of the Four-Color Theorem and Fermat's Last Theorem, problems that were still open when Courant and Robbins wrote this masterpiece, but ones that have since been solved. Formal mathematics is like spelling and grammar - a matter of the correct application of local rules. Meaningful mathematics is like journalism - it tells an interesting story. But unlike some journalism, the story has to be true. The best mathematics is like literature - it brings a story to life before your eyes and involves you in it, intellectually and emotionally. What is Mathematics is like a fine piece of literature - it opens a window onto the world of mathematics for anyone interested to view.

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