Popular Battles Of The American Civil Ear Books

15+ [Hand Picked] Popular Books On Battles Of The American Civil Ear

Discover the list of some best books written on Battles Of The American Civil Ear by popular award winning authors. These book on topic Battles Of The American Civil Ear highly popular among the readers worldwide.

3.7/5

The Lincoln Deception by David O. Stewart

A deathbed confession and a long hidden conspiracy are at the heart of a riveting historical mystery centered on the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. In March 1900, as former Congressman John Bingham of Ohio lies dying, he begins to tell a strange tale to his physician, Dr. Jamie Fraser. Bingham famously prosecuted eight members of John Wilkes Booth's plot to kill Lincoln. A deathbed confession and a long hidden conspiracy are at the heart of a riveting historical mystery centered on the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. In March 1900, as former Congressman John Bingham of Ohio lies dying, he begins to tell a strange tale to his physician, Dr. Jamie Fraser. Bingham famously prosecuted eight members of John Wilkes Booth's plot to kill Lincoln. But during the 1865 trial, conspirator Mary Surratt divulged a secret so explosive it could shatter the republic. Though Bingham takes the secret to his grave, Fraser cannot let go of the mystery. Bored with smalltown medical practice, he begins to investigate, securing an unlikely ally in Speed Cook, a black, college-educated professional ballplayer and would-be newspaper publisher. Cook is fascinated by Fraser's inquiry and, like Fraser, thinks the accepted version of Lincoln's assassination rings false. Was Booth truly the mastermind or were other, more powerful forces pulling the strings? From Maryland to New York City, from Indiana to Washington, Fraser and Cook track down key figures and witnesses, including Mary Surratt's neurotic daughter Anna; Booth's nephew, actor Creston Clarke; and Clarke's attractive business manager, Mrs. Eliza Scott. Piece by piece the truth emerges, separating fact from rumor, innocent from guilty, and revealing a story of greed, ambition, courage, and tragedy. Blending real and fictional characters, The Lincoln Deception is a superbly researched, brilliantly plotted and thoroughly gripping mystery that explores one of the nation's darkest and most fascinating eras and the conspiracy that changed world history.

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3.5/5

Echoes of Thunder: A Guide to the Seven Days Battles by Matt Spruill , Matt Spruill III

Echoes of Thunder is the only guide to the 1862 Seven Days Battles. Taking the reader over the ground where the five battles were fought between the Union and Confederate armies from June 26 to July 1, 1862, the book is for the Civil War expert as well as the newcomer.For each battlefield the book provides information to orient the reader about where the opposing units wer Echoes of Thunder is the only guide to the 1862 Seven Days Battles. Taking the reader over the ground where the five battles were fought between the Union and Confederate armies from June 26 to July 1, 1862, the book is for the Civil War expert as well as the newcomer.For each battlefield the book provides information to orient the reader about where the opposing units were positioned and what happened. Appropriate excerpts from the official records are included, written by commanders whose units were fighting at each stop. This technique of presentation allows the reader to see the development of each battle as the participants and decision makers saw it.A chapter is dedicated to each of the Seven Days Battles: Beaver Dam Creek, Gaines Mill, Savage Station, Glendale, and Malvern Hill. The reader can follow the battles in their entirety from Stop 1 to Stop 30; however, as each chapter is designed to stand alone, the reader can tour the battlefields in any order or visit only selected battlefields.Detailed topographical maps show the battlefield areas as they were in 1862 and are marked with unit locations and movements. Modern day road maps and instructions allow the reader to follow the same routes—from battlefield to battlefield—used by the armies. Operational and planning maps show overall situations and maneuver plans.Because of the detailed maps and orientation information, a reader can use Echoes of Thunder effectively even without being on the battlefields, making this a valuable reference work on this important series of battles.

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3.2/5

Extraordinary Circumstances: The Seven Days Battles by Brian K. Burton

The first campaign in the Civil War in which Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia, the Seven Days Battles were fought southeast of the Confederate capital of Richmond in the summer of 1862. Lee and his fellow officers, including "Stonewall" Jackson, James Longstreet, A. P. Hill, and D. H. Hill, pushed George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac from the gates of R The first campaign in the Civil War in which Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia, the Seven Days Battles were fought southeast of the Confederate capital of Richmond in the summer of 1862. Lee and his fellow officers, including "Stonewall" Jackson, James Longstreet, A. P. Hill, and D. H. Hill, pushed George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac from the gates of Richmond to the James River, where the Union forces reached safety. Along the way, Lee lost several opportunities to harm McClellan. The Seven Days have been the subject of numerous historical treatments, but none more detailed and engaging than Brian K. Burton's retelling of the campaign that lifted Southern spirits, began Lee's ascent to fame, and almost prompted European recognition of the Confederacy.

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3.8/5

A Guide to the Major Battles of the Civil War by U.S. National Park Service

The text of this guide to the major battles of America’s Civil War (equivalent in length to a physical book of approximately 30 pages) was prepared by the U.S. Department of the Interior’s National Park Service, which sponsors the American Battlefield Protection Program. Learn about 23 major battles of the Civil War: Antietam, First Bull Run (First Manassas), Second Bull R The text of this guide to the major battles of America’s Civil War (equivalent in length to a physical book of approximately 30 pages) was prepared by the U.S. Department of the Interior’s National Park Service, which sponsors the American Battlefield Protection Program. Learn about 23 major battles of the Civil War: Antietam, First Bull Run (First Manassas), Second Bull Run (Second Manassas), Chancellorsville, Chattanooga, Chickamauga, Cold Harbor, Fair Oaks (Seven Pines), Fort Donelson, Fort Henry, Franklin, Fredericksburg (Marye’s Heights), Gettysburg, Kennesaw Mountain, Mobile Bay, Nashville, Perryville, Petersburg, Shiloh (Pittsburg Landing), Spotsylvania Court House, Stones River (Murfreesboro), Vicksburg, and Wilderness. Also includes an introductory article—by historian Edward Eggleston—that briefly describes the causes, campaigns, military leaders, and results of the war. Sample passage: FREDERICKSBURG Other Name: Marye’s Heights Location: Spotsylvania County and Fredericksburg, Virginia Dates: December 11–15, 1862 Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside (North); Gen. Robert E. Lee (South) Estimated Casualties: 17,929 total (North 13,353; South 4,576) Description: On November 14, Burnside, now in command of the Army of the Potomac, sent a corps to occupy the vicinity of Falmouth near Fredericksburg. The rest of the army soon followed. Lee reacted by entrenching his army on the heights behind the town. On December 11, Union engineers laid five pontoon bridges across the Rappahannock under fire. On the 12th, the Federal army crossed over, and on December 13, Burnside mounted a series of futile frontal assaults on Prospect Hill and Marye’s Heights that resulted in staggering casualties. Meade’s division, on the Union left flank, briefly penetrated Jackson’s line but was driven back by a counterattack. Union generals C. Feger Jackson and George Bayard, and Confederate generals Thomas R.R. Cobb and Maxey Gregg were killed. On December 15, Burnside called off the offensive and recrossed the river, ending the campaign. Burnside initiated a new offensive in January 1863, which quickly bogged down in the winter mud. The abortive “Mud March” and other failures led to Burnside’s replacement by Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker in January 1863. Result: Confederate victory

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3.7/5

The U.S. Civil War: The Battles, Generals, Issues, and Reconstruction by Publications International Ltd. (Manufacturer)

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3.8/5

Crossroads of Freedom: Antietam: The Battle that Changed the Course of the Civil War by James M. McPherson

The Battle of Antietam, fought on September 17, 1862, was the bloodiest single day in American history, with more than 6,000 soldiers killed--four times the number lost on D-Day, and twice the number killed in the September 11th terrorist attacks. In Crossroads of Freedom, America's most eminent Civil War historian, James M. McPherson, paints a masterful account of this pi The Battle of Antietam, fought on September 17, 1862, was the bloodiest single day in American history, with more than 6,000 soldiers killed--four times the number lost on D-Day, and twice the number killed in the September 11th terrorist attacks. In Crossroads of Freedom, America's most eminent Civil War historian, James M. McPherson, paints a masterful account of this pivotal battle, the events that led up to it, and its aftermath. As McPherson shows, by September 1862 the survival of the United States was in doubt. The Union had suffered a string of defeats, and Robert E. Lee's army was in Maryland, poised to threaten Washington. The British government was openly talking of recognizing the Confederacy and brokering a peace between North and South. Northern armies and voters were demoralized. And Lincoln had shelved his proposed edict of emancipation months before, waiting for a victory that had not come--that some thought would never come. Both Confederate and Union troops knew the war was at a crossroads, that they were marching toward a decisive battle. It came along the ridges and in the woods and cornfields between Antietam Creek and the Potomac River. Valor, misjudgment, and astonishing coincidence all played a role in the outcome. McPherson vividly describes a day of savage fighting in locales that became forever famous--The Cornfield, the Dunkard Church, the West Woods, and Bloody Lane. Lee's battered army escaped to fight another day, but Antietam was a critical victory for the Union. It restored morale in the North and kept Lincoln's party in control of Congress. It crushed Confederate hopes of British intervention. And it freed Lincoln to deliver the Emancipation Proclamation, which instantly changed the character of the war. McPherson brilliantly weaves these strands of diplomatic, political, and military history into a compact, swift-moving narrative that shows why America's bloodiest day is, indeed, a turning point in our history.

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5/5

Shiloh, 1862 by Winston Groom

Offers a detailed account of the Battle of Shiloh, a turning point when both the Union and the Confederacy realized the grand scale of the conflict, the large number of casualties to be expected, and that the war would not end quickly.

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3.9/5

Major Battles of the Civil War by Kim A. O'Connell

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3.5/5

Battle at Bull Run: A History of the First Major Campaign of the Civil War by William C. Davis

The first major history ever written on the first battle of the Civil War, this narrative describes the chaotic fighting by courageous amateurs that nearly resulted in Confederate independence.

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3.3/5

Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War by Nicholas Lemann

"An arresting piece of popular history." --Sean Wilentz, The New York Times Book Review Nicholas Lemann opens this extraordinary book with a riveting account of the horrific events of Easter 1873 in Colfax, Louisiana, where a white militia of Confederate veterans-turned-vigilantes attacked the black community there and massacred hundreds of people in a gruesome killing spr "An arresting piece of popular history." --Sean Wilentz, The New York Times Book Review Nicholas Lemann opens this extraordinary book with a riveting account of the horrific events of Easter 1873 in Colfax, Louisiana, where a white militia of Confederate veterans-turned-vigilantes attacked the black community there and massacred hundreds of people in a gruesome killing spree. This began an insurgency that changed the course of American history: for the next few years white Southern Democrats waged a campaign of political terrorism aiming to overturn the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments and challenge President Grant's support for the emergent structures of black political power. Redemption is the first book to describe in uncompromising detail this organized racial violence, which reached its apogee in Mississippi in 1875.

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4.3/5

No Better Place to Die: The Battle Of Stones River by Peter Cozzens

Peter Cozzens meticulously traces the chain of events as the Army of the Cumberland and the Army of Tennessee meet in Middle Tennessee on New Year's Eve 1862 in one of the bloodiest encounters of the Civil War. A mere handful of battlefields have come to epitomize the anguish and pain of America's Civil War: Gettysburg, Shiloh, Chancellorsville, Chickamauga. Yet another nam Peter Cozzens meticulously traces the chain of events as the Army of the Cumberland and the Army of Tennessee meet in Middle Tennessee on New Year's Eve 1862 in one of the bloodiest encounters of the Civil War. A mere handful of battlefields have come to epitomize the anguish and pain of America's Civil War: Gettysburg, Shiloh, Chancellorsville, Chickamauga. Yet another name belongs on that infamous list: Stones River, the setting for Peter Cozzens's No Better Place to Die.

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3.7/5

Three Little Battles of the American Civil War by Stephen Webb

Packed with factual detail, 'Three Little Battles' is a readable history of some little known actions that raged in the latter part of the Civil War--starting with the bloodbath that occurred at the battle of Olustee in early 1864 in North Florida. Olustee is probably the best known and most completely documented of the three engagements covered in this book. The poignant Packed with factual detail, 'Three Little Battles' is a readable history of some little known actions that raged in the latter part of the Civil War--starting with the bloodbath that occurred at the battle of Olustee in early 1864 in North Florida. Olustee is probably the best known and most completely documented of the three engagements covered in this book. The poignant and costly Battle of Griswoldville took place in Georgia in late 1864, during Sherman's 'March to the Sea'. Though it was the only significant infantry battle in that famous campaign, it is virtually unknown to the general public. It is also less well documented than Olustee. The final engagement involved the last stand of the famous 'Wizard of the Saddle', Nathan Bedford Forest. It was the Battle of Selma which took place deep in the heart of the South in Alabama in April, 1865, just 7 days before Lee's surrender in Virginia. Although these three engagements are not generally familiar to most outside certain circles of Civil War buffs and historians, each battle, when examined closely, is historically illustrative of the times. All three battles individually involved less than 15,000 combatants, but each was, in its own way, important beyond just numbers. Though the actions themselves were not famous many of the participants were. They included names such as Pierre Gustav Toutant Beauregard and James H. Wilson, among many others, including some founding fathers of the Confederacy. This book deals with some controversial material and is not for the overly sensitive. Because of the extensive use of primary sources (not cited), this popular history could be used as a beginning point for research. However, it is mostly intended to be an 'easy read' for anyone who enjoys exploring un-blinkered accounts of American history.

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4.5/5

Battles of the American Civil War by Jonathan Sutherland

Civil War - always the most heartrending experience for any nation. America's was no different, families split, brother fighting brother - but always the overriding sincerity of the cause. There were many bloody conflicts as the two sides fought with determination and purpose. This book looks at over sixty major engagements. They are listed alphabetically and give the back Civil War - always the most heartrending experience for any nation. America's was no different, families split, brother fighting brother - but always the overriding sincerity of the cause. There were many bloody conflicts as the two sides fought with determination and purpose. This book looks at over sixty major engagements. They are listed alphabetically and give the background history and then follow the course of the fight. Details of the principal troops and commanders are included with a map of the battlefield. Details of current facilities for visitors are also given.

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5/5

Battles and Leaders of the Civil War by Ned Bradford (Editor)

First-hand testimonials from officers, soldiers, and civilians involved in America's bloodiest conflict, accompanied by black and white line drawings, etchings, and maps. Covers battles from Bull Run and Gettysburg to the surrender at Appomattox, with words from Lee, Grant, Sherman as well as lesser known participants such as medics and nurses.

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3.8/5

Fields of Honor: Pivotal Battles of the Civil War by Edwin C. Bearss

Few historians have ever captured the drama, excitement, and tragedy of the War Between the States quite like Edwin Bearss. The acclaimed "Homer of the Civil War," has won a huge, devoted following with his extraordinary battlefield tours and eloquent soliloquies about the heroes, scoundrels, and little-known moments of a conflict that still fascinates America. Antietam, S Few historians have ever captured the drama, excitement, and tragedy of the War Between the States quite like Edwin Bearss. The acclaimed "Homer of the Civil War," has won a huge, devoted following with his extraordinary battlefield tours and eloquent soliloquies about the heroes, scoundrels, and little-known moments of a conflict that still fascinates America. Antietam, Shiloh, Chickamauga, Gettysburg: these hallowed battles and more than a dozen more come alive as never before, rich with human interest and colorful detail culled from a lifetime of study. Illustrated with detailed maps and archival images, this 448-page volume commemorates the 140th anniversary of the war's end with a unique narrative of its most critical battles, translating Bearss' inimitable delivery into print. As he guides readers from the first shots at Fort Sumter to Gettysburg's bloody fields to the dignified surrender at Appomattox, his engagingly plainspoken but expert account demonstrates why he stands beside Shelby Foote, James McPherson, and Ken Burns in the front rank of modern chroniclers of the Civil War, as the Pulitzer Prize-winning McPherson himself points out in his admiring introduction. A must for every one of America's countless Civil War and history buffs alike, this major work will stand as an important reference and enduring legacy of a great historian for generations to come.

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